Loretta Lynch

Loretta Lynch Confirmed With Ten Republican Votes

Featured image The Senate voted 56-43 this afternoon to confirm Loretta Lynch as Attorney General. Ten Republicans voted for confirmation: Kelly Ayotte, Ron Johnson, Mark Kirk, Rob Portman, Thad Cochran, Susan Collins, Jeff Flake, Lindsey Graham, Orrin Hatch and Mitch McConnell. No doubt other Republicans put out statements explaining their opposition to Lynch, but I got these from Jeff Sessions and Marco Rubio, and thought they were both worth passing on. Senator »

Obama is right, the Republican Senate is embarrassing

Featured image On Friday, President Obama lashed out at the Republican Senate for not confirming Loretta Lynch as Attorney General. “There are times where the dysfunction in the Senate just goes too far,” Obama scolded. “This is an example of it.” Doing his best impression of Harrison Ford in “Witness,” Obama huffed: Enough, enough. Call Loretta Lynch for a vote, get her confirmed, let her do her job. This is embarrassing. You »

Correction on Loretta Lynch

Featured image I just put up a post claiming that Loretta Lynch, the pending nominee for Attorney General of the United States, was the Clinton campaign staffer who, in 1992, compiled Team Clinton’s version of Hillary Clinton’s relationship with crooked banker Jim McDougal and of her involvement as a lawyer for McDougal’s Castle Grande scam. The post was erroneous. A different Loretta Lynch served the Clintons in this capacity. I apologize for »

Is Lindsey Graham a victim of “McCarthyism”?

Featured image He seems to think so. Responding to criticism by opponents of the Loretta Lynch nomination, Sen. Graham complained: Joe McCarthy said, if you don’t agree with me that that guy is a communist, then you’re a communist. I don’t buy that kind of logic. I don’t support the executive order. I don’t know whether McCarthy made the argument Graham ascribes to him, but opponents of the Lynch nomination aren’t using »

Loretta Lynch declines to answer

Featured image In her confirmation hearing last week, Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch declined to elaborate her views on the president’s power to suspend enforcement of federal law. Obama has not only done so with respect to immigration law, he has established an administrative apparatus to implement the regularization of millions of illegals. Once upon a time, the illegality of such conduct would have been widely understood, relentlessly condemned and intensely resisted. »

Thank you for that non-answer, nominee

Featured image As I watched Loretta Lynch’s testimony yesterday, I had the feeling I had seen this act before. Her approach to answering questions, her tone, and some of her word choices left me with a strong sense of deja vu. Only in the evening did I realize where I had seen Lynch’s act. It was during the confirmation hearing of Cornelia Pillard, now a judge on the D.C. Circuit. Like Pillard, »

The Hatch hemorrhage

Featured image Live blogging yesterday’s Judiciary Committee hearing on the confirmation of Loretta Lynch as attorney general, Paul noted that Senator Hatch expressed his hopes that he would be able to vote to confirm Lynch. “I hope he won’t,” Paul added, “but after hearing his questioning, I fear he will.” Last night Senator Hatch’s press secretary sent us a message including a video (below) of Senator Hatch’s questioning of Lynch. The press »

Loretta Lynch Must Not Be Confirmed [Updated]

Featured image The President’s duty under the Constitution is to “take care that the laws be faithfully executed.” The Attorney General is the President’s chief agent in that regard. With respect to immigration, the laws of the United States set forth the manner in which immigrants may lawfully enter and remain within the United States. Numerous persons are here in violation of those laws. The laws of the United States further provide »

Live-blogging the Lynch hearing — afternoon edition, starring Ted Cruz

Featured image Loretta Lynch did a superb job of testifying this morning. She artfully ducked the few tough questions directed to her, while somehow managing to sound like the most accommodating nominee ever. Only Sen. Sessions laid a glove on her, in my opinion. The afternoon session will begin soon. I think I’ll present my live-blogging of this one in chronological order rather than reverse chronological order, as I did this morning. »

Live-blogging the Lynch hearing

Featured image Loretta Lynch’s confirmation hearing is about to start. I’ll live-blog it for a few hours at least. I’ll keep the most recent entries at the top for those who want to keep up with the blow-by-blow. Others should read from the bottom up. Here goes: 12:39 Sen. Amy Klobuchar is up. A lunch break will follow. I will start mine early, and resume the live-blogging this afternoon. The Republican questioning »

Sharyl Attkisson to testify on Lynch confirmation, but why?

Featured image Loretta Lynch, President Obama’s nominee for Attorney General, will testify tomorrow before the Senate Judiciary Committee. It should be an interesting day. Coming up with lists of questions to ask Lynch has become a cottage industry. I offered my entry in November: I hope that during Senate confirmation hearings, Lynch will be asked specifically about each issue as to which the Holder DOJ has applied or considered applying disparate impact »

Has Loretta Lynch violated the rights of crime victims?

Featured image Although, we have criticized the nomination of Loretta Lynch as Attorney General on a number of grounds, there’s one substantial criticism that I’m not sure we have raised. Lynch appears to have made plea deals with white collar criminals that violated the rights of crime victims. A group of conservative leaders and activists have raised this concern in a letter to Senator Grassley, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. They »

Questions for Loretta Lynch

Featured image George Will offers a list of questions he thinks Senators should put to Loretta Lynch, President Obama’s nominee for Attorney General. The purpose of the questions, Will says, is to “highlight festering legal problems.” The first question pertains to attempts by the federal government to “coerce colleges and universities into jettisoning crucial defendants’ protections when adjudicating, in improvised tribunals, accusations of sexual assault.” The question is well worth asking if »

Marco Rubio and Loretta Lynch, a correction

Featured image I have written that Sen. Marco Rubio reportedly has expressed an inclination to vote to confirm Loretta Lynch as Attorney General. However, a member of the Senator’s staff assures me that this is not the case. He says that, in fact, Rubio has a standing policy of not taking positions on nominees until they have gone through the committee process. Rubio has said only that Lynch’s position on President Obama’s »

How Eric Holder tried to showcase Loretta Lynch

Featured image Republican Senators, including Marco Rubio, reportedly have expressed an inclination to confirm Loretta Lynch as Attorney General. But given Lynch’s similarities to, and connections with, Eric Holder, a vote to confirm Lynch would be an endorsement of the Holder Justice Department (not to mention the executive amnesty). This article by the National Legal and Policy Center (NLPC) describes how Eric Holder tried to showcase Lynch by enabling her to take »

Loretta Lynch: soft on political corruption, perfect Obama AG

Featured image Loretta Lynch, President Obama’s nominee for Attorney General, is the United States Attorney for the Eastern District of New York. Team Obama is hoping that her status as a prosecutor will help her through the confirmation process. Republicans would do well to remember that Eric Holder was also a U.S. Attorney. Aspects of Lynch’s record as prosecutor bring Eric Holder to mind. This article by the National Legal and Policy »

Questions for Marco Rubio about Loretta Lynch

Featured image Loretta Lynch, President Obama’s nominee for Attorney General, is making the rounds on Capitol Hill in advance of her upcoming Senate confirmation hearing. With the GOP now in control of the Senate, she will need some Republican support. But with the elimination of the filibuster in this context, only a few Republican defectors will be required. They probably will be easy to find. Lindsey Graham, true to his role as »