Boris for President? (Updated)

You know, Boris Johnson was born in New York. Hmmm. If you think about it, he’s the ideal successor to Donald Trump in 2024. Never mind that Boris is said to have renounced his American citizenship several years ago (are we sure he actually filed the formal paperwork?), but in any case if we credit the idea of “birthright citizenship” beloved of the multicultural left, it should be a simple matter of un-renouncing his citizenship and running for president here in 2024. It would be the ultimate nightmare for the left, which is why I want history to record that the “Draft Boris 2024!” movement began here, on Power Line, on this date.

UPDATE: Law professor Stephen Bainbridge tweets this in response to me:

Speaking of nightmares for the left, to restate an observation from last night’s leftist freakout in Britain, how can you tell when a nation is “bitterly divided”? It’s when the left loses an election. There were open threats of fighting in the streets from some angry leftists on British TV.

So let’s look ahead to next November, and how the left may react to Trump’s re-election. We don’t need to imagine: A sociology professor has laid out a scenario in St. Greta of Thunberg’s favorite media outlet, the former Time magazine. In short, “The Resistance” will—and should—turn to violence:

[I]f the Republicans maintain political control in 2020, protest in the U.S. is likely to become a lot more disruptive. . .

As the groups that worked so hard for those midterm successes set their sights on the 2020 election, they continue to support peaceful demonstrations, cultivating the embers of outrage that fueled the Resistance from the outset. For now, these protest events amount to a controlled burn that is not likely to spill over into real disruption and potentially violent resistance. . .

But if the election results in another four years of Republican leadership, protesters of all ages who have been restraining their activism and focusing on the electoral process are likely to take it to the streets en masse. . . History shows us that when activism gets more disruptive and confrontational, institutional power responds. And that’s when the distance between peaceful protest and violent protest narrows.

That pretty much sums up the left today. Like the South in 1860, if the left can’t get its way at the ballot box, they’ll resort to coercion and violence to get their way.

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