2020 Presidential Election

Will We Ever Be Rid of Hillary?

Featured image Don’t say I haven’t been warning you that Hillary Clinton’s desire for the White House is akin to Gollum’s obsession with the One Ring of power.  If you need some weekend amusement, check out Salon‘s case for Hillary in 2020: 1. Hillary Clinton is the Winston Churchill to Vladimir Putin’s Adolf Hitler. I agree with the basic principle of Godwin’s Law: The first person to invoke Hitler in a political »

It’s Official: Democrats Now the Socialist Party of America

Featured image With new survey evidence showing that the base Democratic Party voter has been steadily shifting to the left for the last 15 years, Dana Milbank of the Washington Post yesterday made it official: When Bernie Sanders launched his bid for the Democratic nomination, he was often asked whether he, a democratic socialist, would actually become a Democrat. Now, more than a year after he ignited a movement with his unsuccessful »

The Dems 2020 Field Taking Shape

Featured image And what a shape it is. The Washington Post helpfully handicaps the top 15 Democratic presidential prospects for 2020, but from surveying the list one wonders whether the Post confused the office of President of the United States with president of the AARP. There are a few younger candidates from the margins of the long shots, like Mark Zuckerberg (39 in 2020), or Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti (49 in 2020), »

Our dystopian future

Featured image I can’t think of anything smart (in a straightforward sense) President Obama ever said, but he had a certain gift for promulgating bad policies that are difficult to undo. Obamacare is first and foremost among them, but Obama’s catastrophic foreign policy also presents a powerful case in point. That bit about undermining American allies while building up America’s enemies — that wasn’t just bad, it was evil. But the arrangement »

A middle class revival

Featured image This column by Robert Samuelson is called “The Quiet Comeback of the Middle Class.” It presents a picture of contemporary America at variance from the narrative of both the left and the Trumpians, at least in their 2016 incarnation. Samuelson cites a Gallup poll from June of this year in which 62 percent of Americans said they are in the middle or upper middle class, while only 36 percent classified »

About Trump’s “re-election” ad

Featured image John wrote about and posted what he calls Trump’s first re-election ad. The ad touts the record level stock market and the unusually low unemployment numbers. It doesn’t cite any legislative victories or foreign policy accomplishments. Nor could it. As a re-election pitch, current stock market prices and employment numbers couldn’t be less relevant. The relevant numbers will be the ones in 2020, when Trump faces the voters. At that »

President Trump’s First Re-Election Ad [Updated: CNN Refuses to Run It]

Featured image We truly have entered the era of the permanent campaign. The 2020 election is more than three years away, and President Trump has already released his first ad. I suppose the ad has in view not only Trump’s re-election, but also the fact that the Democratic Party press doesn’t want to cover the administration’s accomplishments, preferring to obsess over Trump’s foibles and non-existent scandals. The ad seeks to remind voters »

The Booker Freakout

Featured image I talk frequently with students about the nature of political ambition, starting with the ambiguity of ambition itself. Ambition is necessary, in public as in private life, but sometimes ambition can be ugly to see and distorting to the soul. Just think of how people sometimes use the term “ambition” negatively or sarcastically: “My goodness, he is certainly ambitious!” This is preface for taking in the sad decline of New Jersey »