Media

Lies are lies whether they “offend” or not

Featured image NBC’s Chuck Todd assures us that NBC’s Brian Williams is “mortified” by the recent revelation that, for 12 years, he falsely claimed to have been in an aircraft that was shot down during the Iraq War. Todd also says that what’s “stinging [Williams] the most” is that the last group of people he wants to offend are veterans. Todd confesses, however, that he hasn’t talked to Williams yet. This raises »

Rather insane

Featured image I have (at least) one more (forgive me!) note on Rathergate as I prepare for my talk next Thursday at Lyon College on “Rathergate Ten Years After.” Rereading Peter Wallsten’s September 20, 2012, Los Angeles Times article identifying Atlanta attorney Harry MacDougald as Buckhead, the guy who played a key role in the chain of events leading to the downfall of the story, we can observe the Democrats’ secondary response »

Kitzhaber cant

Featured image We are saturated in left-wing media. I think it is literally impossible to imagine a world in which the media were impartial, or fair, or tilted right rather than left. Professor Tim Groseclose nevertheless brings the methodology of quantitative social science to the task in Left Turn: How Liberal Media Bias Distorts the American Mind and the results are fascinating. To clarify her own thinking as she worked on the »

Rather full of it

Featured image I will have the honor of giving the annual Patterson Lecture at Lyon College in Batesville, Arkansas, next week on the evening of February 12. I’ll be speaking on “Rathergate Ten Years After.” The college has posted the announcement with the relevant information here. I look forward to reconnecting with Lyon College President Don Weatherman, who began his academic career at St. Catherine University (St. Kate’s) in St. Paul. In »

Resist this

Featured image Steve Coll is dean of the Columbia Journalism School and an accomplished reporter in his own right. He is a staff writer for the New Yorker and the author of Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan and bin Laden and the Soviet Invasion, From the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2011, among other books. He reports on issues of intelligence and national security and in the journalism »

Out of the Daily Ditch

Featured image In a note to his readers Andrew Sullivan has declared that he is packing it in. Having written for one iteration or another of The Daily Dish for 15 years, he says he’s had enough. (It appears that the current iteration of his site is just The Dish.) Sullivan didn’t put a date certain on the retirement of his site — he put it “in the near future” — but »

Sharpton vs. the Teleprompter, vol. 4

Featured image The Free Beacon’s David Rutz has kept his eye on Al Sharton’s travails with the Teleprompter on his MSNBC show PoliticsNation. Having compiled volume 4 of his video series on Sharpton, Rutz notes: “In this latest installment, Sharpton wrecks the names of such people as Ebola patient Nina Pham, quarterback Troy Aikman and actor Ray Romano, of animals like koalas (kola-cue?), and of general terms like waterboarding (waterboating), manhunts (manhoods), »

Risen at large

Featured image Former CIA officer Jeffrey Sterling was convicted on nine counts alleging violation of the Espionage Act; Sterling blew a highly classified Clinton-era operation intended to disrupt Iran’s nuclear program. He did so to no discernible public good; the crimes of which he now stands convicted are truly heinous. Here is how reporter Matt Apuzzo describes Sterling’s conviction in the lead paragraph of his page-one New York Times story: “Jeffrey A. »

Jeffrey Sterling convicted; his accomplice remains free

Featured image Jeffrey Sterling, a former Central Intelligence Agency officer, was convicted of espionage today. He was charged with telling a journalist about a secret operation to disrupt Iran’s nuclear program. The journalist was James Risen of the New York Times. Scott has written extensively about this case, focusing on Risen’s disclosure of Sterling’s secrets and the government’s unwillingness to require the journalist to testify in the case. Fortunately, Sterling was convicted »

Lessons of the Risen case

Featured image We have written several times here about the case of James Risen. Called to testify in the government’s prosecution of former CIA officer Jeffrey Sterling for violation of the Espionage Act, Risen declined to testify; Sterling had laundered his exposure of a Clinton-era operation intended to undermine Iran’s nuclear program (I rashly infer from the circumstances, under a promise of confidentiality) through Risen in one of his recent books. The »

The Attkisson file

Featured image There is a lot of meat for conservatives to chew on in former CBS News reporter Sharyl Attkisson’s memoir cum exposé Stonewalled: My Fight For Truth Against the Forces of Obstruction, Intimidation and Harassment in Obama’s Washington. It is easily one of the most important political books published last year. One can infer from the subtitle of the book much of what Attkisson has on offer. One might not have »

A backgrounder for Matt Apuzzo

Featured image New York Times reporter Matt Apuzzo joined the Times in 2012. He’s a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter, but his article on the testimony of Condoleezza Rice at the trial of Jeffrey Sterling last week suggests he doesn’t know much about the Times. During her tenure as Secretary of State, Rice met with Times editors to persuade them not to publish James Risen’s draft article disclosing the highly classified, Clinton-era CIA »

Media Alert: Bill Bennett Show Wednesday

Featured image I’ll be guest-hosting Bill Bennett’s “Morning in America” radio show on Wednesday morning from 6 – 9 am eastern time.  Check the website for your local station, or listen online.  I’ll be breaking down President Obama’s State of the Union address from the night before, with maybe a detour about the leftist hysteria over the box office success of American Sniper, and a word or two about the “hottest year” hysteria »

At the Sterling trial

Featured image Last week the government commenced its prosecution of former CIA official Jeffrey Sterling for violation of the Espionage Act. The government alleges that Sterling leaked the details of a program intended to undermine Iran’s nuclear program to New York Times reporter James Risen. The program was subject to a security classification indicating its extreme sensitivity. Sterling did not publicly disclose the details of the CIA program; he laundered them through »

Rathergate ten years after

Featured image On Lincoln’s birthday — that’s February 12, for the young people out there — I will have the honor of giving the annual Patterson Lecture at Lyon College in Batesville, Arkansas. As I understand it, the Patterson Lecture is given by journalists and it is devoted to some aspect of journalism. I will be addressing “Rathergate ten years after.” I don’t think I’ll be speaking for more than 45 minutes »

Stockholm syndrome at the Washington Post

Featured image Stockholm syndrome occurs when hostages express empathy, sympathy, and/or positive feelings about their captors, even to the point of identifying with and/or defending them. The Washington Post, whose reporter Jason Rezaian has been imprisoned in Tehran for more than five months, appears to be experiencing something resembling Stockholm syndrome. Consider this article by Carol Morello. She reports that Iran’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, has expressed concern about what he »

Je Suis Hypocrit

Featured image Everyone feels great about proclaiming the slogan “Je suis Charlie,” but as David Brooks points out (okay, okay, get your catcalls and boos out of the way here), if Charlie Hebdo were published on just about any American college campus, the PC police would shut it down as “hate speech.” Jonathan Rauch, who as mentioned here before is an advocate of gay marriage, has some useful observations about the campus »