Racial Preferences

Buttigieg’s pander: a Marshall Plan for black America

Featured image Pete Buttigieg soared from obscurity to third place (at one time) in the Democratic race for the presidency. His candidacy struck me as interesting for about a week. Then, I realized that he’s just another left-wing Democrat, distinguished from the rest of the field primarily because he happens to be gay. And he has fallen back in the polls. Even at its peak, the Buttigieg campaign faced a huge problem »

A question for Joe Biden

Featured image Joe Biden says he has nothing to atone for over his opposition to school busing in the 1970s. He adds that this is an issue with which 99 percent of Americans are unfamiliar. Biden is right on the first count. He need not apologize for opposing a regime that was unwise and unpopular. Good for him for refusing to do so. I would be more impressed if he didn’t couch »

The “adversity score” gambit

Featured image I want to add a few observations to those of Scott and Heather Mac Donald regarding the “adversity score” that the College Board offers to provide to colleges along with applicants’ SAT scores. First, college admissions offices already know the information that yields this score. Charles Deacon, the dean of undergraduate admissions at Georgetown acknowledged: We have so much personal data on all our applicants that we don’t feel the »

How Montgomery County, Maryland discriminates against Asians

Featured image I wrote here about how the federal government is probing the Montgomery County School system to determine whether it is discriminating against Asian-American students by limiting their admission into two highly sought-after magnet school programs. Between 2016 and 2017, the number of Asian-American students admitted into the two programs dropped by 23 percent. The next year, it dropped again, this time by 20 percent. One reason for the sharp decline »

Feds to probe discrimination against Asians in Montgomery County Schools

Featured image Like a great many school districts, Montgomery County, Maryland has magnet programs for its top students. Students from outside the normal neighborhood boundaries of a school can be admitted to the programs. Selection is supposed to be based on merit. Between 2016 and 2017, the number of Asian-American students admitted into two sought-after middle school magnet programs in Montgomery County dropped by 23 percent. The next year, it dropped again, »

Lessons and non-lessons from the college admissions scandal

Featured image The college admission fraud revelations are a scandal of some significance. The fraudulent behavior was reprehensible and fairly widespread. There are lessons to be learned. I agree with Heather Mac Donald that the two main ones are that “an elite college degree has taken on wildly inflated importance in American society, and the sports-industrial complex enjoys wildly inflated power within universities.” However, some of the lessons being extracted from the »

The college-admissions fraud

Featured image It seems like last year, but it was only last week that United States Attorney for Massachusetts Andrew Lelling announced the indictments and related arrests in the college admissions bribery scheme dubbed Operation Varsity Blues by the authorities. The Department of Justice has posted a press release with links to the charging documents filed so far here. It lists 50 defendants. Lelling held a big press conference with the FBI »

DNA testing and college admission

Featured image Inside Higher Ed reports that some parents are having their children take DNA tests to prove they are black (or some other preferred minority) in order to enhance their chances of being admitted to the college of their choice. There’s nothing surprising about this trend. Given the massive advantage they confer on blacks, colleges are hard pressed to take the word of applicants that they are in that category if »

What it’s like to apply to Ivy League schools in the era of affirmative discrimination

Featured image The video below follows three similarly situated high school students from the same New Jersey school who applied for early admission to Ivy League schools. One of the students is Asian. He applied to Penn. Another is Black. He applied to Princeton. The third is half Asian and half White. He also applied to Princeton, reluctantly “confessing” to the school that he’s part Asian. The video talks to the students »

Racial discrimination, Harvard style

Featured image At its 2018 National Lawyers Convention this past Friday, the Federalist Society sponsored one of its characteristically excellent panels featuring diverse points of view — this one on the 2014 lawsuit challenging Harvard’s sophisticated program of racial discrimination in undergraduate admissions. The lawsuit was brought by Students for Fair Admissions against Harvard alleging that Harvard was violating Title VI of the Civil Rights Act by, among other things, discriminating against »

Harvard: Stop Pretending!

Featured image As the lawsuit by Asian-American students against Harvard proceeds, our friend David Lebedoff–one of whose degrees is from Harvard, if I remember correctly–weighs in, with Harvard’s motto, Veritas, as his polar star: Karl Marx, who today’s undergraduates think was that curly-headed guy honking at Groucho, proclaimed in his own turbulent time that “History repeats itself, first as tragedy, second as farce.” Well, he had to get something right. But who »

DOJ sides with plaintiff alleging discrimination by Harvard against Asians

Featured image The Department of Justice today filed a Statement of Interest on the side of the plaintiff in Students For Fair Admissions, Inc. v. Harvard College. Students For Fair Admissions, an organization of students and parents, alleges that Harvard intentionally discriminates against Asian-American applicants when making admissions decisions. The Justice Department opened a Title VI investigation into Harvard’s admissions process in 2017 based upon a complaint filed by more than 60 »

Affirmative action today…(2)

Featured image Word comes today via Michelle Hackman’s Wall Street Journal story that the Trump administration is planning to rescind “a set of Obama-era policies that encourage the use of race in college admissions to promote diverse educational settings[.]” Hackman tacfully couches her report in the euphemisms that enshroud the practice of racial discrimination in the name of “affirmative action.” Hackman does not link to either of the two Obama administration guidance »

Sometimes it’s the crime you didn’t commit that nails you

Featured image That’s the theme, or at least the punchline, of Preston Sturges’ classic movie “The Great McGinty,” among other works of art. It may also end up being the kicker in the class action lawsuit against Harvard for discriminating against Asian-Americans in undergraduate admissions. Harvard wants to admit African-Americans and Latinos more or less in proportion to their representation in the U.S. population. It can’t do so if it makes admissions »

Is this the Sandra Day O’Connor moment?

Featured image In Grutter v. Bollinger, the Supreme Court upheld the use of race-based preferences by the University of Michigan Law School, The vote was 5-4. In her majority opinion, Justice O’Connor concluded that the University has a compelling interest in promoting diversity in the classroom. However, O’Connor also said: [A]ll governmental use of race must have a logical end point. We expect that 25 years from now, the use of racial »

Harvard’s experts undercut the case for race-based admissions

Featured image Charles Lane of the Washington Post discusses the suit brought by Asian-American plaintiffs charging Harvard with racial discrimination in undergraduate admissions. The column is from the “on the one hand this, on the other hand that” school of opinion writing — not a despicable approach, either in general or to this topic. To me, the most interesting bit of information in Lane’s column is this: Harvard’s expert witness told the »

Statistics establish Harvard’s discrimination against Asian-Americans

Featured image John wrote here about the class action lawsuit that accuses Harvard of discriminating against Asian-Americans in admissions. The plaintiffs have moved for summary judgment, arguing that they should prevail based on facts not genuinely in dispute. One fact not genuinely in dispute is that Harvard’s own researchers found statistical evidence that the University’s undergraduate application process discriminates against Asian-Americans. In 2013, the Harvard Office of Institutional Research found that Asian-Americans »