A Fond Farewell to No Left Turns

Last week I noted here that Peter Schramm of the Ashrook Center at Ashland University is a loyal Power Line reader, but I am remiss in noting along with Jonah Goldberg over on The Corner that the long-running Ashbrook Center blog, NoLeftTurns, is ending its ten-year run.  Although it was our own Scott Johnson who first taught me how to code my very first blog entry (a comment here on PL I believe) back in the Internet stone age when you had to format posts manually, NoLeftTurns is where I broke into blogging.

I think I may have the second-most number of posts on the site after Peter.  In any case, a complete NLT archive will be kept, and if you really want to kill some time you can browse some greatest hits.  I think I may have been the first blogger to call for Trent Lott to step down in this post, and here’s a link to my prediction, right after the 2004 election, that the Democratic Party was likely poised for a comeback.  And here’s my recollection of spending an evening with Ted Turner at his Montana buffalo ranch.  Most of my favorites are like this whimsical 2007 post on why William Shatner was the ideal GOP nominee (leave aside that Canadian birth problem he has–after all, it hasn’t stopped Obama has it?).  It’s been a nice Saturday morning trip down memory lane looking over some old posts.

The end of NoLeftTurns by no means signals a decline of the Ashbrook Center.  Quite the opposite!  The Center is currently in the opening stages of a major expansion campaign, which is likely to see an expansion of my role there as the Thomas Smith Distinguished Visiting Professor.  (I’ll be teaching another course next fall on “American Political Economy,” and some of it may be online, unlike last fall’s course about Hayek.)  The various Ashbrook websites, especially the invaluable TeachingAmericanHistory.org site, will expand, as will the summer master’s degree program for high school history and government teachers.

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