Higher education

Poll: College students overwhelmingly favor race-blind admissions

Featured image The youth of America may not be as clueless as the more pessimistic among us suppose. According to a new survey by College Pulse, 67 percent of college students strongly support “race blind” admissions. Another 18 percent “somewhat support” such admissions. This leaves only 15 percent who oppose race blind admissions. Of that group, only 5 percent strongly oppose them. The survey defines race blind admissions as meaning that “colleges »

Cornel West’s resignation

Featured image Cornel West, the Black left-wing public intellectual, has blasted Harvard and its Divinity School in a scathing letter of resignation. West had announced that he would resign earlier this year. There are good reasons to criticize Harvard’s Divinity School and to want no longer to be part of it. They are the same reasons not to have wanted to be associated with it in the first place. The school is »

The courage of the individual

Featured image Andrew Sullivan has posted a 90-minute podcast with Yale Law School’s Professor Amy Chua here on Substack. Professor Chua has of course become something of a celebrity in her own right. She has certainly become a controversial figure at Yale, as reflected in the New York Times feature story “Gripped by ‘Dinner Party-gate.’” She must be on to something. I found the whole podcast worth my time. Indeed, it left »

The case of Nikole Hannah-Jones

Featured image The case of Nikole Hannah-Jones stands at the crossroads of racial mania, journalistic degradation, historical fabrication, and educational descent. She appears to have walked out of an unwritten essay or novel by the late Tom Wolfe. Would that Wolfe were alive to do justice to her today. Spectator deputy editor Dominic Green puts me in mind of Wolfe in his column “The rights and wrongs of Nikole Hannah-Jones.” Here is »

Hannah-Jones to UNC. . .

Featured image No thanks Go to hell. Nikole Hannah-Jones, author of the New York Times’ discredited 1619 Project, has turned down the University of North Carolina’s controversial offer of tenure. She will take her talents BS to Howard University. Hannah-Jones comes out the winner if one assumes, as I do, that she doesn’t mind teaching (or whatever she will do) at a fourth rate institution. She won the tenure battle and then »

UNC grants tenure to Hannah-Jones

Featured image The University of North Carolina has decided to grant tenure to Nicole Hannah-Jones, author of the discredited 1619 Project, after all. It made the decision at a closed-door meeting of the Board of Trustees. The University initially denied tenure to Hannah-Jones, and with good reason. Her attempt at scholarship included demonstrably false claims, including the view that the American Revolution was waged to preserve slavery and that Blacks were largely »

The revolution comes to Juilliard

Featured image The Manhattan Institute’s invaluable Heather Mac Donald wrote “The revolution comes Juilliard” for MI’s City Journal last month. The story Heather tells is a tale of our time from the ever larger land beyond satire. Racial hysteria and opposition to Western civilization are among its themes. Heather’s column concludes: A leader in the arts world, told of Juilliard’s travails, observes: “This is a crucial time to stand up and call »

Down a black hole

Featured image The great Heather Mac Donald is not much given to humor in her documentation of the war on police or the derangement that pervades issues of race and gender on the left. However, her City Journal column “Down a black hole” takes us around a bend into a corner of the Twilight Zone that verges on the humorous: Physicists at MIT and SUNY Stony Brook recently announced findings that the »

Positively 4th Street, Univ. of MN style

Featured image George Floyd died in the custody of the Minneapolis police on May 25, 2020. Two days later University of Minnesota President Joan Gabel announced to great fanfare that she was restricting the university’s ties with the Minneapolis police. In an email message to the university community Gabel said she was telling her staff no longer to contract with Minneapolis police “for additional law enforcement support needed for large events, such »

How to get into an elite college if you’re Asian

Featured image Alice Chen specializes in helping excellent students get into top-ranked colleges and universities. Her bio is here. In this blogpost, Chen discusses what it takes to gain admission to an elite institution if you’re Asian or White: Grades: Basically perfect Test Scores: SAT: 1500+ SAT Subject Tests: 750+ APs: Many 5s Extracurriculars: Extraordinary – here are profiles of some of my students – they’ve been generalized to protect student identities »

My new hero

Featured image I have a new hero. He’s Walter E. Hussman Jr., an Arkansas newspaper publisher. Hussman, a major donor to the University of North Carolina, raised objections to UNC awarding tenure to Nikole Hannah-Jones. Hannah-Jones is the author of the 1619 project, a radical reinterpretation of American history that has been rejected by leading historians, including liberal ones and even socialists. Hussman says he didn’t threaten to stop donating to the »

Today’s College News: One Step Forward, Two Steps Back

Featured image First up, Washington and Lee University in Virginia has decided, after a long and stupid debate, not to change its name because, you know, Robert E. Lee, who as president of Washington College after the Civil War, rescued the institution from bankruptcy, whereupon the faculty had moved to have his name added to the institution. That was then, and this is now, to naturally the imperatives of the wokerati had »

How much longer will the Grutter racial preferences regime last?

Featured image The U.S. Supreme Court has before it a petition for certiorari in the race discrimination suit brought by Asian-American students against Harvard. I hope the Court agrees to hear the case. If the Court doesn’t, it will be a while before another opportunity arises to review the issue of race-based preferences in college admissions. By that time, the Court’s composition might not be as conservative as it is now. In »

How race preferences damage higher education

Featured image I want to second Steve’s praise for A Dubious Expediency: How Race Preferences Damage Higher Education, the fine new essay collection edited by Gail Heriot and Maimon Schwarzschild. The contributors include the two editors, Heather Mac Donald, Peter Kirsanow, and Peter Wood. Gail’s chapter on the impacts of race preferences on their intended direct beneficiaries is must reading, in my opinion. Wouldn’t it be great if the chapter were read »

Princeton drops Greek and Latin requirement for Classics majors

Featured image Using race-based preferences to admit students with qualifications vastly inferior to those admitted without the need for such preferences creates all sorts of problems and dislocations. One of them is the erosion of standards within various departments, especially ones that teach hard stuff. I wrote about one example — eliminating econometrics as a required course for graduating from a major school of public policy — here. Now comes word, via »

There must be a less embarrassing way to get into a top college

Featured image Stuffed animals seem to play an important part in the lives of a surprisingly large number of left-wing students. Apparently, they make these students feel safe. As safe as Play Doh does, maybe even safer. According to this report, a stuffed animal even helped a black teenager gain admission to Princeton: An inspiring essay about his childhood stuffed animal helped a New Jersey high school senior get into 20 colleges, »

Book of the Week: A Dubious Expediency

Featured image While we await word as to whether the Supreme Court will take up appeal of the case of Harvard’s blatant discrimination against Asians, we note the publication this week of A Dubious Expediency: How Race Preferences Damage Higher Education, a fine essay collection edited by Gail Heriot and Maimon Schwarzchild of the University of San Diego, and published by our friends at Encounter Books. The title of the book—”a dubious »