Germany

Who Blew Up the Pipeline?

Featured image Who blew up the Nord Stream pipelines? Your guess is as good as mine. It does seem peculiar to think Russia would have blown up their own pipeline, but it is not inconceivable that a faction of Russia’s military is trying to sabotage Putin as a prelude for ousting him, or that Putin sees it as a kind of “Cortez burning his ships” moment to indicate that he is all-in »

Germany: Finally Facing Energy Reality

Featured image When I made a government-sponsored junket to Germany in 2008 to tour their ambitious energy and environmental plans, every expert and government official our delegation met said the same thing: to have any chance of making Germany’s ambitious carbon-emissions reduction targets, they’d have to keep their nuclear power plants, despite the determination of the previous Social Democrats to phase them out. It seemed possible that Angela Merkel’s Christian Democrat-led coalition »

What Did Socialists Use For Lighting Before Candles?

Featured image How bad is the coming energy shortage in Germany? Deutsche Bank is counting on people to substitute wood burning in their homes for fossil fuels: The German energy crisis has reached the point where Deutsche Bank starts to 'model' (let's call it that) the potential for **gas-to-wood** substitution for heating German households this winter | #NothingToSeeHere #ONGT #GasCrisis pic.twitter.com/zuSls1SiCP — Javier Blas (@JavierBlas) July 13, 2022 Courtesy of Stephen Green, »

Photo of the Day

Featured image At first I thought this photo of the G-7 meeting had to be a fake, or deeply photoshopped, but apparently it is genuine: First of all, Boris Johnson looks like he just stumbled in from an all-night bender. And just where is President Biden’s right hand? I’m working on a separate piece about why this was maybe the worst G-7 meeting since the 1979 G-7 meeting in Japan, which, coincidentally, »

Germany Backslides

Featured image The world was startled and impressed two weeks ago when Germany announced in the immediate aftermath of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine that it would increase its defense spending substantially, keep some coal-fired power plants running that would otherwise have been replaced with Russian natural gas, and rethink its plan to shut down its remaining nuclear power plants. Well, they’ve done their rethinking on nuclear power, and decided—”Never mind: we’re going »

Europe in character

Featured image As a Russian invasion of Ukraine becomes more and more likely, major European nations behave more and more in character. Britain, in its finest Churchill-Thatcher tradition, is stepping up to the plate. It just delivered anti-tank weapons to Ukraine. Germany, reverting to its traditional approach of accommodating Russian aggression to further its interests, reportedly refused Britain permission to transport the anti-tank weapons through German airspace. Germany denies doing so, but »

In Germany, the Knife-Edge Politics of Meh

Featured image Germany held its parliamentary election today, and the race between the retiring Angela Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union and the left’s Social Democrats is too close to call. The London Times reports: The chancellor’s conservatives were predicted to lose to the centre-left Social Democrats (SPD) by roughly a percentage point, although the outcome remained too close to call. *** The finely balanced results herald a phase of uncertainty that could drag »

About Those German Floods

Featured image Most people understand that leftists take advantage of real or alleged crises to expand their power. But an equally important phenomenon is that they use crises of various kinds to excuse their own incompetence. (Covid has served such a purpose over the last year and a half; it has become a near-universal excuse for failure of performance.) The recent floods in Germany, which killed more than 150 people, are a »

Merkel’s party hammered in two state elections

Featured image Germany’s ruling Christian Democrats (CDU) suffered big defeats in two state elections yesterday. It lost in both Baden-Württemberg and Rhineland-Palatinate, collecting only about one-fourth of the vote in each. Angela Merkel, the CDU leader, will be stepping down as chancellor. Yesterday’s results suggest that her successor as party leader may be in for a difficult time. Germany has been hit much less hard by the Wuhan coronavirus than have the »

Detention Centers For COVID Skeptics

Featured image Sure, it’s Germany. But don’t think it can’t happen here. If you have harbored the suspicion that covid hysteria is a Trojan horse for totalitarian control over our lives, Germany points the way forward: Germany to hold Covid rule breakers in REFUGEE CAMPS under new crackdown to stop Brit mutant virus explosion. GERMANY’S worst Covid rule breakers will be held in detention centres under new proposals being drawn up by »

It’s a sad day when the German chancellor has to lecture us about free speech

Featured image In the 1970s, my constitutional law professor, Gerald Gunther, was invited by the West German government to visit that country and to lecture on the American Constitution. Gunther and his family had fled Germany in the 1930s. When he returned home to California, Gunther commended the Germans as hosts and for what they were accomplishing as a society. However, he added that they still didn’t quite understand the importance of »

Germans March Against Shutdown

Featured image The Associated Press reports on opposition by Germans to their government’s shutdown order. The AP, of course, has a position on the issue: Thousands protested Germany’s coronavirus restrictions Saturday in a Berlin demonstration marking what organizers called “the end of the pandemic” — a declaration that comes just as authorities are voicing increasing concerns about an uptick in new infections. Got that? The demonstrators are wrong! The AP wouldn’t want »

All German stores to reopen this week, with soccer to follow soon

Featured image A week or two ago, it looked like German soccer would resume this coming weekend. That was the plan, but it did not receive approval from the government. Now, the government has approved a resumption of play in mid-May for Germany’s top two professional soccer league. Games will be played behind closed doors, with only around 300 people — players, coaches, referees, team officials and staff, broadcast crews — allowed »

Three approaches to reopening schools

Featured image Germany and France are set to reopen schools. However, the two nations are taking very different approaches. Germany is starting with two sets of students. Those about to move from primary school to secondary school and those about to take graduation/college entrance examinations will be the first back. Germany is still considering when other sets of students will be allowed to return. France will start with a much younger group »

German soccer set to recommence

Featured image The German Bundesliga is poised to become the first sports league I follow to go back to work. In fact, players are already at work. They are practicing in anticipation of matches to be played in early May. When the Bundesliga season came to a halt, teams had nine matches left to play. And, for once, there was a genuine race for the championship. Normally, Bayern Munich has the top »

The Wuhan coronavirus in Germany, Part Two

Featured image Yesterday, I wrote about how Germany’s coronavirus death numbers were extremely low compared to nearby countries. I noted that Germany had about the same number of reported cases as France (approximately 130,000 cases). Italy had about 155,000 cases. Spain had about 165,000. Yet, Germany was reporting only 3,022 deaths. France was reporting more than 14,000. Spain was reporting around 17,000 and Italy nearly 20,000. Looking at the numbers on a »

The Wuhan coronavirus in Germany

Featured image Germany has been in the coronavirus news lately because of a study from a town, Gangelt, that tested 80 percent of its population (of 11,634) for the virus. The study found that the infection morality rate was about 0.3 percent. (See here for criticism of the study.) Without wanting to discount this study, it may be worth noting that, since the early days of the pandemic, Germany has been reporting »