Higher education

That Duthu that they did

Featured image Dartmouth President Phil Hanlon recently named Bruce Duthu to the exalted position of Dean of Faculty from his position as associate dean and professor of Native American Studies. In his professional capacity Duthu had co-authored an extremely distasteful organizational statement supporting a boycott of Israel academic institutions. He is a supporter of the anti-Israel Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions movement that conflicts with Dartmouth policy. Professor Alan Gustman eloquently dissented from Duthu’s »

Peter Lawler, RIP

Featured image I’ve just caught up with the sad news this morning of the passing of Peter Lawler of Berry College at the too-soon age of 65. Peter was one of the most interesting and original conservative voices in academia, and he is irreplaceable. There was no one who understood—and practiced—liberal arts education rightly understood better than Peter. Among other things, Peter has to be counted as one of the best interpreters »

Heather Mac Donald’s dissent

Featured image A few essays have taken their place in the great tradition as masterpieces of intellectual demolition. Among such classics stands Samuel Johnson’s Review of Soame Jenyns’ A Free Enquiry Into the Nature and Origin of Evil. Jenyns’s “glib optimism” in the face of human suffering (as Walter Jackson Bate called it), and his complacency over the problem that suffering poses to religious belief, struck a nerve. If Johnson knew anything »

Meet Zach Wood

Featured image There is good news at Williams College. It does not come courtesy of the college administration, of course, but rather by way of junior Zach Wood. As the leader of the Uncomfortable Learning speakers’ program, Wood is the keeper of a good idea about opening up the school to diversity of the intellectual variety. Jennifer Kabanny told the story of Uncomfortable Learning in a 2014 article for the College Fix. »

Freakout at Howard University

Featured image Howard University, the “historically black” college in Washington, D.C., held its commencement this weekend. California Senator Kamala Harris, a Howard grad, delivered the address. Sen. Harris told the graduates: You are graduating into a very different time than it was when you arrived a few short years ago. We have a fight ahead. It’s a fight to determine what kind of country we will be. And it’s a fight to »

Middlebury Becomes Muddlebury

Featured image We noted here a week ago the tepid reaction of Claremont McKenna College to the violent disruption of Heather Mac Donald’s appearance there a few weeks ago, printing the entirety of Dean Peter Uvin’s lugubrious memo to the faculty that outlined how to let off the offending students. Now comes word out of Middlebury College about the punishment to be meted out to the students who violently assaulted Charles Murray »

The farce at St. Olaf

Featured image No sooner did we take a look at the alleged racial incidents at St. Olaf and the related rituals than the latest such incident — the one that gave rise to all the action — was revealed as another hate crime hoax committed by the black student in the middle of the matter. The college continues to investigate similar reported incidents that have occurred on campus since last fall. The »

The trouble at St. Olaf [Updated]

Featured image St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, has been convulsed by a series of alleged racial incidents that may or may not be what they appear to be. The Star Tribune reports that the college is scrutinizing “persons of interest” who may be responsible for a string of anonymous racist messages targeting black students. According to the college, some of the people “of interest” are affiliated with the college and others »

What Is Going On at Claremont McKenna?

Featured image Claremont McKenna College, scene of the disgraceful disruption of Heather Mac Donald last month, says it is going to discipline students involved in the incident. At least they say they are. Here is the complete memo circulated to the faculty by CMC vice president for academic affairs and dean of faculty Peter Uvin. I apologize about the length, but it is necessary to present the thing as an example of »

Dartmouth’s idea of “broadening the ranks”

Featured image Dartmouth College sends to alumni a publication called “Dartmouth Life.” The current issue introduces the teachers-scholars who joined the faculty this academic year. The article is called “New Faculty Broaden the Ranks.” The article allows each new faculty member briefly to summarize his or her area of academic interest. The hard science and math professors provided write-ups in line with traditional notions of what’s important in these fields. I discerned »

The suppression of Jewish voices at Tufts and Pitzer [UPDATED]

Featured image Anti-Israel groups on college campuses have come up with a new tactic in their effort to pass BDS (Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions) resolutions. They are manipulating the voting to exclude Jews from the process. At Tufts, a group called Students for Justice in Palestine decided to place an anti-Israel divestment resolution on the school senate’s agenda on the evening before the Jewish holiday of Passover, at a time when many Jewish »

Can the Liberal Arts Be Saved?

Featured image Harvey Mansfield likes to say that the job of modern conservatism is to save liberalism from liberals. The educational corollary is that conservatives are the only people who can save the liberal arts from liberalism, which has done its best to ruin them. The post-modern left now dominates the traditional liberal arts disciplines, and wonders why fewer and fewer students want to major in any of those fields any more. »

At women’s college, a student strike for more money and free therapy succeeds

Featured image Here’s a student protest that makes some sense to me. Resident advisers (RAs) at Scripps College went on strike seeking more dough (and I don’t mean play-doh). Sophie Mann, a junior at Scripps, writing in the Wall Street Journal, reports: In a new twist on student protests, a group of resident advisers at Scripps College went on “strike” last week after issuing a list of demands—mostly for more money. Other »

Jean Yarbrough explains

Featured image The great Jean Yarbrough teaches government at Bowdoin College. Professor Yarbrough is the author of the indispensable and award-winning book Theodore Roosevelt and the American Political Tradition. We have celebrated Professor Yarbrough several times on Power Line, including via Steve Hayward’s induction of her into our (incomplete) Power Line 100. Professor Yarbrough recently explained to a packed house at Bowdoin how she became a conservative and she gave them something »

Can Universities Be Fixed?

Featured image Turns out even The Simpsons has taken aim at the rot in higher education, with this scene from last week’s episode: Yes, I’m sure that eight new deans can indeed get to the bottom of the Halloween costume policy for Yale. When you’ve lost The Simpsons. . . But this video, from the Center for Freedom and Prosperity, suggests one method for spreading economic literacy that just might work: »

Out of their minds at Stanford

Featured image Elliot Kaufman is a Stanford junior who writes with great intelligence from inside the asylum. National Review has posted his several pieces for the site here, but he saved his best yet for the Wall Street Journal in “For a Stanford applicant, perseveration pays off” (behind the Journal’s subscription paywall). Following in the footsteps of the late John Updike, Kaufman makes good use of the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard. Kaufman »

Out of “their” “minds” at Brown

Featured image A Wall Street Journal reader forwarded James Freeman a copy of the letter received by the reader’s daughter from Brown University Director of Admissions Logan Powell. The reader, Freeman reports, is still trying to make sense of the letter. The reader’s bright daughter had already received news of her acceptance when a letter arrived that was addressed to her “Parent/Guardian.” Freeman reports: Oddly, the note referred to the accepted student »