Conservatism

Tom Cotton and the future of Trumpism

Featured image Last night, in a post about Tom Cotton, I suggested that the Senator might be one who, along with President Trump himself, helps “shape Trumpism into a functional, more traditionally conservative but still nationalistic approach to governing.” David Azerrad of the Heritage Foundation discusses the kind of synthesis I had in mind. Perhaps the greatest shortcoming of Trumpist populism, in its current form at least, is that it can at »

Has the Republican Party “surrendered” to Trump?

Featured image I respect Bill Kristol, Sen. Jeff Flake, and every other conservative who takes a principled anti-Trump stand. I don’t much respect Sen. Bob Corker who supported candidate Trump and reportedly wanted to be his Secretary of State, only later to “discover” what most of us knew all along– Donald Trump is a bad guy. I don’t disagree with many of the criticisms leveled at President Trump by Kristol, Flake, and »

The establishment vs. the populists: How deep is the divide?

Featured image Victor Davis Hanson persuasively makes a point I’ve raised less cogently from time to time: The ideological differences between the “establishment” and “populist” wings of the Republican party/conservative movement are overstated: Hanson writes, “the populist-nationalist wing is said to be irreconcilable with the establishment mainstream, but it is hard to see where too many of the lasting irreconcilable differences lie — other than the same old gripe over politicians who »

Mark Steyn returns

Featured image Mark Steyn appeared in Minneapolis as the featured speaker of the Center of the American Experiment’s fall briefing last night. The center’s site is here and its hot new issue of Thinking Minnesota has been posted online here. Let me say at the top that Mark Steyn recommends Katherine Kersten’s cover story on the rot in the Edina public school system. Our own John Hinderaker is president of the center. »

The Alt-Right vs. the Ctrl-Left

Featured image A couple weeks back, before the events in Charlottesville blew up the world and gave a stimulus-style boost to the statue-removal industry (public infrastructure in reverse?), I asked on Twitter for definitions of the “alt-right,” and baited liberal readers to explain how or whether they distinguished between the “alt-right” and the generic “right” that liberals also seem to hate just as much. One reason for doing this is that for »

CRB: In praise of Thomas Sowell

Featured image This morning we conclude our preview of the new (Summer) issue of the Claremont Review of Books. In our preview of the issue I passed over outstanding reviews and essays by Charles Kesler (on campus protest then and now), William Voegeli (on “diversity”), James Ceaser (on the current populist wave), Harvey Mansfield (on “polarization”), Algis Valiunas (on Frank Lloyd Wright), Brian Anderson (on Jane Jacobs) and others. Subscribe at the »

Is the Senate About to Become More Diverse?

Featured image Liberals hate diversity and can’t stand change. So they are toiling 24/7 to assure us that the Trump administration–the aberrational election of a president who is not a professional politician–is a rapidly-unraveling disaster. I doubt that, but time will tell. In the meantime, more unorthodox candidates–better yet, more unorthodox non-liberal candidates–are coming forward, perhaps inspired by the election of a non-politician as president. Yesterday, Caitlyn Jenner said that she is »

The Summer’s Big Event Is Just Five Days Away

Featured image If you live within driving distance of the Twin Cities, you shouldn’t miss it. On the evening of June 17, the activist organization that I run, Center of the American Experiment, will hold its Annual Dinner. The Center’s Annual Dinner is the biggest conservative event in this part of the country. We have hosted speakers like Margaret Thatcher, Mikhail Gorbachev, the first President Bush, Henry Kissinger, Charles Krauthammer, and many »

Coming Up on June 17, the Big Event of the Summer

Featured image If you live within driving distance of the Twin Cities, you shouldn’t miss it. On the evening of June 17, the activist organization that I run, Center of the American Experiment, will hold its Annual Dinner. The Center’s Annual Dinner is the biggest conservative event in this part of the country. We have hosted speakers like Margaret Thatcher, Mikhail Gorbachev, the first President Bush, Henry Kissinger, Charles Krauthammer, and many »

Peter Lawler, RIP

Featured image I’ve just caught up with the sad news this morning of the passing of Peter Lawler of Berry College at the too-soon age of 65. Peter was one of the most interesting and original conservative voices in academia, and he is irreplaceable. There was no one who understood—and practiced—liberal arts education rightly understood better than Peter. Among other things, Peter has to be counted as one of the best interpreters »

Jean Yarbrough explains

Featured image The great Jean Yarbrough teaches government at Bowdoin College. Professor Yarbrough is the author of the indispensable and award-winning book Theodore Roosevelt and the American Political Tradition. We have celebrated Professor Yarbrough several times on Power Line, including via Steve Hayward’s induction of her into our (incomplete) Power Line 100. Professor Yarbrough recently explained to a packed house at Bowdoin how she became a conservative and she gave them something »

How to Get Rich

Featured image When it comes to countries, there really isn’t any dispute. No country has ever gotten rich through high taxes, big government and onerous regulation. And yet, these are the very prescriptions that often are promoted by international organizations and left-wing politicians. Abir Doumit of the Center for Freedom and Prosperity Foundation is here to set the record straight. The path to national success is blindingly obvious, but too often is »

Among the Claremont crowd

Featured image We recently posted a link in our Picks to the article the Chronicle of Higher Education article by Jon Baskin on “The academic home of Trumpism,” but I would like to pause over it here. I take it that the “home” referred to in the headline refers to the Claremont Colleges. The article nevertheless focuses on the the place of our friends at the Claremont Institute and its flagship publication »

My Conservative Vision For All Americans

Featured image Liberals in Minnesota are alarmed about their loss of support in the rural and small-town parts of the state. The same phenomenon that is occurring across the country–everyone is abandoning the Democratic Party except urban dwellers–is going on here. Two Sundays ago, the Minneapolis Star Tribune ran an op-ed by two liberals about how “city mice” and “country mice” can get along better. The key, they suggested, was for all »

Books: The Common Sense of the Subject

Featured image Thomas Jefferson’s famous 1825 letter to Richard Henry Lee explained that the Declaration of Independence was intended to express “the common sense of the subject, in terms so plain and firm as to command their assent. . . an expression of the American mind.” Common sense today is increasingly uncommon, especially when it comes to understanding what the Founders meant by “equality.” (Or maybe the left understands exactly what the »

Who cares about “conservatism”?

Featured image “Tom Hagen” doesn’t. He’s the author of a piece by that name in American Greatness. In form, Hagen’s argument parallels that of Michael Anton (aka Decius), discussed here. Anton’s subject is the “liberal international order.” He argues that it is a means to ends, not an end in itself, and thus must be rated on its ability to serve core American foreign policy interests — peace, prestige, and prosperity. Hagen »

“The administrative state,” what’s that?

Featured image Last week, in a speech to CPAC, Steve Bannon declared that the Trump administration is battling for the “deconstruction of the administrative state.” CNN’s coverage of the speech appeared under the following headline: “Steve Bannon outlines his plan to ‘deconstruct’ Washington.” The Washington Post’s headline (in the paper edition) was similar. It mentioned “deconstruction” but not that which is to be deconstructed — the administrative state. In its story, CNN »