Monthly Archives: December 2008

Why Are We Safer?

In the Washington Times, Michael Chertoff poses the question that should be on everyone’s mind as we usher in a new administration: Why has our country remained safe since September 11? Because of concrete policies the president has pursued – policies that range from reorganizing the intelligence community to taking the fight to our enemies, from monitoring terrorist communications to creating the Department of Homeland Security. I don’t think there »

In the company of murderers

David Ignatius is the prominent Washington Post columnist who specializes in foreign affairs. He writes highly regarded espionage novels in his spare time. And he is full of bonhomie toward some of the world’s foremost terrorists and murderers. In September 2003, for example, Ignatius got together for a little chat with Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah. Ignatius’s subsequent column on the interview maddeningly refers to the Hezbollah war of extermination against »

Feliz ‘dinejad: The sequel

As John noted yesterday in “Christmas news,” Mark Steyn coined the seasonal greeting “Feliz ‘dinejad!” in honor of channel 4′s hosting of Mahmoud Ahmedinejad for an alternative Christmas message. At NRO’s Corner, Michael Rubin reports the sequel: The irony of Britain’s channel 4 giving Ahmadinejad the pulpit in the name of free speech is that as he was speaking, Iranian authorities raided and closed down the BBC’s Tehran offices and, »

Hamas calling

An Israeli offensive against Hamas in Gaza appears inevitable at the moment. In the past few days pproximately 100 mortars and rockets have rained down on southern Israel from Gaza. Hamas obviously wants to provoke an engagement with Israeli forces. Among the many reports on the current situation, I find the one by Haaretz correspondents Amos Harel and Avi Issacharoff particularly informative, especially concerning the confusion among Israel’s leaders. JOHN »

Recount update: What the Supreme Court held

I wrote about the most Minnesota Supreme Court order regarding the recount here. On Wednesday the Supreme Court denied Senator Coleman’s petition for relief on the issue of double counting in the recount. The double counting issue involves approximately 130 absentee ballots that the Coleman campaign contends were counted twice for Franken. The Supreme Court deferred consideration of the issue to the election contest. An election contest is a judicial »

In the company of murderers

David Ignatius is the prominent Washington Post columnist who specializes in foreign affairs. He writes highly regarded espionage novels in his spare time. And he is full of bonhomie toward some of the world’s foremost terrorists and murderers. In September 2003, for example, Ignatius got together for a little chat with Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah. Ignatius’s subsequent column on the interview maddeningly refers to the Hezbollah war of extermination against »

Christmas News

The U.K.’s Channel 4, which has a history of offering alternatives to the Queen’s Christmas message, invited Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to deliver this year’s Christmas speech to Britons. A disgraceful choice on several levels, but it did inspire Mark Steyn to come up with one of the great post titles of all time: Feliz ‘dinejad. Would someone please let the Mullahs know that if they’re looking for someone to deliver a »

Christmas News

…to our readers. Once you get going with these animated GIFS… …it can be hard to stop: One more: Merry Christmas! To comment on this post, go here. »

’tis the season to be pardoned

We haven’t written about the pardons President Bush has granted as his second term draws to a close, and I’m reluctant to do so. That’s because it seems rash to assess the merits of particular pardons without delving comprehensively into the facts. And even then, the decision whether to pardon is inherently subjective. In a few cases, such as the outstanding public servant Caspar Weinberger, the wisdom of the pardon »

Merry Christmas!

…to our readers. Once you get going with these animated GIFS… …it can be hard to stop: One more: Merry Christmas! To comment on this post, go here. »

A man with nothing much to offer

David Ignatius reports on his interview with Syrian president Bashar al-Assad. Syria apparently has been engaged in indirect negotiations with Israel, and Assad tells Ignatius he hopes that Barack Obama will assist in the process. Ignatius’ report confirms, however, that Assad is not prepared to offer Israel anything that would make it worthwhile to turn the commanding Golan Heights back to Syrian control: Asked whether Syria was prepared to restrain »

When even slow pitch softball is too fast

Mickey Kaus and his “alert reader D” call our attention to a discussion of “card check” legislation between former Secretary of Labor Robert Reich and SEIU chief Andy Stern. Reich isn’t exactly a tough questioner in this context, but he does attempt to explain to Stern the “perception” in favor of requiring unions to win elections conducted by secret ballot before they are allowed to represent workers. Stern’s response is »

Recount update: Election contest “virtually guaranteed”

The Minnesota Supreme Court has entered an order per Justice Page denying Senator Coleman’s petition for relief on the issue of double counting in the recount. (John Hinderaker described the double counting issue here.) The Coleman campaign believes it has identified approximately 130 double-counted absentee ballots mostly in heavily Democratic Minneapolis precincts. Rather than provide some resolution to the issue during the recount, the Minnesota Supreme Court expressly reserved the »

Politicizing Science

On Saturday, Barack Obama named Harvard professor John Holdren director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Obama said: Because the truth is that promoting science isn’t just about providing resources — it’s about protecting free and open inquiry. It’s about ensuring that facts and evidence are never twisted or obscured by politics or ideology. I could not have a better team to guide me in this »

Sold Out

I went out to do my Christmas shopping today–hey, it’s been a busy month–at our local Barnes & Noble. I intended to buy Michael Medved’s new book, The 10 Big Lies About America for one of my daughters. (If you’re still doing last-minute shopping, it would be a great choice for school-age kids.) I couldn’t find it and asked a young woman at the information desk whether the store had »

The real real Bill Ayers

Pajamas Media has posted the rejected op-ed column by Larry Grathwol responding to Bill Ayers’s New York Times op-ed “The real Bill Ayers.” Ayers’s column is a farrago of propaganda and lies written for the credulous dupes among the Times editors. I noted the column here in “The real Charles Manson.” Grathwol got to know the real Bill Ayers when Grathwol infiltrated the Weather Underground on behalf of the FBI. »

City of gold

In the summer of 2007 I visited Israel with a small group as the guest of America’s Voices in Israel. Our group toured under the guidance of host Fern Oppenheim, who made sure we saw what should be seen and met those whom we should get to know. One of the sites to which Fern took us was the incredibly interesting excavatation of Jerusalem’s City of David, an excavation that »