Climate: The Road to Paris

The world will gather in Paris at the end of this month to attempt to craft a successor climate change treaty to the failed Kyoto Protocol that expires in 2020. We’ll have a lot to say about this as it gets under way, but for now, get a load of Article 11 of the draft treaty that has been under discussion in Bonn, Germany last month. As is usual procedure, the items not agreed to or to be settled later at the final conference are indicated in brackets.

[An International Tribunal of Climate Justice as][A] [compliance mechanism] is hereby established to address cases of non-compliance of the commitments of developed country Parties on mitigation, adaptation, [provision of] finance, technology development and transfer [and][,] capacity-building[,] and transparency of action and support, including through the development of an indicative list of consequences, taking into account the cause, type, degree and frequency of non-compliance.

A facilitative mechanism is hereby established to facilitate implementation by developing country Parties for enhanced action on mitigation, adaptation and transparency of action. The mechanism shall be facilitative, non-punitive, non-adversarial and non-judicial.]

An International Tribunal of Climate Justice, eh? A method of “compliance” for the “commitments” by developed countries (which means: rich countries pay up!*) that is somehow also “facilitative, non-punitive, non-adversarial and non-judicial.” Exactly how does a “non-judicial” court work? How soon until the climatistas are selling bridges in Brooklyn?

*As mentioned here before, India is willing to go along with the climate nonsense—if they’re paid $2.5 trillion. Good that they’ll have a court that will compel payment. In “non-punitive” ways of course.