Podcasts

Podcast: The 3WHH on Tanking Ukraine

Featured image Many of The Federalist Papers bear the title, “The Same Subject Continued,” and with a lot of news about the Ukrainian situation coming out this week, we decided to continue last week’s vigorous argument over Ukraine with some of the new facts, such as how much of our own munitions inventory is being drawn down to supply Ukraine (see chart below), the decision to send Abrams tanks, the news that »

Podcast: Power Line University, Lesson 5: The Separation of Powers in Federalist 47 – 51

Featured image This week we continued our leisurely stroll through The Federalist with an extended look at Federalist numbers 47 through 51, which explain the key concept of the separation of powers—a phrase that is nowhere found in the text of the Constitution, but which is clearly implied by the design and structure of the text. But Madison and Hamilton leave nothing to chance, citing “the celebrated Montesquieu” as a theoretical authority, »

Podcast: Classic Format Conversation with Jean Yarbrough & Dan Lowenstein on the Liberal Arts

Featured image This classic format episode features a conversation with Dan Lowenstein, professor emeritus at UCLA Law School and, more importantly, the impresario of UCLA’s Center for the Liberal Arts and Free Institutions (CLAFI), which he founded, and one of our favorites at Power Line, Jean Yarbrough of Bowdoin College. Prof. Yarbrough was in town for three days to deliver a fabulous lecture comparing Lincoln and Tocqueville on slavery, and then a small »

Live Podcast Tomorrow: PLU Lesson 5, Federalist 47 – 51

Featured image We’re going to have this week’s Power Line University online class on The Federalist tomorrow (Tuesday) instead of Wednesday for scheduling reasons. Lucretia and I will meet live at 4:30 pm Pacific time, and go through the major question of the separation of powers as explained in Federalist numbers 47 – 51. Use this Zoom link to join us. Although Montesquieu had explained the theory of the separation of powers »

Podcast: The 3WHH on Freaks, Geeks, Leaks, and Ukrainamania

Featured image This week’s raucous episode, recorded well after conventional happy hour usually ends, ranged from Biden’s dementia to the failed Dobbs leak investigation, to Kevin McCarthy’s (relatively) good week, the post hockey ergo propter hockey fallacy, bidding good riddance to one of the premier COVID cultists, a defense of cat-calling (even when it’s done to our Lucretia), and then . . . a big fat argument about Ukraine. The vigorous disagreements among »

Podcast: Power Line University, Lesson 4—Federalists 33 – 45

Featured image This week’s PLU class resumes our leisurely stroll through The Federalist starting with Federalists #33 and #37, and the “partly federal, partly national” character of the Union under the proposed Constitution—a subject that remains as confusing and contentious today as it was then. Lucretia walks us through how the issue began to settle out starting with the landmark 1819 case of McCulloch v. Maryland. We also have a lively discussion of the »

Podcast: The 3WHH Rummages Joe’s Garage and Remembers Paul Johnson

Featured image John Yoo is away this week, so Hillsdale historian Richard Samuelson joins the Three Whisky Happy Hour for an extended discussion of the passing of Paul Johnson, and especially why he deserves to be considered one of the premier historians of all time. But first we rummage around in Joe’s garage (Joe Biden that is), where the lyrics to Frank Zappa’s tune by that name seem appropriate: This is the »

Podcast: The 3WHH on the Last Pope, the Next Speaker, and Hobbes

Featured image We recorded a day early this week because I have to travel (supposedly—the airlines are not cooperating—again). Only the 3WHH bartenders could possibly draw the connecting thread between the subjects of the passing of Pope Benedict XVI, the drama over the next Speaker of the House, and Thomas Hobbes. But with the help of a little fine whisky, we’re up to the job! Lucretia and I give the Protestant John »

Podcast: Scott Atlas on our COVID Folly

Featured image The response to COVID is arguably the single greatest public policy mistake in American history, which in turn became a global catastrophe since so many other nations followed the United States with foolish lockdowns, school closures, and other authoritarian measures that were ineffective and heedless of adverse tradeoffs. Dr. Scott Atlas of Stanford’s Hoover Institution has been vilified for his dissent from the party line on COVID, most fully explained »

Podcast: The 3WHH Celebrates New Years

Featured image John Yoo serves as lead bartender for this gala new year’s eve edition of the Three Whisky Happy Hour, though he was nearly deposed for arriving late and then taunting us with pics of his Korean new year’s feast (see nearby). To ring out 2022 and look ahead to 2023, we cover some new whisky choices (which in John’s case included some very old port by special exception found in »

Podcast: Michael Anton Picks Up the Gauntlet

Featured image And yet another bonus holiday episode for everyone to savor before the college football bowl games arrive. . . “Human rights do not exist,” claims an anonymous dissident conservative writer, but when he (at least we’re going to identify the author as a “he”—heh) added some animadversions about our pal Michael Anton, the fight was on! Anton has responded at length to this provocation with a true tour de force »

Podcast: PLU Lesson One—The Federalist, Nos 1 – 9

Featured image Lucretia and I held the first “classroom” for PLU (Power Line University) yesterday, with 110 people ultimately tuning in live for our first formal session on The Federalist Papers. We had a couple of technical difficulties—for some reason we kept failing to get the Chat window working right—and we had some hiccups admitting some live questions and comments from viewers, but we hope to have these ironed out for our »

Podcast: Sci-Fi-Palooza—Star Trek vs. “Woke Trek”

Featured image Who knew that John Yoo is a total science fiction geek?! I’m going to have to go back and scour his law review article footnotes to see if I can detect esoteric references to Sci-Fi classics, with which, it turns out, he has thoroughly familiarity. Ken Green channeling Jayne Cobb. Some time last year I did a podcast on science fiction with my old AEI writing partner Ken Green (who »

Podcast: The 3WHH Celebrates Stanford’s Christmas List

Featured image As you may have heard, Stanford “University” embarrassed itself this week by issuing a list of 160 words or phrases that you shouldn’t use because they are not sufficiently “inclusive” or sensitive, including even “trigger warning,” because, Stanford helpfully explained, “The phrase can cause stress about what’s to follow. Additionally, one can never know what may or may not trigger a particular person.” And although “American” is among the terms Stanford »

Podcast: Introducing “Power Line University”

Featured image I get a steady stream of emails from readers and listeners who want to know if any of my or Lucretia’s college courses are webcast or otherwise available online, and unfortunately the answer is No, partly for legal reasons but also for some technical reasons (streaming live classes is not as easy as it might seem, and the recording quality is often poor). But we have for the longest time »

Podcast: Carpe Diem!, with Mark Perry

Featured image What do you do when you wake up and see the news story of how the University of North Carolina is once again violating the Civil Rights Act of 1964 with a scholarship that specifically excludes white students from eligibility? Your first thought is that you need to call Mark Perry, except he’s already on the job! Perry, professor emeritus of economics and finance at the University of Michigan/Flint, filed »

Podcast: The 3WHH—Can Elections Be Fixed (and Not Just Rigged)?

Featured image John Yoo is back at last from his latest Italian junket—yes, Lucretia let him back across the border unharmed!—and hosts this week’s episode of the Three Whisky Happy Hour in which we clarify some of the over-hasty arguments from last week’s highly thymotic episode (as many readers noted!) about exactly when and how it is legitimate to contest the Supreme Court over the application of the Constitution. This opening elided »