Racial Preferences

Liberalism’s Zero-Sum Racial Spoils System

Featured image Liberals have long believed that economics is a zero-sum process (think back to Lester Thurow’s old book, The Zero-Sum Society): people only get rich by taking from the poor. You see this in liberals’ long-used rhetoric about how income tax cuts, which allow people to keep more of what they earn, are described as “redistributing” wealth. The idea of positive wealth creation seems beyond the grasp of most liberals. Now »

Is Race Discrimination Legal, Or Not? [with comment by Paul]

Featured image We live in a world in which race discrimination is ubiquitous. Universities, government agencies and all major employers systematically discriminate in favor of some races, and against others, under the banner of “affirmative action.” This has been going on for 50 years. And yet, the 14th Amendment’s guarantee of equal protection has been applied to ban race discrimination by public entities in a number of contexts. Similarly, the Civil Rights »

The Dumbing Down of America: Lawyer Edition

Featured image From the TaxProf comes the news that a number of states are lowering, or considering lowering, the scores needed to pass the bar exam. Why? So that more minorities will become lawyers: Several states say they could make their bar exams easier to pass as a way to address racial diversity problems and access-to-justice issues entrenched in the legal profession. Their statements coincide with the first data from California, which »

A correction on Princeton’s admissions figures

Featured image Last night, I wrote that slightly less than 9 percent of those admitted to Princeton’s class of 2025 are white male Americans. However, a closer reading of Princeton’s announcement indicates that the actual percentage is slightly less than 14 percent. I based the 9 percent figure on the residual, after eliminating the 14 percent of admittees who are international students and the 68 percent who are “persons of color” from »

Race-based preferences in Ivy admissions aren’t about diversity

Featured image Last night, I reported that white Americans make up only 18 percent of those offered admission to Princeton’s class of 2025, and that males make up less than 9 percent of that group. As I noted here, however, the actual numbers appear to be 28 percent and 14 percent, respectively — still shockingly low and suggestive of race discrimination, in my opinion. I haven’t seen the numbers for other Ivy »

Princeton limits white male domestic admissions to 14 percent of next class*

Featured image Princeton has offered admission to its class of 2025 to 1,498 applicants. According to numbers provided by the University, around fourteen percent of them are white American males. 14 percent of the admitted applicants identify as international students. 68 percent of the admitted applicants from the U.S. identify as “persons of color.” 52 percent are female. 48 percent are male. Putting these numbers together, we see that only around 28 »

Is United’s set-aside program for minority and female pilots legal?

Featured image Last night I wrote about United Airlines’ plan during this decade to train 5,000 pilots for jobs with United, and to have half of the 5,000 be women and “people of color.” I suggested that, unless United can show that this regime is necessary to make up for past discrimination based on race and gender, the company’s plan might lead to unlawful results. Today, a friend pointed out that in »

United Airlines plans to use race and gender-based quotas to select pilots

Featured image United Airlines has announced a new policy regarding the hiring of pilots. The company states: Over the next decade, United will train 5,000 pilots who will be guaranteed a job with United, after they complete the requirements of the Aviate program – and our plan is for half of them to be women and people of color. What if that “plan” is inconsistent with selecting the best qualified candidates for »

Georgetown law prof “cancelled” for saying what can’t be said

Featured image Georgetown Law School has fired a professor for noticing and commenting on the fact that Blacks make up a disproportionate number of low-performing students in her class. Another professor has been placed on administrative leave. Adjunct professor Sandra Sellers was caught on video telling adjunct prof David Batson: I hate to say this. I end up having this angst every semester that a lot of my lower ones are Blacks. »

Coke demands that its law firms engage in unlawful discrimination

Featured image In January 2021, the general counsel of Coca Cola sent a letter to the law firms that represent it. The letter demanded, among other things, that these firms “commit that at least 30% of each of billed associate and partner time will be from diverse attorneys, and of such amounts at least half will be from Black attorneys.” To enforce this demand, Coke’s general counsel warned that failure to comply »

Google under attack for insufficient recruiting at HBCUs

Featured image Google is under fire for the way it recruits engineers from colleges. According to the Washington Post: For years, Google’s recruiting department used a college ranking system to set budgets and priorities for hiring new engineers. Some schools such as Stanford University and MIT were predictably in the “elite” category, while state schools or institutions that churn out thousands of engineering grads annually, such as Georgia Tech, were assigned to »

Short takes

Featured image *Former CIA Director John Brennan (how the hell did this hack get that job?) says “I’m increasingly embarrassed to be a white male these days.” That makes two of us. I’m embarrassed that John Brennan is a white male. Also that he’s an American. *Speaking of embarrassing, the petition for certiorari (i.e., for Supreme Court review) filed by the Asian-American plaintiffs in their case against Harvard provides a breakdown of »

Students for Fair Admissions files cert petition in Harvard case

Featured image Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA), the plaintiff in a lawsuit alleging that Harvard discriminates against Asian-American applicants, has filed a petition for certiorari to U.S. Supreme Court in its case against the school. A liberal district court judge ruled in favor of Harvard and a liberal court of appeals panel affirmed that ruling. Perhaps the non-liberal Supreme Court will take the case and rule against Harvard, whose discrimination against Asian-Americans »

The war on standards, Yale Law Journal edition

Featured image The Yale Law Journal has been accused of racial bias by some Black students. And it does appear that the Journal is biased — in favor of Blacks. According to the Washington Free Beacon: The conflagration began on Tuesday after a Journal editor, Gavin Jackson, resigned, saying he felt “used and tokenized” in his position. Jackson’s resignation elicited furious statements from a raft of affinity groups at the law school, »

Biden DOJ dismisses discrimination suit against Yale

Featured image As expected, the Justice Department, now under the control of Joe Biden, has voluntarily dismissed its lawsuit against Yale for discriminating against Whites and Asian Americans on the basis of their race. I wrote about that suit here and here. The Justice Department’s complaint demonstrates the magnitude of Yale’s race-based disfavoring of Whites and Asians. According to the complaint, which is based on the DOJ’s lengthy investigation of Yale’s undergraduate »

Deep meaning of equity

Featured image The execrable Susan Rice has returned to public life to lead the White House Domestic Policy Council. It’s an anodyne title, but she has taken up residence in the Executive Office of the President to execute, to crack the whip, to impose discipline, to play the role of Krupskaya to Joe Biden’s glassy-eyed Weekend at Bernie’s routine. Rice emerged on Tuesday to preview the strong dose of “equity” that Biden »

New York Times tries to justify racial discrimination in Oregon

Featured image Suppose that two similar small businesses in the same state seek funds from that state to relieve the economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic. Suppose that one of the businesses is owned by a Black and the other by a non-Black. Which business should get state funds? To any fair-minded individual, the answers are either (1) both should get relief, (2) neither should get relief, or (3) if relief goes »