Higher education

Is The Higher Ed Bubble Starting to Pop?

Featured image Talk of the “higher education bubble” has been around for a while, but two news items today make me think it is starting to pop—and remember, bubbles usually don’t pop instantaneously. The housing crash of 2008 was signaled by visibly deteriorating conditions in the summer of 2007. Likewise, the higher ed bubble is going to resemble the old line about how some rich person went bankrupt—first slowly, then all at »

How Do You Explain Trump at Berkeley?

Featured image This sounds a bit like the old joke, “How do you pet a porcupine?” Answer: “Very carefully.” More than a month ago I was asked during homecoming weekend to speak to an alumni panel on the topic of “Trump and the White Working Class,” along with the distinguished sociologist Arlie Hochschild, author of Strangers In Their Own Land, drawn from her experience of being embedded with rural folk in Louisiana, »

Jonah and Me, Unplugged

Featured image Late last week on a whirlwind visit to Washington DC I sat down with Jonah Goldberg to tape an episode of his new podcast, “The Remnant,” which title was inspired by Albert Jay Nock’s classic essay “Isaiah’s Job.” Nock was a wonderful stylist, and an early libertarian (William F. Buckley’s earliest informal tutor in many ways), and if you’ve never read his Memoirs of a Superfluous Man, add it to »

The age of outrage

Featured image Jonathan Haidt is the Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership at New York University’s Stern School of Business and author of The Righteous Mind, among other books. He is also cofounder of Heterodox Academy and is a voice of sanity in the asylum of higher education. Steve Hayward wrote about him for us here. On November 15 Professor Haidt gave the Manhattan Institute’s thirty-first annual Walter B. Wriston lecture (video »

DOJ investigates Harvard for race discrimination

Featured image The Department of Justice is investigating Harvard University’s use of race in undergraduate admissions. It has also warned Harvard that it is out of compliance with federal civil rights law because it has not provided documents the department requested. The investigation concerns admissions policies that depress the number of Asians admitted to Harvard. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color »

Thief of MAGA hat faces criminal charge

Featured image Back in September, we posted video of Edith Macias, a left-wing student at the University of California, Riverside, who stole the “Make America Great Again” hat of a fellow student. In an enlightening encounter, the hat thief and her victim exchanged views while college employees tried to adjudicate the dispute. Macias’ view was that the “f***ing hat” is promoting laws and legislation that are “literally killing people.” Also: “You feel »

Today in Campus Protest

Featured image So I’m making my way across Sproul Plaza on the Berkeley campus a couple days ago, past all the student tables that advocate for human rights for left-handed gay Klingons and whatnot, and I hear the familiar sound of a student yelling through a megaphone on the steps of Sproul Hall. What is it this time? Well, it turned out to be a spirited protest against. . . veganism! There »

Campus shout-down rate nearly quadruples

Featured image Stanley Kurtz reports that as we approach the halfway mark of the Fall 2017 semester, the rate of shout-downs on college campuses is nearly quadruple that of last spring. There have been nearly twice as many shout-downs as last semester in only half the time That’s a striking figure, given that shout-downs were far from rare during the Spring semester. Kurtz chronicled ten such events. They included rioting at Berkeley »

What is the ACLU prepared to do to defend free speech on campus?

Featured image Claire Gastañaga is the executive director of the ACLU of Virginia. Earlier this month, she tried to speak to students at William & Mary, her alma mater, about the First Amendment on college campuses. However, Gastañaga wasn’t able to. Left-wing students shouted her down. I wrote about this in a post called “What is William & Mary prepared to do to defend free speech on campus?” After Gastañaga was shouted »

And Now for Some Real “Fake News”

Featured image David Burge, the incomparable “Iowahawk,” put out one of those tweets a few months ago that cuts right to the heart of the matter. I don’t have the exact Tweet handy, but it ran something like, “Why is it that racist graffiti always seems to turn up in Brooklyn rather than Alabama?” He might have added college campuses, where the supposed sighting of a “poop swastika” in a bathroom has »

College administrator comes up short in analysis of shout-down crisis [With Comment by John]

Featured image Writing in the New York Times, Michael Schill, president of the University of Oregon, criticizes the “misguided” student protest movement that is assaulting free speech on college campuses. Schill knows of what he speaks. His attempt to give a “state of the university” speech was thwarted when protesters shouted him down. Schill ended up posting an outline of his speech on the internet. Schill says many of the right things »

Should Boalt Get the Boot?

Featured image Lawyers will know that U.C. Berkeley’s law school has long been known as Boalt Hall, named for John Boalt, a prominent 19th century California lawyer whose estate donated the money for Berkeley to start a law school way back in 1906. But there’s a problem: it seems Mr. Boalt harbored some racist views, in particular against the Chinese. You can read a paper Boalt delivered in 1877 entitled “The Chinese »

The campus shout-down movement takes its next logical step

Featured image Recently, a friend who is enrolled in a graduate program at a prestigious university asked me whether I would be interesting in speaking to a group of students as part of series on public policy the program was holding. She said that all of the speakers so far have been liberal and that I would add a different perspective to the proceedings. I responded, chidingly, that I might be risking »

Rush to Jean Yarbrough

Featured image The great Jean Yarbrough teaches government at Bowdoin College. Professor Yarbrough is the author of the indispensable and award-winning book Theodore Roosevelt and the American Political Tradition. We have celebrated Professor Yarbrough several times on Power Line, including via Steve Hayward’s induction of her into our (incomplete) Power Line 100. Most recently, we drew attention to her moving speech on the conservative turn in her thought. Yesterday Rush Limbaugh introduced »

Disrupt this

Featured image Tim Marshall is the provost of the university known as The New School. A friend forwards Marshall’s email on Curriculum Disruption Week with the assurance that “this is not a parody.” It’s not a parody, but it is almost funny! One might also say the descent to hell is easy. It turns out that we are in the middle of Curriculum Disruption Week. Provost Marshall announces: Leading up to the »

Widespread academic corruption lets UNC sports off the hook

Featured image Years ago, after it came to light that athletes at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill took bogus courses in African and Afro-American studies, I wrote; In my opinion, based on the facts I’ve seen so far, this story isn’t about football; it’s about academic corruption. Now, after years of investigating, the NCAA has reached basically the same conclusion. As a result, the University will not by sanctioned by »

Campus chaos — a shout-down a day

Featured image Stanley Kurtz reports on the escalating campus free speech crisis. He notes that last night’s disruption of Charles Murray’s speech at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor means that every working day for the past week has seen a significant shout-down. Here are the specifics: Thursday, October 5: Students at Columbia University stormed into a class on sexuality and gender law to protest its instructor, Suzanne Goldberg. Goldberg is both »