A Quadrennial Republican Smear [Updated]

I have noticed this for a long time: every four years, when a Republican national convention is in prospect, national news outlets will do stories on strip clubs and prostitutes who are eagerly awaiting the Republicans’ patronage. Of course, the much-hoped-for scandal never happens, and when the convention is over there have been a few stories about disgruntled prostitutes and strippers complaining that Republicans are no good for business. But that doesn’t prevent the same meme from cropping up four years later.

Thus, we have AFP: “Strip Clubs Get Ready For Republican Convention.”

On paper, the Republican Party classifies pornography as a major public health problem.

But just in case delegates to the nominating convention here next week forget that, Cleveland’s strip clubs are going all out to get ready for the party, due to embrace Donald Trump formally as its presidential candidate.

The Daily Beast chimes in:

Donald Trump is the best thing to happen to Cleveland’s strip clubs in a generation. Possibly multiple generations.

The top strip clubs in Cleveland, Ohio, are all preparing for the inevitable influx of horny, cash-flinging Republican out-of-towners who will drop by during next week’s GOP convention.

Right. Don’t hold your breath waiting for the Daily Beast to run the follow-up on how Republican delegates weren’t so horny or cash-flinging after all.

Meanwhile, where are the stories about strippers and prostitutes gearing up for the bonanza of the Democratic convention? Heh. Just kidding. There are none. There never are. If you search “democratic convention strip clubs prostitutes” on Google News, the closest they can come is the Daily Beast on the GOP convention. This is a bad joke that recurs every four years, like clockwork. It is just one of a million small ways in which the “mainstream” liberal media put their thumbs on the scale in favor of their party, the Democrats.

UPDATE: A friend sent along this 1992 cartoon, which looks like it came from Playboy. To be fair, though, its theme is more bipartisan: