TV Network Standards, Then and Now

Back in 1973, the liberal journalist Nicholas von Hoffman, the first Point-Counterpoint commentator on CBS’s “60 Minutes,” was fired by producer Don Hewitt for an on-air comment that Hewitt deemed offensive and inappropriate. Hoffman referred to President Nixon, then well into the agonies of Watergate, as “the dead mouse on the kitchen floor of America, and the only question now is who’s going to pick him up by his tail and throw him in the garbage.”

Flash forward to CBS’s current “Late Show With Stephen Colbert,” where one of his senior writers, John Thibodeaux, dismissed Washington, Jefferson, and Hamilton because of their slave ownership, and advocated for Harriett Tubman on the $20 bill. He put it this way: “She repeatedly risked her life for other people’s freedom, and now we’re asking her to hang out with those douche nozzles?” Real class, that. Funny, too. (Not.)

Little chance CBS will even reprimand Thibodeaux. Amazing that we’d get to the point of missing Don Hewitt, who was no friend of conservatives.

This is only the latest from late night programs that used to attempt to entertain the broad spectrum of Americans, but now only cater to people suffering from insomnia or dementia from watching too much MSNBC in the evening.

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