Trump Admninistration

House Dems want Stephen Miller to testify

Featured image House Democrats say they want White House immigration adviser Stephen Miller to testify about a plan to release illegal immigrants into sanctuary cities. The plan reportedly has been discussed, but only as one option. It has not been implemented. Getting Miller to testify before a congressional committee is a non-starter. Officials appointed by the president testify before Congress. Aides don’t. Thus, as the Washington Post acknowledges, two aides to former »

Allegation: Two cabinet members wanted to oust Trump via 25th amendment

Featured image James Baker is the former general counsel of the FBI. Last October, he was interviewed by members of the House about the FBI’s investigation into Russian interference in the election and related matters. Rep. Doug Collins has just released a transcript of the interview. Baker testified about the idea of Rod Rosenstein possibly wearing a wire to record President Trump, a matter that has received much attention. In addition, he »

Herman Cain for the Fed?

Featured image President Trump drew plenty of criticism when he nominated Stephen Moore to be a member of the Federal Reserve’s board of governors. Moore’s problem? He agrees with Trump about monetary policy. But why nominate someone to the Fed someone who doesn’t agree with the president about the issues the Fed deals with? To do so would be irresponsible, it seems to me. Now, however, Trump reportedly will nominate Herman Cain »

Polls: Trump’s approval rating among Hispanics approaches 50 percent

Featured image It’s an article of faith among white leftists that President Trump is a racist. He stands accused of being anti-Black and anti-Hispanic. But how do the alleged recipients of his animus view him? Poll numbers suggest that around half of Black voters consider Trump a racist. It remains to be seen whether those who don’t buy this narrative will enable Trump to make a dent in the pro-Democrat monolith that »

Jessie Liu withdraws [UPDATED]

Featured image I wrote here about Jessie Liu, the U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia and the Trump administration’s nominee for Associate Attorney General, the number three position at the Justice Department. Liu’s nomination concerned me because she was the Vice President of the National Association of Women Lawyers (NAWL) when that organization opposed and condemned the nomination of Samuel Alito to the Supreme Court. NAWL stated: [Alito] is not qualified »

Important norms were shattered, but not by Trump

Featured image Peter Baker, the talented New York Times journalist, frets that Robert Mueller’s investigation has erased a line drawn after Watergate. Baker writes: After Watergate, it was unthinkable that a president would fire an F.B.I. director who was investigating him or his associates. Or force out an attorney general for failing to protect him from an investigation. Or dangle pardons before potential witnesses against him. But the end of the inquiry »

House fails to override Trump veto on emergency order

Featured image The House failed today to overturn President Trump’s first veto, leaving his declaration of a national emergency at the southwestern border intact. Both chambers of Congress passed a resolution nullifying the president’s order, but Trump vetoed the resolution and the veto could not be rendered ineffective without two-thirds of both chambers voting to override it. Opponents of the emergency declaration missed by about 40 votes in the House. The final »

[Fill in the blank], Trump White House in chaos

Featured image The Washington Post greets the Mueller report with its standard, all-purpose story about chaos at the Trump White House. The title of its paper edition article about the White House response to the Mueller is “Trump team didn’t have a plan of attack.” But the White House didn’t need one. Mueller has not called for the indictment of President Trump or any member of his family. And given the news »

Trump set to issue order on campus free speech

Featured image As I write this, President Trump is poised to issue (or perhaps has just issued) an executive order directing federal agencies to tie research and education grants for colleges and universities to more aggressive enforcement of the First Amendment. Trump had announced his intention to issue such an order at the CPAC conference last month. According to the Wall Street Journal, the order instructs agencies, including the Departments of Education, »

Why is Trump losing so often in court?

Featured image Yesterday, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration’s position that the government has the power to arrest noncitizens who commit certain crimes and hold them in immigration jails before a deportation proceeding, without regard to how long ago they were released from prison. Two immigrants had argued that statutory language barred the government from arresting them after they were free for 24 hours, a deadline that often would be difficult »

Trump’s perfectly normal decision on Boeing’s 737 Max 8

Featured image Short of resigning, I’m not sure there’s anything President Trump could do that wouldn’t draw criticism, or at least raised-eyebrows, from the Washington Post. Even if he resigned, the Post would probably demand to know what took him so long. So it’s not surprising that the Post takes a shot at Trump’s common sense decision to ground the Boeing 737 Max 8. Calling Trump “Boeing’s decider-in-chief,” the Post notes that »

Washington Post overdoes the gloating

Featured image The Washington Post is pleased as punch that the Senate passed a resolution to overturn President Trump’s national emergency declaration. It gloats (via a headline in the paper edition) that, for Trump, “making it about himself didn’t click with GOP Senators.” According to the Post, Trump’s lobbying effort against the resolution treated the vote “almost exclusively in personal terms.” No surprise there. That’s how Trump treats most things. But the »

Senate rejects border emergency declaration, but not with veto-proof majority

Featured image A dozen Republicans joined Senate Democrats today to overturn President Trump’s declaration of a national emergency at the southwestern border. The vote was 59-41. Trump promptly declared he would veto Congress’ action. With only 59 Senate votes against him, the veto will stick. The 12 Republicans who voted to overturn Trump’s declaration are: Mitt Romney Susan Collins Lamar Alexander Roy Blunt Mike Lee Jerry Moran Lisa Murkowski Rand Paul Rob »

Alex Acosta’s losing bet

Featured image Earlier this week, I noted that Secretary of Labor Alex Acosta failed, in effect, to receive a “full confidence” declaration from the White House. Sarah Sanders’ statement in this regard followed a White House meeting in which, according to what I heard, Mick Mulvaney and at least one key domestic policy adviser urged President Trump to fire Acosta. Given Acosta’s scandalous behavior in connection with the sweetheart deal he gave »

Jessie Liu, an update

Featured image Jessie Liu is President Trump’s nominee for Associate Attorney General. This job is prestigious but usually not highly consequential. Liu likely has more impact in her current position as U.S. Attorney in Washington, D.C. Liu is well qualified to be Associate Attorney General. However, in this post I raised a concern over her role as Vice President of the National Association of Women Lawyers (NAWL) at a time that NAWL »

No White House “full confidence” declaration for Acosta

Featured image White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders declined today to say that President Trump has full confidence in Labor Secretary Alex Acosta. Instead, she told reporters that Acosta’s involvement in a 2007 plea deal with alleged serial sex offender Jeffrey Epstein is “currently under review.” I’ve been told that Acosta was the subject of a vigorous discussion involving Trump and some of his top advisers. At this meeting, according to »

Trump is right, we need an executive order on campus free speech

Featured image During his speech at the recent CPAC conference, President Trump thrilled the crowd, many of whose members were college students, by announcing that he plans to issue an executive order to protect freedom of speech on campus. My friend Stanley Kurtz has devoted years to fighting for campus free speech. Who better to evaluate Trump’s idea? Writing for NRO, Stanley concludes that “yes, there are many potential problems with federal »