Racial Preferences

DOJ draws non-liberal judge in suit against Yale

Featured image I wrote here about the Department of Justice’s suit against Yale University for race discrimination in undergraduate admissions. The action was filed in federal district court in Connecticut. The DOJ has strong evidence of unlawful discrimination. As importantly, the case falls within the jurisdiction of a reasonably hospitable court of appeals (the Second Circuit), with the prospect of ultimately being decided by a Supreme Court that (assuming it isn’t packed) »

S.F. Bay area sports teams support racial discrimination

Featured image California’s constitution provides: The state shall not discriminate against, or grant preferential treatment to, any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity or national origin in the operation of public employment, public education, and public contracting. Less controversial language is difficult to imagine in a nation or a state that hasn’t lost its way. That’s why Proposition 16, the left’s attempt to repeal California’s ban on »

Classroom learning for Blacks, online learning for Whites?

Featured image In August, the Illinois school district that encompasses Evanston announced its plans for a limited opening in September. Expecting that, given the pandemic, not enough teachers would return to schools, the district superintendent said that priority for attending classes in person would go to “Black and Brown students,” and others he considered to “marginalized” or “oppressed.” In other words, key educational opportunities would be granted and denied on the basis »

Race discrimination at Yale

Featured image Last week, I reported that the Department of Justice has sued Yale University for discriminating against Whites and Asian-Americans in undergraduate admissions. Today, I want to look more specifically at what the DOJ’s complaint alleges. At the outset, it’s worth noting the differences between the DOJ’s race discrimination suit against Yale and the race discrimination suit brought by private plaintiffs against Harvard. My sense is that the Harvard case was »

Trump-Barr Justice Department sues Yale for discriminating in admissions

Featured image The Department of Justice has sued Yale University for race and national origin discrimination in undergraduate admissions. The DOJ alleges that Yale’s discrimination imposes undue and unlawful penalties on racially-disfavored applicants, in particular most Asian and White applicants. According to the complaint, Yale engages in racial balancing by, among other things, keeping the annual percentage of African-American admitted applicants to within one percentage point of the previous year’s admitted class »

Please help preserve California’s ban on discrimination by the state

Featured image Last week, I wrote about California’s Proposition 16. It’s an attempt to remove the ban on racial preferences from the state’s constitution. Here is the language, added by the voters in 1996, that Prop 16 would eliminate: The state shall not discriminate against, or grant preferential treatment to, any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity or national origin in the operation of public employment, pubic »

Ginsburg’s alleged “blind spot”

Featured image On Wednesday, an army of Justice Ginsburg’s former law clerks, all dressed in black, honored their mentor by lining up as “honorary pallbearers” on the front steps of the Supreme Court when her casket arrived. It was an impressive display. However, Christian Mitchell, Illinois’ Deputy Governor, noticed a “jarring lack of ppl of color” among the former Ginsburg clerks. This wasn’t because African-American former Ginsburg clerks declined to serve as »

Poll: California voters don’t want racial preferences reinstated

Featured image In 1996, voters in California passed Proposition 209, which amended the state’s constitution to prohibit public institutions from discriminating on the basis of race, sex, or ethnicity. I wrote about the beneficial effects of Prop 209, including higher graduation rates for Blacks and Latinos, in this post. This year, Californians will vote on Proposition 16, an attempt to remove the ban on racial preferences from the state’s constitution. Prop 16 »

Asian victims of Harvard’s discrimination get day in court

Featured image This week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit heard argument in the case against Harvard University brought by Students for Fair Admissions. The plaintiffs allege that Harvard’s use of racial preferences results in discrimination against Asian-American applicants. The liberal district court judge who tried the case disagreed. She found for Harvard. You can listen to the oral argument here. The plaintiff-appellants were represented by William Consovoy. Assistant »

Antiracism at Cornell

Featured image Legal Insurrection documents Cornell University’s swing to the left over the issue of race. Cornell University has joined a growing list of universities embracing “antiracist” activism, a euphemism for race-based advocacy. Antiracism does not mean non-racist. It is a term of art used, most famously, in the book How to Be An Antiracist, which is being used as a teaching tool at universities throughout the country, including Cornell, and forms »

Parents sue Montgomery County schools over race discrimination

Featured image I’ve written before about how Montgomery County, Maryland, where I live, discriminates against Asian-Americans in education. The discrimination consists of limiting the number of Asian-Americans admitted to the County’s “magnet” programs for gifted students. The County wants more Black and Latino students in these programs. To achieve this, it admits these students based on lower standards than are required for other applicants. The result is the exclusion of some Asian-Americans »

Resentment, Critical Race Theory, and the war on standards

Featured image In the mid-1960s, when colleges began admitting black students who didn’t meet the standards applied to white ones, some observers presciently warned that the students admitted based on race preferences would carry a stigma. To my knowledge, however, no one one was prescient enough to realize that, in response, Blacks would try to stigmatize Whites — including those granting them the benefit of preferential treatment and those suffering the burdens »

Asian-American “experts” back discrimination against Asian-Americans

Featured image Asian-Americans comprise the group most acutely victimized when colleges and universities dole out preferences in admission to African-Americans. The reason is obvious. Racial preferences minimize merit, as it has always been judged in this context — grades, test scores, and extra-curricular activities — and Asian-American students as a group are the most meritorious large racial/ethnic group of high school students. Thus, it’s not surprising when lawsuits challenging preferential admission policies »

Summer of our discontent

Featured image City Journal has just posted the lead essay from its Summer issue online. By Heather Mac Donald, the essay is “Conformity to a lie.” Subhead: “Academia’s monolithic belief in systemic racism will further erode American institutions and the principles of our civilization.” The essay opens: The lethal arrest of George Floyd in Minneapolis in late May triggered widespread riots and a torrent of contempt for America from virtually every institution »

DoJ to Yale: Stop discriminating

Featured image One gets the impression that in important respects the Trump administration is just beginning to fire on all cylinders. A brilliant and fully functioning Attorney General heading up the Department of Justice is at least one of those cylinders. Yesterday, for example, Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights Eric Dreiband notified Yale University of the department’s findings that Yale illegally discriminates against Asian American and white applicants in its undergraduate »

The left’s agenda on race

Featured image Roger Clegg offers seven thoughts for 7/7. One of them is this: Some statues will come down, and some will stay, and the impact on black lives will be precisely zero. The Left has gotten people’s attention about (fictive) “systemic racism,” and its agenda turns out to be defunding the police and tearing down statues — what more do we need to know about how silly it is? I agree »

Gaming Out the Left’s Race Strategy From Here

Featured image Before the George Floyd’s death a month ago perhaps the leading story in race relations was the growing momentum in California to roll back the voter-approved prohibition on racial preferences in public contracting and university admissions. The University of California has taken the first step with its decision to abolish the SAT and ACT tests for admission purposes (against the recommendation of the faculty, incidentally), with the substitute screens for admission »