Baltimore riots

Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the coming ninny state

Featured image Scott’s post, “The Unmaking of a Mayor,” directs our attention to the stunning exchange between Fox News Channel’s Leland Vittert and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake during her weekly press conference. Vittert was pressing Rawlings-Blake on whether the wave of shootings that has plagued Baltimore is related to the sharp decline in arrests. Rawlings-Blake looked like a deer in the headlights. I almost wanted to find her a “safe space” and »

I’ll say one thing for Martin O’Malley

Featured image He isn’t Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. But then, Rawlings-Blake, the current mayor of Baltimore, isn’t running for President. O’Malley, the former Baltimore mayor is, and he’s not profiting from reports about how badly the city is doing. As the Washington Post puts it, “Baltimore’s blight has O’Malley on the defensive.” The Post provides a useful look at O’Malley’s time as mayor. As you would expect from an ambitious liberal, O’Malley was an »

The unmaking of a mayor

Featured image City life has not improved in Baltimore since the indictment of six Baltimore police officers. Some residents have gone on a murder spree targeting other residents. Innocent bystanders have the reasonable fear of getting caught in the crossfire. Drudge has compiled stories »

Mosby’s favorites

Featured image Baltimore City state’s attorney Marilyn Mosby is prosecuting the six Baltimore police officers charged in connection with the death of Freddie Gray. She seems to bring a certain animus to the task. I questioned Mosby’s professional behavior in the post “Mosby so far,” commenting on Mosby’s press conference announcing the charges she had brought. Evidence of Mosby’s animus may also be evident in two tweets written by third parties that »

Mosby doubles down on demagoguery

Featured image Yesterday, Marilyn Mosby, the prosecutor who brought charges against six Baltimore police officers accused of mistreating Freddie Gray, sat on stage at a Baltimore concert in which Prince performed a protest song about Gray and the recent unrest in the city. As I understand it, the concert was in honor of Gray, and Prince called Mosby and her husband to the stage. Based on the reports I’ve seen, I would »

Liberals block the most promising path in Baltimore

Featured image Many liberals and some conservatives would like to force a major reduction in the prison population, even though current incarceration rates contributed significantly to sharply reduced crime rates. One objection to the crusade to reduce incarceration is high recidivism. Nearly 70 percent of released prisoners are arrested within three years. To deal with this objection, proponents of reform call for rehabilitation and training programs for prisoners. They sometimes talk as »

What really ails our cities

Featured image My impression is that Baltimore was particularly hard hit by the last recession and hasn’t really recovered. But, as I have argued, this doesn’t mean that cities hit less hard are immune from the kind of rioting that followed the death of Freddie Gray. Colbert King of the Washington Post makes this point. He contends that Washington, D.C., which is nearly recession-proof, shares the same basic ills as Baltimore, and »

Freddie Gray’s knife, Part Two

Featured image The prosecutor in the Freddie Gray case contends that it was not unlawful for Gray to be carrying his knife — a “spring-assisted, one-hand-operated” device — and that therefore it was improper to arrest him. I argued here that the prosecutor is likely wrong because Baltimore city law makes it unlawful to “possess any knife with an automatic spring or other device for opening and/or closing the blade. . . »

Freddie Gray’s knife, Marilyn Mosby’s bias

Featured image One of the charges brought by prosecutor Marilyn Mosby in the Freddie Gray case is false arrest. The police arrested Gray for carrying an illegal knife, but Mosby has announced that Gray’s knife was not an illegal switchblade under Maryland law. Defense attorneys contest this claim. They have filed a motion to inspect the knife. Who is right about the knife? Without having seen the knife, I can’t say for »

Report: Freddie Gray task force perceived no homicide

Featured image CNN reports that the Baltimore police investigation into the death of Freddie Gray doesn’t support some of the charges, including the most serious, filed by Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby. The police investigators thought that, at most, manslaughter charges might be warranted. Yet, Mosby charged Caesar Goodson with second degree murder. CNN also reports that, according to the police, homicide investigators, after being briefed by the medical examiner’s office, »

Vigilant police officer shot; vigilant policing under assault

Featured image A plainclothes New York City police officer was shot in the face in Queens yesterday when an ex-con opened fire into his unmarked patrol car, the New York Post reports. According to Police Commissioner Bill Bratton, the police officer, Brian Moore, and his partner were on patrol when they spotted the suspect “adjusting an object in his waistband.” When they pulled up and tried to question the suspect, he pulled »

Mosby so far [With Comment by John]

Featured image Baltimore state’s attorney Marilyn Mosby has charged six Baltimore police officers with serious crimes in connection with the death of Freddie Gray on April 19. The New York Times account of the charges is here. The Washington Post enumerates the charges here and takes a look at Ms. Mosby here. The charges quickly followed both Gray’s death and the rioting of the mob in Baltimore. Ms. Mosby’s announcement of the »

Marilyn Mosby: hypocrite, grandstander, ideologue

Featured image Alan Dershowitz, the famous defense lawyer, has called the case against the six Baltimore officers involved in the death of Freddie Gray “a show trial.” The actions of prosecutor Marilyn Mosby “had nothing to do with justice,” but instead amounted to “crowd control,” Dershowitz said in remarks reported by the Daily Caller. With regard to the second-degree murder charges against Caesar Goodson, Dershowitz stated that “there’s no plausible, hypothetical, conceivable »

A look at the 6 officers charged

Featured image The Washington Post has the lowdown on the six Baltimore police officers charged in the death of Freddy Gray. As Paul Mirengoff inferred from the silence at the time of the charges, it’s a “diverse” group: The six officers accused in the death of Freddie Gray face a litany of charges that include second-degree depraved-heart murder, involuntary manslaughter, false imprisonment and misconduct in office. The officers — three white, three »

Additional thoughts about the Freddie Gray case

Featured image I have posted my initials thoughts on the criminal charges against six Baltimore police officers. Former federal prosecutor Bill Otis has offered more extensive, and better-informed, observations. Among them are the following, all of which make good sense to me: Will the mob tolerate an acquittal? The calls in recent days have been for “justice.” I have considerable doubt whether those doing the loudest calling have even a slight interest »

Thoughts on the criminal charges in the Freddie Gray case [Updated by John]

Featured image As John discussed below, the Baltimore State’s Attorney is bringing criminal charges against all six of the Baltimore police officers who were involved in the arrest and handling of Freddie Gray. I have a few observations about this story. First, in the accounts I have have read, the race of the six officers charged — Caesar R. Goodson Jr. (who is charged with second-degree murder), Brian W. Rice, William G. »

The Tito Fuentes theory of criminal justice

Featured image Tito Fuentes played second-base for the San Francisco Giants during the 1960s and early 1970s. Once, after being hit in the head by a pitch, Fuentes reportedly said: “They shouldn’t throw at me. I’m the father of five or six kids.” I thought of Tito when I heard President Obama and others theorize that the criminal justice system — long prison sentences and/or “over-criminalization” — is partially to blame for »