Author Archives: Paul Mirengoff

The Fed, Trump’s other “fall guy”

Featured image At the micro level, President Trump blames “bad management” for the downward turn of certain companies. At the macro level, he blames the Federal Reserve Board for a weakening of the American economy. Of the two, the Fed is a more plausible “fall guy.” Like trade policy, but unlike “bad management,” interest rate levels are not an economic constant. They are subject to change by the Fed and such changes, »

Are American companies suffering from an outbreak of “bad management”?

Featured image Here’s President Trump arguing that bad management, not tariffs, is what’s hurting American companies: A lot of badly run companies are trying to blame tariffs. In other words, if they’re running badly and they’re having a bad quarter, or if they’re just unlucky in some way, they’re likely to blame the tariffs. It’s not the tariffs. It’s called “bad management.” If you think about it for half a second, this »

Tiananmen Square and Hong Kong: The same showdown [UPDATED]

Featured image So says Claudia Rosett, writing in the Wall Street Journal. She should know. She has been present for both. It’s true that the two showdowns are 30 years apart and arise in different venues. But in both cases, China’s control of a major city was challenged by a population seeking freedom. In the first case, rather than give in to legitimate demands, the Communist Party resorted to guns and mass »

Iranian foreign minister received warm welcome in Europe

Featured image I don’t mind that French president Emmanuel Macron met with Iran’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif last month, although it did bother me that the meeting occurred while the G-7 summit was in progress and President Trump was still in France. But what really aggravates me is the warm reception Zarif received in Europe from various public figures. Mina Bai of the Gatestone Institute has the details. In Sweden: After »

A conservative plan to reduce shootings (and other homicides)

Featured image Recent mass shootings have prompted calls for new gun control legislation aimed primarily at rifles. However, most murders are not the product of mass shootings by people who want to make a statement, political or otherwise. They are committed on a small scale, with handguns, by ordinary criminals. At Conservative Review, Daniel Horowitz presents a seven-step plan to reduce homicides. I have distilled his seven steps to six, which are »

Stormy hearings ahead

Featured image Rust never sleeps and neither do congressional Democrats intent on impeaching President Trump. When the House returns to session next week, the House Judiciary Committee will explore five instances of supposed obstruction of justice by Trump that they say are documented in Robert Mueller’s report. None amounts to actual obstruction of justice. Each, by now, is yawn inducing. But House Dems also plan an inquiry that might gain attention and »

How Montgomery County, Maryland enables rapists

Featured image Jason Hopkins of the Daily Caller reports that in Montgomery Country, Maryland, where I live, at least seven illegal immigrants have been arrested and charged with sexual crimes since July 25 of this year. In the latest case, Emilio Carrasco-Hernandez, a 37-year-old from Honduras, was arrested for allegedly holding a 15-year-old girl down and raping her. In other cases, illegal immigrants have been charged with raping an 11-year-old and a »

Unlike his predecessors, Trump gets China

Featured image President Trump’s tough approach to China has drawn criticism from his opponents. They complain that he has ignored diplomatic conventions and upended a tense but workable economic relationship. Trump’s approach also makes some of his supporters nervous because they fear that a trade war with China might well throw our economy into a tailspin and perhaps cost Trump the 2020 election. I confess to being nervous on these grounds. There »

Bidding for black votes, sometimes it’s not easy even for Democrats

Featured image I’ve mentioned before that it’s difficult, if not impossible, for Republicans to win the votes of African-Americans through policy proposals. These voters are loyal to the Democratic party. In any case, the Dems invariably will outbid the GOP through more blatant race conscious policies than the ones Republicans propose. Democrats too can find it difficult to bid for black votes — when they are running against each other. Take the »

A trial date for Khalid Sheikh Mohammed. . .in 2021

Featured image The 9/11 attacks occurred almost 18 years ago. Now, finally, a trial date has been set for Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and other plotters of the attacks. That date is January 11, 2021. These bastards should have been executed no later than in 2009, after they acknowledged, and attempted to justify, their roles in the 9/11 terrorism. But if a trial was needed, it should have occurred years ago. Why didn’t »

Trump cuts Bolton out of decision on Afghanistan

Featured image The Washington Post reports that John Bolton, President Trump’s national security adviser, has been excluded from discussions about an Afghanistan “peace deal” between the U.S. and the Taliban. Bolton apparently doesn’t favor such a deal. This is a president who rages against Fox News because people who appear on that network occasionally say things he doesn’t like hearing. So we shouldn’t be surprised that Trump doesn’t want to hear from »

Trump administration backs Israel as tensions rise in region

Featured image Hezbollah has stated that it intends to produce missiles capable of striking Israel with pinpoint accuracy. Iran is assisting Hezbollah in this enterprise. It is helping Hezbollah construct and develop facilities at which precision missiles are manufactured. Israel has responded by attacking targets in Syria, Lebanon, and Iraq. Attacks in the latter two countries are a recent development, prompted by stepped up Iranian efforts to assist Hezbollah’s missile development. The »

A one-step approach to dealing with accusations of racism

Featured image Recently, the Washington Post published an article by Rebecca Hains called “Dear fellow white people: Here’s what to do when you’re called racist.” Hains is a professor of media and communication at Salem State University, where she also serves as a faculty fellow for diversity, power dynamics and social justice. Neither the article nor the statement of Hains’s credentials is a parody. Hains prescribed five steps her “fellow white people” »

Set back George Soros, support Jonathan Fahey

Featured image Earlier this year, George Soros heavily funded primary challenges to two veteran Northern Virginia Commonwealth Attorneys, both of who whom have served their counties well and both of whom are Democrats. In Arlington County, Soros backed Parisa Dehghani-Tafti, a criminal defense lawyer whose slander of the local police force was her calling card. She narrowly defeated Theo Stamos. In Fairfax County, Soros funded Steve Descano in his race against incumbent »

Dems will hold just one debate next month

Featured image Ten Democrats have qualified for the next Democratic presidential debate to be held in mid-September. The ten are: Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders, Kamala Harris, Pete Buttigieg, Cory Booker, Beto O’Rourke, Andrew Yang, Julian Castro, and Amy Klobuchar. Because no more than ten candidates qualified, there will be just one debate. This means that, for the first time, Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren, the two candidates most likely to »

Identity politics as a substitute for family ties [with comment by Steve]

Featured image Mary Eberstadt sees a strong connection between the rise of identity politics and the decline of the American family. Such a connection seems clear if one thinks about it, but the idea never occurred to me. Both the family and identity politics provide a partial answer to this question: “Who am I?” The more one answers this question in familial terms, the less likely one is to answer it primarily »

DOJ Inspector General preparing separate report on Comey

Featured image Byron York reports that Michael Horowitz, the Justice Department’s inspector general, is preparing a report on the conduct of fired FBI Director James Comey. This report will be separate from Horowitz’s larger report on the DOJ’s handling of the Trump-Russia probe. According to Byron’s sources, the separate report on Comey will deal with his handling of several memos he wrote memorializing conversations with President Trump. Byron observes: Comey’s memos were, »