Discrimination

Is Critical Race Training Illegal? (Part 2)

Featured image I noted here that U.S. Civil Rights Commissioner Peter Kirsanow has written to the Mayor of the City of Seattle, suggesting that “critical race theory” or “white privilege” training that the city recently imposed on its employees likely violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits employment discrimination based on race. Paul added that the Department of Justice has also sought information about the same training »

Parents sue Montgomery County schools over race discrimination

Featured image I’ve written before about how Montgomery County, Maryland, where I live, discriminates against Asian-Americans in education. The discrimination consists of limiting the number of Asian-Americans admitted to the County’s “magnet” programs for gifted students. The County wants more Black and Latino students in these programs. To achieve this, it admits these students based on lower standards than are required for other applicants. The result is the exclusion of some Asian-Americans »

Diversity fever

Featured image The Washington football team (formerly known as the Redskins and now in search of a replacement name) has hired Jason Wright as team president. Wright becomes the first African-American president of an NFL team. However, there have been African-American coaches and general managers — positions that, depending on what Wright’s duties will be, may be at least as important as team president. Wright was an NFL running back for several »

Nightmare at Oberlin

Featured image Things haven’t gone well for Oberlin College in court recently. First, it was found liable for defaming Gibson’s Bakery. After the bakery’s owner tried to stop a black student from shoplifting, the Oberlin student senate condemned the bakery as racist and called for a boycott of its products, which Oberlin stopped purchasing for a time. A jury awarded the Gibson family $44 million in damages, reduced to $33 million by »

Supreme Court, per Neil Gorsuch, invents new LGBT rights

Featured image In this time of pandemic, it’s easy to lose a robust sense of where we are in the year. Today, the Supreme Court reminded us that we’re at the time of year when it delivers decisions in major cases. Until recently, this was a dreaded time for conservatives. We dreaded it mainly because the Supreme Court was prone to inventing new constitutional rights based on its policy preferences, not on »

What I believe

Featured image Larry Bacow, the president of Harvard, blasted this email to members of the Harvard Community: The last several months have been disorienting for all of us. COVID-19 has profoundly disrupted the lives of people worldwide. It has caused more than 365,000 deaths around the globe and more than 100,000 in the United States alone. Forty million Americans have lost their jobs, and countless others live in fear of both the »

Biden opposed creation of office to probe sex harassment by Senators

Featured image The Office of Senate Fair Employment Practices was established in 1991 to investigate claims of discrimination, including sexual harassment, arising from the Senate. Some Senators opposed the creation of this office. The opposition was bipartisan. It included Republicans, led by Warren Rudman, as well as Democrats, including Joe Biden. Prior to the creation of this office, Congress was exempt from laws banning employment discrimination. Charles Grassley introduced an amendment to »

Trump DOJ defends female athletes

Featured image The Justice Department has filed a statement of interest in a case challenging a Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference (CIAC) policy that enables biological males to compete against biological females. Attorney General Barr explained: In our pluralistic society we generally try to accommodate how individuals desire to live their lives up to the point where those desires impinge on the other people’s rights. Allowing biological males to compete in all-female sports »

Bloomberg’s treatment of women, a closer look

Featured image I don’t know how much longer we’ll have Michael Bloomberg to “kick around” or, if he persists, whether he will remain worth writing about as a candidate. However, I want to say more about the attacks against him for his alleged behavior towards female employees. I don’t want to discuss this from a political perspective, except to say that the allegations are extremely damaging politically. I want to talk about »

The Obama Labor Department in its eleventh year?

Featured image One of my biggest grievances with Alex Acosta’s stewardship of the Department of Labor was his pursuit, based on indefensible statistical analyses, of compensation discrimination claims against Oracle and other high tech Silicon Valley companies. I discussed the flaws in the Labor Department’s analyses here. These actions were filed in January 2017, just as the Obama administration was coming to an end. The idea was to force the Trump Labor »

Does the 1964 Civil Rights Act ban discrimination based on sexual orientation?

Featured image Tomorrow, the Supreme Court will hear oral argument in a case where the issue is whether the ban on discrimination because of sex contained in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 encompasses discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. George Will considers the matter in his latest column (the title of which, in the online edition, misstates his argument, I think). Will concludes that discriminating against someone »

Acosta DOL seeks to impose radical diversity agenda on law firms

Featured image The Obama Labor Department is now in its eleventh year. The first eight were under the direction of President Obama’s Labor Secretaries, most notably Tom Perez. The remainder are under the direction of Alex Acosta, President Trump’s choice for the job. The latest manifestation of the DOL’s left-liberalism under Acosta is its warning to law firms that they must become more diverse or else risk losing contracts with the federal »

Why the Equality Act of 2019 is dangerous legislation

Featured image Last month, Democrats introduced the Equality Act of 2019. It would modify existing civil rights legislation to ban discrimination against LGBTQ people in employment, housing, public accommodations, jury service, education, federal programs, and credit. It sounds good. No one should favor discriminating in employment, housing, etc. based on sexual orientation, etc. But there are serious problems with the Equality Act of 2019, such that Republicans should prevent its passage in »

U.S. Women’s soccer team sues for equal pay

Featured image The 1996 Olympic Games were held in Atlanta, but some of the soccer matches took place at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C. I took our family to see a doubleheader — a women’s match between Brazil and Norway and a men’s match between Ghana and South Korea. The two women’s teams were among the five best in the world at that time. The two men’s teams probably would have been »

Judge Ho crushes it

Featured image The moral argument against employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is, I believe, compelling. Accordingly, there’s a plausible argument that such discrimination should be outlawed. However, there is no credible case that Congress has outlawed it. This hasn’t stopped liberal judges from finding that Congress did so in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Never mind that this Act was passed at a time when »

California sets quotas for females on boards of directors [UPDATED]

Featured image In response to the #MeToo movement, California has enacted several laws regarding sexual harassment claims. You can read about them in this report by the law firm of Mayer Brown LLP. Some provisions make sense, others not so much. What really caught my eye, though, was a new law not about sexual harassment, but about female representation on boards of directors. The bill is SB 826. Here is how Mayer »

CRB: Sowell’s inconvenient truths

Featured image We continue our preview of the new (Summer) issue of the Claremont Review of Books hot off the press. It is in the mail to subscribers now. Buy an annual subscription including immediate online access here for the modest price of $19.95. It is an invaluable magazine for those of us who love trustworthy essays on, and reviews of books about, politics, history, literature and culture. I reviewed the new »