Racial Preferences

How to restore Washington State’s ban on racial preferences

Featured image Way back in 1998, voters in the State of Washington approved Initiative 200 by a margin 58 to 42 percent. Initiative 200 was a clone of California’s Proposition 209. It prohibited the state from discriminating against or granting preferential treatment to any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity or national origin in the operation of public employment, public education, or public contracting. However, as Gail »

Racial discrimination forever, Harvard edition

Featured image Scott has already written about the decision in Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard, which upholds excluding many Asian-American applicants to Harvard who, by all objective criteria should be admitted, on the theory that they fit the stereotype of being, in effect, too serious. Harvard doesn’t really think the Asian-American applicants are too serious. It just needs an excuse for keeping a lid on the number of Asian-Americans at Harvard »

The Power Line Show, Ep. 143: Heather Mac Donald’s Greatest Hits

Featured image This special double-length episode features a wide-ranging conversation with best-selling author and iconoclast Heather Mac Donald of the Manhattan Institute, with special focus on her new book, The Diversity Delusion: How Race and Gender Pandering Corrupt the University and Undermine Our Culture. I hosted Heather this week at  . . . UC Berkeley (!!), and we decided that rather than going with a set-piece speech, I’d interview her about the »

The Week @ Berkeley

Featured image For our Bay Area readers, the fourth year of my sentence as an inmate at UC Berkeley has started as of last week, and I’m teaching an undergraduate course on conservative perspectives on public policy issues that meets at 8:30 am on Tuesdays and Thursdays. I have plenty of empty seats in the classroom (room 250 at the Goldman School of Public Policy on Hearst Street on the north side »

Bidding for black votes, sometimes it’s not easy even for Democrats

Featured image I’ve mentioned before that it’s difficult, if not impossible, for Republicans to win the votes of African-Americans through policy proposals. These voters are loyal to the Democratic party. In any case, the Dems invariably will outbid the GOP through more blatant race conscious policies than the ones Republicans propose. Democrats too can find it difficult to bid for black votes — when they are running against each other. Take the »

Do governments have a duty to reduce racial gaps?

Featured image John has demonstrated how the Washington Post lied about a statement Katherine Kersten made regarding racial discipline quotas in the St. Paul school system. The lie appears in an article by Rebecca Tan called “Racial gaps prove hard to reduce.” On the internet, the article is called “Local governments are trying to fix racial inequity. But the path forward isn’t clear.” John’s attack on Tan’s dishonest reporting is spot on. »

Buttigieg’s pander: a Marshall Plan for black America

Featured image Pete Buttigieg soared from obscurity to third place (at one time) in the Democratic race for the presidency. His candidacy struck me as interesting for about a week. Then, I realized that he’s just another left-wing Democrat, distinguished from the rest of the field primarily because he happens to be gay. And he has fallen back in the polls. Even at its peak, the Buttigieg campaign faced a huge problem »

A question for Joe Biden

Featured image Joe Biden says he has nothing to atone for over his opposition to school busing in the 1970s. He adds that this is an issue with which 99 percent of Americans are unfamiliar. Biden is right on the first count. He need not apologize for opposing a regime that was unwise and unpopular. Good for him for refusing to do so. I would be more impressed if he didn’t couch »

The “adversity score” gambit

Featured image I want to add a few observations to those of Scott and Heather Mac Donald regarding the “adversity score” that the College Board offers to provide to colleges along with applicants’ SAT scores. First, college admissions offices already know the information that yields this score. Charles Deacon, the dean of undergraduate admissions at Georgetown acknowledged: We have so much personal data on all our applicants that we don’t feel the »

How Montgomery County, Maryland discriminates against Asians

Featured image I wrote here about how the federal government is probing the Montgomery County School system to determine whether it is discriminating against Asian-American students by limiting their admission into two highly sought-after magnet school programs. Between 2016 and 2017, the number of Asian-American students admitted into the two programs dropped by 23 percent. The next year, it dropped again, this time by 20 percent. One reason for the sharp decline »

Feds to probe discrimination against Asians in Montgomery County Schools

Featured image Like a great many school districts, Montgomery County, Maryland has magnet programs for its top students. Students from outside the normal neighborhood boundaries of a school can be admitted to the programs. Selection is supposed to be based on merit. Between 2016 and 2017, the number of Asian-American students admitted into two sought-after middle school magnet programs in Montgomery County dropped by 23 percent. The next year, it dropped again, »

Lessons and non-lessons from the college admissions scandal

Featured image The college admission fraud revelations are a scandal of some significance. The fraudulent behavior was reprehensible and fairly widespread. There are lessons to be learned. I agree with Heather Mac Donald that the two main ones are that “an elite college degree has taken on wildly inflated importance in American society, and the sports-industrial complex enjoys wildly inflated power within universities.” However, some of the lessons being extracted from the »

The college-admissions fraud

Featured image It seems like last year, but it was only last week that United States Attorney for Massachusetts Andrew Lelling announced the indictments and related arrests in the college admissions bribery scheme dubbed Operation Varsity Blues by the authorities. The Department of Justice has posted a press release with links to the charging documents filed so far here. It lists 50 defendants. Lelling held a big press conference with the FBI »

DNA testing and college admission

Featured image Inside Higher Ed reports that some parents are having their children take DNA tests to prove they are black (or some other preferred minority) in order to enhance their chances of being admitted to the college of their choice. There’s nothing surprising about this trend. Given the massive advantage they confer on blacks, colleges are hard pressed to take the word of applicants that they are in that category if »

What it’s like to apply to Ivy League schools in the era of affirmative discrimination

Featured image The video below follows three similarly situated high school students from the same New Jersey school who applied for early admission to Ivy League schools. One of the students is Asian. He applied to Penn. Another is Black. He applied to Princeton. The third is half Asian and half White. He also applied to Princeton, reluctantly “confessing” to the school that he’s part Asian. The video talks to the students »

Racial discrimination, Harvard style

Featured image At its 2018 National Lawyers Convention this past Friday, the Federalist Society sponsored one of its characteristically excellent panels featuring diverse points of view — this one on the 2014 lawsuit challenging Harvard’s sophisticated program of racial discrimination in undergraduate admissions. The lawsuit was brought by Students for Fair Admissions against Harvard alleging that Harvard was violating Title VI of the Civil Rights Act by, among other things, discriminating against »

Harvard: Stop Pretending!

Featured image As the lawsuit by Asian-American students against Harvard proceeds, our friend David Lebedoff–one of whose degrees is from Harvard, if I remember correctly–weighs in, with Harvard’s motto, Veritas, as his polar star: Karl Marx, who today’s undergraduates think was that curly-headed guy honking at Groucho, proclaimed in his own turbulent time that “History repeats itself, first as tragedy, second as farce.” Well, he had to get something right. But who »