Racial Preferences

DoJ to Yale: Stop discriminating

Featured image One gets the impression that in important respects the Trump administration is just beginning to fire on all cylinders. A brilliant and fully functioning Attorney General heading up the Department of Justice is at least one of those cylinders. Yesterday, for example, Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights Eric Dreiband notified Yale University of the department’s findings that Yale illegally discriminates against Asian American and white applicants in its undergraduate »

The left’s agenda on race

Featured image Roger Clegg offers seven thoughts for 7/7. One of them is this: Some statues will come down, and some will stay, and the impact on black lives will be precisely zero. The Left has gotten people’s attention about (fictive) “systemic racism,” and its agenda turns out to be defunding the police and tearing down statues — what more do we need to know about how silly it is? I agree »

Gaming Out the Left’s Race Strategy From Here

Featured image Before the George Floyd’s death a month ago perhaps the leading story in race relations was the growing momentum in California to roll back the voter-approved prohibition on racial preferences in public contracting and university admissions. The University of California has taken the first step with its decision to abolish the SAT and ACT tests for admission purposes (against the recommendation of the faculty, incidentally), with the substitute screens for admission »

What I believe

Featured image Larry Bacow, the president of Harvard, blasted this email to members of the Harvard Community: The last several months have been disorienting for all of us. COVID-19 has profoundly disrupted the lives of people worldwide. It has caused more than 365,000 deaths around the globe and more than 100,000 in the United States alone. Forty million Americans have lost their jobs, and countless others live in fear of both the »

NFL considers offering incentives to discriminate on the basis of race [UPDATED]

Featured image Today, the National Football League is considering a proposal to enable teams to improve their draft position by hiring minority candidates for coaching and executive positions. As I understand the proposal, a team that hires a minority head coach would move up six spots in the third round of the following year’s draft. Hiring a minority general manager would enable a team to move up ten spots in that round. »

A move to reinstate racial preferences in California

Featured image California Proposition 209, enacted by the state’s voters in 1996, amended the California Constitution to prohibit public institutions from discriminating on the basis of race, sex, or ethnicity. Now, the California legislature is considering legislation to reinstate racial preferences. That legislation, Assembly Constitutional Amendment 5 (ACA 5), would repeal Prop. 209. The text is here. The legislation tries to paint a grim picture of educational prospects for blacks and Latinos »

Trump DOJ weighs in against Harvard’s discrimination

Featured image The Trump Department of Justice has steadfastly opposed racial discrimination without regard to which racial group is the victim. Yesterday, pursuant to this policy, the DOJ filed an amicus brief on behalf of the Asian-American plaintiffs who were discriminated against as a result of Harvard University’s race-based admissions preferences for African-American applicants. The case is on appeal from a district court ruling that found no discrimination by Harvard. We discussed »

CRB: The invention of Hispanics

Featured image We have been celebrating the twentieth year of publication of the second coming of the Claremont Review of Books with its new (Fall) issue. The magazine has moved to a new site with a new URL (claremontreviewofbooks.com). The editors have made the new issue freely accessible for the next few days. They hope to entice readers to become subscribers (subscribe here). I am, as usual, previewing a few reviews and »

How to restore Washington State’s ban on racial preferences

Featured image Way back in 1998, voters in the State of Washington approved Initiative 200 by a margin 58 to 42 percent. Initiative 200 was a clone of California’s Proposition 209. It prohibited the state from discriminating against or granting preferential treatment to any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity or national origin in the operation of public employment, public education, or public contracting. However, as Gail »

Racial discrimination forever, Harvard edition

Featured image Scott has already written about the decision in Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard, which upholds excluding many Asian-American applicants to Harvard who, by all objective criteria should be admitted, on the theory that they fit the stereotype of being, in effect, too serious. Harvard doesn’t really think the Asian-American applicants are too serious. It just needs an excuse for keeping a lid on the number of Asian-Americans at Harvard »

The Power Line Show, Ep. 143: Heather Mac Donald’s Greatest Hits

Featured image This special double-length episode features a wide-ranging conversation with best-selling author and iconoclast Heather Mac Donald of the Manhattan Institute, with special focus on her new book, The Diversity Delusion: How Race and Gender Pandering Corrupt the University and Undermine Our Culture. I hosted Heather this week at  . . . UC Berkeley (!!), and we decided that rather than going with a set-piece speech, I’d interview her about the »

The Week @ Berkeley

Featured image For our Bay Area readers, the fourth year of my sentence as an inmate at UC Berkeley has started as of last week, and I’m teaching an undergraduate course on conservative perspectives on public policy issues that meets at 8:30 am on Tuesdays and Thursdays. I have plenty of empty seats in the classroom (room 250 at the Goldman School of Public Policy on Hearst Street on the north side »

Bidding for black votes, sometimes it’s not easy even for Democrats

Featured image I’ve mentioned before that it’s difficult, if not impossible, for Republicans to win the votes of African-Americans through policy proposals. These voters are loyal to the Democratic party. In any case, the Dems invariably will outbid the GOP through more blatant race conscious policies than the ones Republicans propose. Democrats too can find it difficult to bid for black votes — when they are running against each other. Take the »

Do governments have a duty to reduce racial gaps?

Featured image John has demonstrated how the Washington Post lied about a statement Katherine Kersten made regarding racial discipline quotas in the St. Paul school system. The lie appears in an article by Rebecca Tan called “Racial gaps prove hard to reduce.” On the internet, the article is called “Local governments are trying to fix racial inequity. But the path forward isn’t clear.” John’s attack on Tan’s dishonest reporting is spot on. »

Buttigieg’s pander: a Marshall Plan for black America

Featured image Pete Buttigieg soared from obscurity to third place (at one time) in the Democratic race for the presidency. His candidacy struck me as interesting for about a week. Then, I realized that he’s just another left-wing Democrat, distinguished from the rest of the field primarily because he happens to be gay. And he has fallen back in the polls. Even at its peak, the Buttigieg campaign faced a huge problem »

A question for Joe Biden

Featured image Joe Biden says he has nothing to atone for over his opposition to school busing in the 1970s. He adds that this is an issue with which 99 percent of Americans are unfamiliar. Biden is right on the first count. He need not apologize for opposing a regime that was unwise and unpopular. Good for him for refusing to do so. I would be more impressed if he didn’t couch »

The “adversity score” gambit

Featured image I want to add a few observations to those of Scott and Heather Mac Donald regarding the “adversity score” that the College Board offers to provide to colleges along with applicants’ SAT scores. First, college admissions offices already know the information that yields this score. Charles Deacon, the dean of undergraduate admissions at Georgetown acknowledged: We have so much personal data on all our applicants that we don’t feel the »