Higher education

Princeton’s “systemic racism” captures the government’s attention

Featured image Two weeks ago, Princeton University’s president, Christopher Eisgruber, issued a letter to the Princeton community in which he admitted that the institution he has run for seven years is plagued by “systemic racism.” This is quite an admission for a number of reasons. One of them, as I pointed out, is that it confesses to a violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act. Title VI provides that “No »

Was Jessica Krug a worse professor because she turned out to be White?

Featured image Have you seen the clip below in which Jessica Krug, the white professor who pretended to be Black, imitates what she takes to be a mode of black speech? Her riff begins at about the one minute mark. Watch the latest video at foxnews.com Krug’s rant reminded me of Robin Williams imitating black argot and speech patterns when I saw him in San Francisco as a warm up act for »

Harvard Hires PLO Executive to Mentor Students

Featured image The Clarion Project reports that Harvard University has selected Saeb Erekat — who serves as secretary general of the Executive Committee of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) — to be a fellow at the Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. Erekat’s duties will include mentoring students and giving seminars in the school’s “The Future of Diplomacy Project.” Erekat is rabidly anti-Israel, as one would expect from a »

Princeton’s president cops to running a systemically racist university

Featured image Christopher Eisgruber is the president of Princeton University. He has been since September 2013. Before that, he was Princeton’s provost for nine years. Eisgruber is a lawyer. He clerked on the U.S. Supreme Court for Justice Stevens. A constitutional law scholar, he taught at NYU law school and then headed up Princeton’s law and public affairs program. Thus, Eisgruber is charged with knowledge of the law and of American history. »

Resentment, Critical Race Theory, and the war on standards

Featured image In the mid-1960s, when colleges began admitting black students who didn’t meet the standards applied to white ones, some observers presciently warned that the students admitted based on race preferences would carry a stigma. To my knowledge, however, no one one was prescient enough to realize that, in response, Blacks would try to stigmatize Whites — including those granting them the benefit of preferential treatment and those suffering the burdens »

Asian-American “experts” back discrimination against Asian-Americans

Featured image Asian-Americans comprise the group most acutely victimized when colleges and universities dole out preferences in admission to African-Americans. The reason is obvious. Racial preferences minimize merit, as it has always been judged in this context — grades, test scores, and extra-curricular activities — and Asian-American students as a group are the most meritorious large racial/ethnic group of high school students. Thus, it’s not surprising when lawsuits challenging preferential admission policies »

Summer of our discontent

Featured image City Journal has just posted the lead essay from its Summer issue online. By Heather Mac Donald, the essay is “Conformity to a lie.” Subhead: “Academia’s monolithic belief in systemic racism will further erode American institutions and the principles of our civilization.” The essay opens: The lethal arrest of George Floyd in Minneapolis in late May triggered widespread riots and a torrent of contempt for America from virtually every institution »

DoJ to Yale: Stop discriminating

Featured image One gets the impression that in important respects the Trump administration is just beginning to fire on all cylinders. A brilliant and fully functioning Attorney General heading up the Department of Justice is at least one of those cylinders. Yesterday, for example, Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights Eric Dreiband notified Yale University of the department’s findings that Yale illegally discriminates against Asian American and white applicants in its undergraduate »

The College Death Spiral, Chapter 2

Featured image No sooner do I lay out the case for the financial catastrophe facing colleges and universities than the cavalry comes in with reinforcements, in the form of a typically trenchant column from Megan McArdle, and two pieces in The Economist. McArdle has some terrific reportage, starting with this: As students balked at full tuition for online education, Elizabeth Cohen, a political science professor at Syracuse University, set off a minor »

Has the College Death Spiral Started?

Featured image I’ve been tempted to tweak my liberal friends with the mischievous thought that COVID-19 is actually a Trump five-dimensional chess plot to destroy universities, unionized K-12 public education, and Hollywood (since TV and movie production is largely shut down too). Colleges and universities were already facing mounting financial pressure because enrollment is steadily declining and certain to get much worse in the coming decade (the result of falling birthrates back »

Cotton introduces Campus Free Speech Act, McConnell signs on

Featured image Our friend Sen. Tom Cotton has introduced the Campus Free Speech Restoration Act (CAFSRA). It provides that colleges and universities that promulgate restrictive speech codes, so-called free-speech zones, and other unconstitutional speech policies will lose their eligibility to receive federal student loans and grants through the Higher Education Act. Private universities will also lose eligibility unless they both fully disclose their policies on free expression and accept contractual responsibility for »

Professor Katz’s declaration

Featured image Do you recall the anti-George W. Bush petition that generated scads of mock signatories such as Hugh G. Reckshun? James Taranto delighted in chronicling the signatures daily in his online Best of the Web column for the Wall Street Journal. More recently, The Open Letter from Yale Law Students, Alumni, and Educators Regarding Brett Kavanaugh attracted one such signatory: “Charles U Farley, YLS ‘04.” Now, Charles Glasser observed, that’s a »

Marquette president hits and runs

Featured image After receiving a copy of the message/statement from Marquette University president Mike Lovell that John has parsed in the adjacent post, I wrote senior director of university communications Lynn Griffith at the address indicated in the message: Dear Ms. Griffith: I am one of four partners in and contributors to the site Power Line. We have received a copy of the statement sent out by President Lovell to the board »

Princeton faculty letter demands end to academic freedom

Featured image On July 4, a group of more than 400 Princeton faculty members and (from the look of it) hangers-on sent a letter to the university’s president and other leaders on the subject of “anti-black racism.” After a few perfunctory and unsupported allegations about this phenomenon, the authors proceed to the business at hand. They present several dozen “demands.” Each demand seems more outlandish than the last until, finally, we get »

Holloway’s way

Featured image Jonathan Holloway is the new president of Rutgers University. Insofar as one can tell from the quotes in Amanda Hoover’s NJ.com profile of Holloway — “Rutgers is named for a slave owner, but school’s first Black president says the name will stay” — his views resemble those of a conventional academic bureaucrat except in one respect. Holloway asserts that the university’s name isn’t up for changing even though it honors »

The problems with implicit bias training

Featured image Last week, Scott reported that Dartmouth will impose mandatory “implicit bias” training on all students, faculty, and staff. Even Dartmouth’s board of trustees “has committed itself to participating in the training.” I don’t doubt that there is such a thing as implicit bias. The bias can be against Blacks, Whites, Latinos, Jews, etc. It can also be against America, although these days much of the anti-American bias on display is »

Nightmare at Oberlin

Featured image Things haven’t gone well for Oberlin College in court recently. First, it was found liable for defaming Gibson’s Bakery. After the bakery’s owner tried to stop a black student from shoplifting, the Oberlin student senate condemned the bakery as racist and called for a boycott of its products, which Oberlin stopped purchasing for a time. A jury awarded the Gibson family $44 million in damages, reduced to $33 million by »