Author Archives: Steven Hayward

The Antidote

Featured image Over at The Federalist, Joy Pullman draws our attention to a new working paper from the University of Arkansas that finds liberal bias in academia manifesting itself in lower grades for conservative students. From the abstract: We find that while standardized test scores are the best predictors of grade point average, ideology also has impacts. Even with controls for SES, demographics, and SAT scores, liberal students report higher college grades »

The Cultural Revolution at Evergreen State

Featured image News items about outrageous events at college campuses have been coming in so fast the last couple weeks that it is impossible to keep up. At this point I’m starting to think Sir Roger Scruton is right that we should just “get rid of universities altogether.” There are a couple of stories I’m watching right now that I intend to find time to analyze in depth, but for the moment, »

The Infantile, Superficial Left

Featured image If you are a glutton for punishment like me and you read a lot of leftist academic journals (but I repeat myself. . .), you discover quickly that for the left, everything is violence. Literally violence, especially free speech, but also capitalism of course. Violence is the instrument of racism and domination. Another peculiar feature of leftist academic jargon today is to talk about “bodies”—especially “black and brown bodies,” which »

Loose Ends (80)

Featured image • Today’s decoding of liberal lexigraphy: It has become a common refrain from liberals to say we need to have a “national conversation”—usually about racism or “Islamophobia” or something. Translation: “Shut up and agree with liberalism.” Leftists don’t really want a “conversation” about anything, still less an argument that they’ll lose. It’s more like this: • Who said this? “People are driving across that border with tons of everything from byproducts »

The Prospects for Trump, 18 Months Out

Featured image Right now if I had to drop a wager, I’d bet on Trump’s re-election next year. Yes, his overall approval rating remains below 50 percent in most surveys (though stand by on this), but Obama’s approval rating was below 50 percent for much of his first term, and he was re-elected anyway. Moreover, Trump’s highest approval ratings are for his handling of the economy, where he reaches 60 percent in »

“Diversity” and the Welfare State

Featured image John’s post yesterday about how Denmark’s left-leaning social democrats are turning against immigration—not just any immigration but specifically from you-know-where—has prompted me to writing about a broader dilemma that, sooner or later, America’s liberals will need to confront. Milton Friedman and other libertarians long argued that you can have high rates of unskilled immigration, or a generous welfare state, but not both. The basic thought is that high rates of »

The Power Line Show, Ep. 124: “Cracks in the Ivory Tower,” A Conversation with Phil Magness

Featured image This week I talk with economic historian Phillip Magness, co-author (along with Jason Brennan) of a brilliant new book, Cracks in the Ivory Tower: The Moral Mess of Higher Education. This splendidly written and fast-paced book vindicates Stan Evans’s first rule of insufficient paranoia—no matter how bad you think things are, when you look closer, you find out it’s even worse than you thought. Crack in the Ivory Tower explains »

The Week in Pictures: Nadlering Nabob of Nihilism Edition

Featured image How lucky is Trump to have Jerry Nadler as his chief inquisitor on Capitol Hill? I recall Nadler from his Jabba-the-Hutt days defending Bill Clinton from impeachment exactly 20 years ago. He must have thought we wouldn’t notice it is the same guy if he underwent barometric surgery—that’s where you let high pressure squeeze you into the human likeness of a raisin, but side effects include a full-blown case of »

Loose Ends (79)

Featured image • I firmly believe that Attorney General William Barr should get the exact same punishment for contempt of Congress that Obama’s Attorney General Eric Holder got for his contempt of Congress. • Prediction: It’s going to be Tormund. Think about it. You know it makes sense. You heard it here first. • Finally! A good parody of plastic bottled water: Maybe the Black Rifle Coffee folks can start offering this. • »

Passings

Featured image Another busy, travel-heavy week, so I wasn’t able to post a proper obituary notice for John Lukacs, who passed away early this week at the age of 95. The first Lukacs book I read as an undergraduate way back in 1980 was The Passing of the Modern Age, followed shortly by 1945: Year Zero, and I was hooked. (Both of these books hold up extremely well after 40 years.) Lukacs »

An Inflection Point on School Shootings?

Featured image As many observers have noted, while the number of school shootings relative to the total population is tiny, in a large country even a tiny number will have a disproportionate impact on the public mind—and also lead to copycats, or even a “contagion” of troubled young people deciding to enter the lists by shooting up a school. This week’s shooting in Colorado might come to be seen as a turning »

Google Censorship Update: Victory Over Communism!

Featured image Ryan Williams at the Claremont Institute reports that Google has changed its mind: See Ryan’s complete update of the story here. One wonders whether Google changed its mind because it discerned a “mistake” or took note of the public heat it was getting over this. But a deeper issue needs to be addressed. A number of conservatives have said that although Google, Facebook, and Twitter are engaging in censorship of »

Loose Ends (78)

Featured image • CNN is announcing that Meghan Markle, the Duchess of Sussex, has given birth to a baby boy: London (CNN)Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, gave birth to a boy in the early hours of Monday, Buckingham Palace has announced. . . The boy will be the eighth great-grandchild for Queen Elizabeth II and the seventh in line to the throne behind Prince Charles, Prince William and his three children and »

The Voter Suppression Myth

Featured image Democrats believe their own bull—- about the Side of History so much that they can’t imagine losing an election, because if you have History on your side how can you lose except by someone using the Dark Side of the Force. Hence the daily claim of the left that Democrats have lost because of voter suppression. Kamala Harris, for examples, has claimed: “Let’s say this loud and clear — without »

Breaking: Google Censors the Claremont Institute

Featured image Last week Facebook kicked Milo Yiannopoulos, Alex Jones, Louis Farrakhan and Paul Watson off of their platform because of their extremism. While I have no brief for any of these individuals, I agreed with the critics who said “don’t think it will just stop with them.” Sure enough, it appears Google is censoring the Claremont Institute. Claremont president Ryan Williams explained in a Twitter thread Sunday evening, which I have »

Maggie, 40 Years On

Featured image Today is the 40th anniversary of the election of Margaret Thatcher as the first female prime minister of Great Britain—a precursor of the election the following year of Ronald Reagan. Before her arrival many people thought England’s long, slow postwar decline was irreversible.  “Britain is becoming a third world country . . . an offshore industrial slum,” Economist magazine correspondent Robert Moss wrote in 1977. Daniel Yergin and Joseph Stanislaw recall in »

The Power Line Show, Ep. 123: “No Ad Hominem Arguments”: A Conversation with Charles Lipson

Featured image This week I talk with Charles Lipson, the Peter Ritzma Professor Emeritus of Political Science at the University of Chicago, about how to talk and argue about matters amidst the increasingly bitter polarization of our time. But along the way we revisit his idiosyncratic intellectual odyssey that brought him from rural Mississippi to the Ivy leagues. In addition to his academic work on international relations, you can read Charles’s popular »