Podcast: Ilya Shaprio on the Supreme Court

Featured image With the new Supreme Court term under way, and with several potential landmark oral arguments already in the can, I decided to catch up with Ilya Shapiro, director of constitutional studies at the Manhattan Institute, and author of Supreme Disorder: Judicial Nominations and the Politics of America’s Highest Court. It turns out that the kind of confirmation battles that have become famous ever since Robert Bork in 1987 are not »

Loose Ends (197)

Featured imageLately I’ve been saying “Things are going to get worse before they get worse,” and while I still think that is true, today the stars have aligned to bring us a bunch of cheering news. • Starting with a strike today by 1,000 New York Times employees, which can only improve the product. One of the striking employees is Nicole Hannah-Jones, impresario of the egregious 1619 Project, but how can »

Dear President Biden

Featured imageI understand you are deliberating with your family over a run for reelection as president. Speaking from outside the family, I want to share a few thoughts with you. The day you were sworn in you were older than Ronald Reagan the day he left office after two terms. Hey, the job is keeping you “young.” You are an inspiration to nursing home residents across the United States. You make »

The FBI factor

Featured imageI wish National Review would let Andrew McCarthy’s columns out from behind its paywall, but it is not to be. I have paid the big bucks to read Andy’s columns and found the fee worth it, but it rubs against the grain of the Internet. Surely some one or two of NR’s benefactors could spring for whatever it would take to free up Andy’s columns, at least on occasion. I »

Introducing “Uncancelled History”

Featured imageDouglas Murray has a new venture entitled “Uncancelled History” that some readers may be interested in following. Its opening act is a ten-episode series of interviews with leading contrarian thinkers who take on the woke ideology of historical distortions that everyone knows today. I hope this is the first of several “seasons” of this great concept. The third episode in the series features Power Line favorite Jean Yarbrough of Bowdoin »

The Mystery of Woke Capitalism

Featured imageWhy has pretty much all of big business gone left-wing? There are several theories, none of which seem to me to fully explain the phenomenon. But whatever the causes, the effect is an inescapable part of our daily landscape. Here are a few instances for today. Disney has a new/old CEO in Bob Iger, and many speculated that he would pull back on that company’s extreme leftism. But not for »

Thought for the Day: John Marini on Trump

Featured imageAmidst the latest Trumpstorm (“Trumpenkampf“?), let’s revisit one of John Marini’s sage observations from way back in 2016 that is especially useful to keep in mind just now: It is possible that the Trump phenomenon cannot be understood merely by trying to make sense of Trump himself. Rather, it is the seriousness of the need for Trump that must be understood in order to make sense of his candidacy. Those most »

The Grassley-Johnson experience

Featured imageSenators Chuck Grassley and Ron Johnson have made it a mission to expose the Biden family corruption at whose apex sits President Biden. Their various reports, speeches, and correspondence are all accessible here. Most recently, they summarized the fruits of their research in this letter letter dated October 26, 2022 (“[t]he letter summarizes key elements of the Biden family’s engagements with individuals linked to the Chinese communist party and Chinese »

The Times and WaPo Take Up Arms

Featured imageWell, no, of course they don’t. The idea that liberal news outlets might contribute to our national defense, rather than undermining it, is laughable. And yet, here they are: the defense authorization bill is being held hostage to the Democrats’ insistence that the “Journalism Competition and Preservation Act” be included in it. Whatever the merits of the JCPA, it has absolutely nothing to do with national defense, and should be »

Saving the World With Electric Vehicles

Featured imageJust kidding. Willis Eschenbach quantifies the amount of fossil fuel usage that electric vehicles actually save in the U.S.: The Department of Energy’s Argonne National Lab has just released a study showing that in 2021, US privately-owned plugin hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) “saved about 690 million gallons of gasoline.” But that is a huge exaggeration because fossil fuels provide 61% of the electricity in the US »

The Daily Chart: Take Your Lithium

Featured imageJohn pointed out here yesterday the fantasy of battery storage, but here is another look at the problem. The belief that we’re going to make intermittent wind and solar power “work” by having massive amounts of battery storage depends on fantastic assumptions of future battery production. The amount of lithium—the current main ingredient of our best technology at the moment—necessary for these projections is depicted vividly here: »

Time for an Artificial Intelligence Press Secretary?

Featured imageThere’s been a lot of news in the last few weeks about how artificial intelligence bots are on the cusp of being able to write prose, poetry, and music as well as or better than humans. Color me skeptical—art is not chess—but there’s one instance I can think of where even a primitive AI system would be better than the current human being attempting the job: President Biden’s press secretary »

The Daily Chart: Wood You Believe. . .

Featured imageYou likely have seen the meme showing a lit candle with the question, “What did environmentalists use for light before candles?” Answer: “Electricity.” This quip comes back to mind with the first chart here showing that for all the talk of the growing share of “renewable” energy (meaning chiefly wind and solar), the overwhelming majority of “renewable” energy is actually hydropower (which environmentalists oppose in the U.S.—in fact many state »

After last night

Featured imageThis is a postscript to my November 9 installment of “After last night” on this year’s midterms. • In a perfect coda to the disappointing outcome of the 2022 midterm elections, Raphael Warnock won reelection to the Senate from Georgia last night. He did it by taking 51.4 percent of the vote in his runoff against Herschel Walker for a full six-year term. Walker fell about 100,000 votes short out »

James Baker to the nth degree

Featured imageJames Baker is a key player in old Twitter’s suppression of the New York Post’s Hunter Biden laptop reporting before the 2020 election. Jonathan Turley noted his ubiquity as a player in the scandals of the past six years in “Six degrees of James Baker.” After including him in my “Notes on the Twitter Files” this morning, I now have to add this mind-boggling postscript. It never occurred to me »

Thought for the Day: John McWhorter on Woke Religion

Featured imageOne podcast I try not to miss is The Glenn Show, hosted by Brown University economist Glenn Loury, and I make a point of never missing his regular every other week guest, the Columbia linguist John McWhorter. I am slow in getting to McWhorter’s most recent book, Woke Racism: How a New Religion Has Betrayed Black America. Here’s his case that “wokery” is literally the new religion of the left: »

White House Sticks to Its Story on Twitter

Featured imageIn light of everything that has come out, does the White House think Twitter did the right thing by censoring news about Joe Biden’s corruption prior to the 2020 election? A reporter posed that question to White House spokeswoman Karine Jean-Pierre. Her response? Basically, the administration hates Twitter under the Musk regime and has nothing to say about the suppression of news that would have been damaging to Biden: If »