Impeachment

Who will preside over the Senate trial?

Featured image The effort by Democrats to impeach and convict President Trump is raising questions that, in a well-functioning society, would be reserved for law school exams. In such a society, Trump wouldn’t have acted as he did during his final days and Democrats would be content with the fact that those were his final days. One question raised is whether a president can be impeached after he leaves office. A second »

Few GOP Senators likely to vote for convicting Trump

Featured image On Election Day 1964, I handed out pro-Lyndon Johnson leaflets to voters at Connecticut Park Elementary school in Wheaton, Maryland. My friend Bruce stood nearby handing out pro-Barry Goldwater material. As he offered his literature, Bruce’s would say, “Good afternoon, sir (or ma’am), vote for Senator Goldwater.” The sirs and ma’ams seemed disinclined to follow Bruce’s advice. Most were stone faced. Some pushed back. “You’ve got to be kidding” and »

Gaffe of the Year

Featured image OK, the year is young. But Chuck Schumer’s classic moment on the Senate floor today promises to be a contender. First, the entertainment: SCHUMER: "Senators will have to decide if Donald John Trump incited the erection." pic.twitter.com/zL4UDs9UbK — Daily Caller (@DailyCaller) January 22, 2021 I will say that Trump has incited something of the sort in Democrats for the last four years. The more serious point here is that the »

On impeachment, Part Four, the House’s Article

Featured image The single Article of Impeachment passed by the House states, in pertinent part: INCITEMENT OF INSURRECTION On January 6, 2021, pursuant to the 12th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, the Vice President of the United States, the House of Representatives, and the Senate met at the United States Capitol for a Joint Session of Congress to count the votes of the Electoral College. In the months preceding »

On impeachment, Part Three, free speech

Featured image I want to distinguish between two main theories of impeaching President Trump. They are impeaching him for what he said about the election and impeaching him for what he told or encouraged people to do about the election’s outcome. The House of Representative’s article of impeachment mingles the two into a stew it hopes tastes and smells like insurrection. The potpourri is heavy on what Trump said about the election »

On impeachment, Part Two, some presumptions [UPDATED]

Featured image In this post on impeachment, I want to state some presumptions that I think should apply in impeachment proceedings, including the latest impeachment of President Trump. First, in my view, there should be a strong presumption against impeaching a president. The decision of who should be president is for the American people to make. The Constitution permits Congress to override that decision, but Congress should be very hesitant to use »

On impeachment, Part One

Featured image Nancy Pelosi undoubtedly is proud of the fact that Donald Trump is now the only U.S. president in history to have been impeached twice. However, it’s a distinction Trump is unlikely to hold for long. Impeachments are likely to become a cost of doing business for American presidents. Arguably, they already are. There have been three of them in the last four presidencies. Two of the last four presidents have »

McConnell’s statement

Featured image Mitch McConnell remains the Senate Majority Leader until the new administration takes office next week. Following the impeachment of President Trump yesterday, Senator McConnell issued the following statement regarding the Senate schedule: The House of Representatives has voted to impeach the President. The Senate process will now begin at our first regular meeting following receipt of the article from the House. Given the rules, procedures, and Senate precedents that govern »

Not the Most Evil Political Act of My Lifetime…

Featured image …but perhaps the dumbest. Impeachment, that is. It is fitting, in a weird way, that the Democrats talked about impeaching President Trump before he was inaugurated, and now have actually impeached him for the second time when he is about to leave office, and the impeachment can have no practical effect. Neither in 2016 nor today did impeachment relate to anything other than the irrational, visceral hatred that Democrats have »

Impeachment for the hell of it

Featured image Watching the House impeach President Trump for the second time today, a week before Trump’s scheduled departure from office, I was reminded of the title of Abbie Hoffman’s book Revolution for the Hell of It. This was Impeachment for the Hell of It. The whole impeachment thing has become a matter of political theater, about as serious as Nancy Pelosi’s shredding of the text of Trump’s State of the Union »

The impeachment express rolls on

Featured image Democrats and their media complex have sought to remove President Trump from office since the day he became president. The day before yesterday the pretext was the Russia hoax. It was a day that lasted three long years, but put that to one side. Yesterday it was the Ukraine piffle (as Michael Goodwin calls it) and impeachment, round 1. Today, as Trump’s term in office comes to a close, it »

Impeachment Follies [Updated]

Featured image Ridiculous though it may be, Nancy Pelosi apparently is serious about impeaching President Trump. This will have zero practical effect, of course, since he is leaving office in a week. It is just an expression of the insane hatred that motivates so much of what the Democratic Party does. Impeachment after the fact has precedents. In medieval Europe, death did not make one safe from charges of heresy. An alleged »

Podcast: Special Edition—Should Trump Be Impeached?

Featured image I was caught up short yesterday when I spotted, on the generally very pro-Trump American Greatness website, William B. Allen’s article entitled “Let Us Impeach Him.” It pays to read past the headline of this article, because the argument is not what you think: it’s not a “get-him-out-office-as-fast-as-we-can” manifesto. Rather, Prof. Allen argues that we should take our time and impeach Trump after he leaves office, thereby allowing scope for »

Another impeachment?

Featured image Nancy Pelosi is talking about impeaching President Trump if he isn’t removed (which he won’t be). She might do it. She has the votes. However, impeaching Trump would be a meaningless gesture. There isn’t enough time before January 20 for the Senate to have a trial even if Mitch McConnell were inclined to hold one. Rich Lowry says it’s “technically possible to impeach an official after he has left office.” »

That schiffty Mr. Schiff

Featured image I wrote this past December about House Intelligence Committee Adam Schiff’s acquisition of telephone records used in the committee’s “impeachment inquiry report” here (part 1), here (part 2), here (part 3), and here (part 4). In those posts I tried to infer the underlying facts from the “impeachment inquiry report.” We were nevertheless left hanging. How did Schiff do that? Kim Strassel follows up this week in her Wall Street »

House lacks standing to enforce McGahn subpoena, appeals court rules [UPDATED]

Featured image As Scott noted this post, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled yesterday that that Article III of the Constitution forbids federal courts from resolving the dispute between the House of Representatives and the executive branch over whether former White House Counsel Don McGahn must comply with a subpoena to testify before the House. The decision is, of course, a victory for President Trump. It means »

On the removal of Sondland and Vindman

Featured image Two of the key witnesses in the Trump impeachment have been removed from their positions. Gordon Sondland is out as Ambassador to the European Union. Lt. Col Alexander Vindman has been reassigned from the National Security Council to the Pentagon. Democrats are crying foul, of course. But was it improper for Trump to take these personnel actions? Sondland’s case seems easy to me. Ambassadors serve at the pleasure of the »