Robert Mueller

Impressions from Mueller’s testimony

Featured image I’ve only watched portions of Robert Mueller’s testimony, hoping to get a sense of the proceedings. I don’t intend to waste my day, or even a significant portion of it, on this event. Here are my impressions of what I have watched: First, Mueller is an unimpressive witness. I think he is past his prime. Mueller frequently asks that questions be repeated. That’s understandable. Representatives from both sides are packing »

Mueller and the Oligarch

Featured image As Robert Mueller prepares to testify in Washington, John Solomon has an explosive story in The Hill: “How Mueller deputy Andrew Weissmann’s offer to an oligarch could boomerang on DOJ.” Solomon reports that just two weeks after Mueller’s appointment as Special Counsel, his deputy Andrew Weissmann reached out to lawyers for Ukrainian oligarch Dmitry Firtash with a proposal to secure dismissal of criminal charges against Firtash in exchange for dirt »

Eric Felten: Mueller’s footnotes

Featured image Eric Felten is a man of many parts. Among other things, he is a meticulous and literate reporter as well as one of my favorite analysts of the mysteries of Russiagate. Earlier this month we posted Eric’s July 1 RealClearInvestigations column “Insinuendo: Why the Mueller Report doth repeat so much.” Today Eric wades further into the Mueller miasma in the RCI column “The shaky foundations of Mueller’s footnotes.” RCI authorizes »

Eric Felten: Insinuendo in the Mueller Report

Featured image Eric Felten is a man of many parts. Among other things, he is a meticulous and literate reporter as well as one of my favorite analysts of the mysteries of Russiagate. In his July 1 RealClearInvestigations column “Insinuendo: Why the Mueller Report Doth Repeat So Much,” Eric waded into the Mueller miasma. RCI authorizes the republication of its articles with attribution. Our friends at Spectator USA posted it here yesterday »

The Mueller report revisited

Featured image The investigative affiliate of RealClearPolitics has posted Aaron Maté’s long examination of key findings in the Mueller report: “CrowdStrikeOut: Mueller’s Own Report Undercuts Its Core Russia-Meddling Claims.” Among other things, according to Maté, largely undisputed headline assertions that the Kremlin worked to secure Donald Trump’s victory are unsupported by evidence or other publicly available sources for that matter. As set forth in the summary provided by RCP, Maté finds that: »

The Powell factor in the Flynn case

Featured image Former Assistant United States Attorney Sidney Powell now represents Michael Flynn in the criminal case that still awaits his sentencing. This past Monday Powell and Flynn appeared together in court for a status hearing before Judge Emmet Sullivan. A partially redacted transcript of the hearing is posted here on Scribd. Margot Cleveland commented on the hearing last week in the Federalist column “Michael Flynn Attorney Suggests Special Counsel Withheld Key »

What was Mueller up to? His victims speak

Featured image Earlier this month RealClearPolitics posted Paul Sperry’s intensely reported account of the Mueller investigation from the perspective of its objects in “‘Scorched Earth’: Mueller’s Targets Speak Out.” Sperry prefaced his report: Now that [Special Counsel Robert] Mueller has ended his probe finding no election collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, 10 witnesses and targets of his sprawling, $35 million investigation agreed to speak with RealClearInvestigations because they no longer »

What Was Mueller Up To?

Featured image Robert Mueller turned in a disgraceful performance as Special Counsel, allowing himself and his staff to be used as a tool of the Democratic Party. He knew from an early stage that the core of what he was supposed to be investigating–“collusion”–did not exist. But he plowed forward, hoping to ensnare members of the Trump campaign or administration in process crimes. Meanwhile, he ignored the real scandal: the attempt by »

Dowd dings Mueller

Featured image Although he is left unnamed and identified only as the president’s personal counsel in the relevant pages of the Mueller Report, the report implicitly indicts and convicts John Dowd of obstruction of justice at page 300. It leaves open the question of whether Dowd did so with Trump’s knowledge or participation. I wrote about the report’s drive-by mugging of Dowd in “Mueller dings Dowd.” The report smears Dowd, we now »

DOJ: We would prefer not to

Featured image Judge Emmet Sullivan is presiding over the government’s case against Michael Flynn, who has yet to be sentenced by the court following his plea. Judge Sullivan recently ordered the government to release all transcripts of recordings of Flynn’s phone calls with Russian officials (such as Russia’s ambassador to the United States) and of any other recordings of him. For some reason or other, the government has failed to produce these »

Don Surber: Barr’s greatest hits

Featured image I cannot recommend Jan Crawford’s interview of Attorney General William Barr for CBS News highly enough. Here is the whole thing in podcast form. I plucked my favorite quote from the interview yesterday here. This morning I intended to comb through the CBS News transcript of Jan Crawford’s interview of Attorney General William Barr to highlights its greatest hits, but I find that Don Surber has done the work for »

Mueller dings Dowd

Featured image In its Volume II the Mueller Report treats a voicemail message from President Trump’s (unnamed) personal counsel to counsel for former Trump National Security Advisor Michael Flynn (also unnamed) as potentially obstructive of the investigation. The facts are set forth at pages 293-294 of the report. The message is quoted in part at page 294. The report’s analysis is set forth at pages 298-300. The report finds the message potentially »

Mueller Clarifies

Featured image Robert Mueller’s mini-press conference yesterday had what must have been the intended effect: it cast another cloud over President Trump, and gave rise to renewed talk about impeachment among Democrats. The takeaway, for most naive observers, likely was that the president may be “guilty” after all. This headline on the front page of my local newspaper, the Minneapolis Star Tribune, was typical: The casual observer likely won’t understand that President »

Robert Mueller, Partisan Fraud

Featured image Much has been written about Robert Mueller’s appearance before the press today, in which spoke briefly and nervously, repeating points that have already been made ad nauseam in his own report and elsewhere. Why did he do it? And why did he appear so nervous while he did it? Speculation has been rampant. Scott posted a transcript of Mueller’s remarks earlier today. Much could be said about them, but I »

Mueller’s miasma

Featured image Robert Mueller appeared before cameras at the Department of Justice this morning to make a departing statement today. In substance the statement doesn’t go beyond his report, but it is clear that he was determined to raise a cloud of dust behind him as he exited stage left and handed off to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Via Politico, here is the text of Mueller’s statement followed by the video posted »

Who were Team Mueller’s investigators?

Featured image Paul Sperry of Real Clear Investigations reports that special counsel Robert Mueller spent more than $732,000 on outside contractors, including private investigators and researchers, but his office refuses to say who they were. I’m not sure anyone cares who provided computer support for the Mueller investigation. However, it would be interesting to know who performed investigations for the team. This question seems particularly relevant because there is speculation — by »

Democrats Cry “Foul” on Mueller Report

Featured image I’m not sure which stage of grief they are in, but the Democrats are still mourning the loss of their Mueller Report dreams. They are trying to keep hope alive by, e.g., voting to hold Attorney General Barr in contempt for obeying the law. And they continue to fundraise off Mueller–who, after all, did the best he could for them. This morning the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee sent out an »