Russia investigation

From “collusion” to “obstruction”

Featured image With the release of the Mueller Report last week, the mainstream media have mostly moved on from “collusion” to “obstruction” without a look backward. While they formerly chimed in on “collusion” with the unanimity and volume of an audience of Communist Party functionaries applauding one of Stalin’s speeches, they have now transferred to the same hatefest with a new theme. It is remarkable. Indeed, I wonder if the state press »

Papadopoulos: Oh, yeah, there was spying

Featured image George Papadopoulos is the author of Deep State Target, just published last month. He must reside somewhere close to the origin of the spying on the Trump campaign conducted by the FBI — as a subject, not as a perpetrator. Byron York tracked him down last week for a podcast laying out his story “in crazy detail,” as the summary rightly has it. Long story short: In this interview, George »

NYT: Not crazy, just two years late

Featured image We’ve been saying for the past two years or so that the Steele Dossier, on which so much of the Russia hoax was predicated, is Russian disinformation — if it is what it purports to be. You only have to read it and exercise your common sense to figure this out. This was an exercise, however, that would have belied the hysteria foisted on us by the Democratic Party and »

The Mueller Report and the Starr Report: Compare and contrast

Featured image In his long-awaited report, special counsel Robert Mueller found that the evidence failed to establish “collusion” between the Trump campaign and Russia. In addition, he did not find that President Trump committed obstruction of justice, the only other offense discussed in the report. By contrast, independent counsel Kenneth Starr, in his 1998 report, established that President Clinton perjured himself during a civil deposition, conspired to obstruct justice, violated criminal prohibitions »

William Barr speaks

Featured image I was tied up all day yesterday attending the trial of Mohamed Noor. This morning I tracked down the FOX News video of Attorney General Barr’s press conference on the release of the Mueller report (full video below). Perhaps not surprisingly, it doesn’t quite conform to what I heard about it in the news on the radio coming home. I thought that readers who were also otherwise engaged yesterday might »

William Barr vindicated

Featured image After Attorney General Barr issued his summary of the Mueller report, rabid anti-Trumpers accused him of misstating what Mueller said. It was an odd accusation inasmuch as the critics hadn’t seen the Mueller report. Perhaps some of the anti-Trumpers on Mueller’s team told their friends that Barr didn’t accurately report the special counsel’s conclusion. The allegation was always highly implausible. No one even half as intelligent as Barr would lie »

Did Mueller predetermine not to say Trump committed a crime?

Featured image Earlier today, in commenting on the Mueller report, I wrote: Mueller says that “if we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state.” By the same token, if Mueller had confidence that Trump clearly did commit obstruction of justice, he would also so state. It seems obvious that he lacked that confidence. This seems self-evident. »

Mueller on obstruction of justice: It’s complicated. [UPDATED]

Featured image Robert Mueller copped out when he declined to determine whether President Trump obstructed justice. He left it to the Attorney General to make that call, even though the rationale for having a special counsel was that Trump administration officials couldn’t be trusted to decide whether their boss committed crimes. The issuance of Mueller’s report does nothing to mitigate the cop-out. According to the report, the issue of obstruction of justice »

The Mueller Report: Early Returns

Featured image The Mueller Report has been delivered. Attorney General William Barr gave a press conference this morning, summarizing its contents. Democrats gnashed their teeth over the fact that Barr was able to “spin” the report some hours before everyone saw it. Now that they have read the report–at least in part–they are trying to keep “obstruction of justice” alive, as Mueller described ten actions by President Trump that could be construed »

We’ve Gone Through the Looking Glass

Featured image It is almost unbelievable that the Democrats and their media adjunct are trying to deny that the Obama administration spied on the Trump presidential campaign. Are they unaware of the multiple FISA warrants obtained to spy on Carter Page? Do they not know that the fake Fusion “dossier” was the basis for those FISA warrants, thus eliminating any question about whether the point was to spy on the Trump campaign? »

Barr brings accountability

Featured image Kim Strassel devotes her weekly Wall Street Journal column today — “Barr brings accountability” (behind the Journal’s column) — to the news that Attorney General William Barr is undertaking a review of the surveillance of the Trump presidential campaign conducted by the FBI and intelligence agencies under the Obama administration. As we have frequently observed, we weren’t meant to learn a blessed thing about this surveillance. Strassel picks up this »

“Spying did occur”

Featured image Democrats cannot handle the truth. We saw this yesterday in their uniform reaction to Attorney General Barr’s acknowledgment that “Spying did occur” on the Trump presidential campaign. The link is to today’s Wall Street Journal editorial (by Kim Strassel, I am quite sure, and behind the Journal’s paywall. Somewhere near the top of this post, however, I want to quote a sentence from Mollie Hemingway’s Federalist column on the Barr »

Barr: I need to explore spying on the Trump campaign

Featured image Attorney General William Barr is testifying before the Senate Appropriations Committee today. A little while ago, he talked about the subject of spying on Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign. Barr stated: I am going to be reviewing both the genesis and the conduct of intelligence activities directed at the Trump campaign during 2016 and a lot has already been investigated. . .by the office of the Inspector General. But one of »

The Nunes referrals

Featured image Rep. Devin Nunes appeared on Maria Bartromo’s Sunday Morning Futures show yesterday. No one in Congress has taken more abuse than he has for his work exposing the Russia collusion hoax foisted on us by the 2016 Clinton presidential campaign. To borrow a formulation from Walt Whitman: He is the man. He suffered. He was there. We were not supposed to know. Thanks in large part to Rep. Nunes and »

The limits on what can be disclosed from Mueller’s report

Featured image Congressional Democrats keep demanding that the entire Mueller report be made available. They aren’t doing this in the interest of transparency and the public’s right to know. Democrats are still complaining that the investigation of Hillary Clinton’s email scandal yielded more than a statement of no prosecution. If Dems had gotten their way, we would know nothing more about what the Justice Department discovered or believed. The Democrats want full »

Ineffective Democrat subpoenas

Featured image A House panel voted yesterday to authorize subpoenas to obtain Robert Mueller’s full report on Russian interference in the 2016 election. The vote was strictly along party lines. Democrats aren’t going to issue the subpoena yet. First, they will negotiate with the Justice Department. But Democrats are holding a losing hand. This subpoena, like all the others House Democrats are thinking about issuing, cannot, in all likelihood, be effectively enforced. »

Mueller and Trump, Part 2

Featured image Scott wrote last week about Byron York’s revealing podcast with John Dowd, who represented President Trump during a substantial portion of Trump’s dealings with special counsel Robert Mueller. Byron has now posted, on Ricochet, the second installment of his interview with Dowd. He writes about it here. An excerpt: In our earlier talk, Dowd stressed that the Trump White House fully cooperated with Mueller’s investigation, and that on more than »