Author Archives: Steven Hayward

The Week in Pictures: Cromnibus Gruber Torture Edition

Featured image This is one of those weeks where the term fratricide fits—too many big stories colliding into one another: the drip-drip torture that is the life of Jonathan Gruber, the drama over the Crominbus spending plan (MUCH more to say about this down the road), the twin meltdowns of Rolling Stone and The New Republic.  And is Al Sharpton still talking?  Sit back and pass the popcorn. Wait, what?: And finally, »

Grubered Again

Featured image I think “Grubered” should enter the modern political vocabulary along side “Borked.”  If “Borked” has come to mean “obstruct (someone, especially a candidate for public office) through systematic defamation or vilification,” then “Grubered” will mean “systematic defamation or vilification of oneself through one’s own words.” Over on TownHall Katie Pavlich has rounded several more videos where Gruber contradicts what he told the House committee earlier this week, namely, his disclaiming »

Oil, Oil, Toil and Trouble [Update]

Featured image Further to our series on falling oil prices, the Dow Jones average closed down about 300 points today, finishing its worst week in more than two years. The usual buzz has it that the fall in oil prices is responsible for this slump. But falling oil prices ought to be a net plus for the economy as a whole and should be good for stocks overall in the long run, »

Stand With Hillary—The Remy Sequel! [John Adds: This Is Hilarious, Don't Miss It!]

Featured image I should have known when I noted the other day the hilarious “Stand With Hillary” video that our pal Remy Munasifi would be on the case.  Here’s his version, suitably entitled “Stand With Hillary, Part 2: The Arkansas Badonkadonk.” Enjoy! »

Tortured Observations

Featured image Amidst the handwringing of the media and liberals (but I repeat. . .) over the Senate Democrats’ attack on the CIA, a few observations. • Why is that when a House committee, run by Republicans, issues a report criticizing government misdeeds or failures—such as IRS political harassment of Tea Party groups or the Benghazi fiasco—the media dismisses it as a mere “partisan” exercise, but when Senate Democrats issue a partisan »

Liberalism Caused Eric Garner’s Death

Featured image George Will notes this morning that the death of Eric Garner by police choke hold came for the high crime of . . . selling an untaxed cigarette, and wonders whether this isn’t an overextension of the “broken windows” theory of community policing: Garner died at the dangerous intersection of something wise, known as “broken windows” policing, and something worse than foolish: decades of overcriminalization. . . Overcriminalization has become »

Minimum Wage, Maximum Ignorance

Featured image It was the University of Chicago’s John Cochrane, one of the celebrated members of the Power Line 100, who wrote that “Once upon a time, the minimum wage, like free trade, was a basic test of whether you were awake in the first week of econ 1. We put a horizontal line in a supply and demand graph. Minimum wages increase unemployment of poor people.” But a higher minimum wage »

Greenpeace Snags Another Green Weenie

Featured image We’ve commented here several times before (here, here, and here, for a start) about the thuggish activities of Greenpeace, whom I once suggested deserved to be considered the John Birch Society of environmentalism, except that the John Birch Society broke no laws and committed no vandalism.  So the best comparison is probably to the Weather Underground, though I’m tempted to rename Power Line’s coveted Green Weenie Award as the Greenpeace »

Before the Storm

Featured image I was up to my neck grading end of semester term papers today, but, as you may have heard if you follow the weather, California is about to get hit with a large storm.  The surf is already epic, so I decided to play hookie for the afternoon and shoot some video.  Here’s a 2:30 highlight reel.  (Power has a way of going out in big storms on my part »

Bill Buckley Was Right, Chapter 2,000

Featured image Everyone remembers Bill Buckley’s famous axiom that he’d rather be governed by the first 2,000 names in the Boston phone book than the faculty of Harvard University. My great teacher Harry Jaffa had a corollary to the Buckley Theorem, which held that it would be better to be educated by the first 2,000 names in the Boston phone book than the faculty of Harvard. Either way, fresh evidence of the »

Green Weenies All Around

Featured image You can’t make this stuff up. From the AP: Lima Climate Talks Set for Record Carbon Footprint The Lima conference is expected to have the biggest carbon footprint of any U.N. climate meeting measured to date. At more than 50,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide, the negotiations’ burden on global warming will be about 1 1/2 times the norm, said Jorge Alvarez, project coordinator for the U.N. Development Program. The »

I’ll See Your Reagan, and Raise You a Clinton

Featured image A handful of House Democrats, led by the egregious Oregon Rep. Earl Blumenauer, have conducted a stunt of bringing a cardboard cutout of Ronald Reagan to the House floor to bolster their case for raising the federal gasoline tax, because falling gasoline prices are simply unbearable if you’re a liberal. “All it takes is a little leadership and courage, like Ronald Reagan and [House Speaker] Tip O’Neill did 32 years »

He’s Baaack! Al Gore Wins Another Green Weenie

Featured image We take time out from the Left’s meltdown over campus rape hysteria, the implosion of The New Republic, and the implosion of the “new Democratic majority” (copyright 2008), to take brief note of . . . Al Gore. Remember him? Gore actually managed to get himself quoted in an obscure news story the other day expressing his sympathy and deep concern for investors in fossil fuels: Former U.S. Vice President »

Good Grief, Has Everyone Gone Mad?

Featured image Paul’s two posts on the tender mercies our colleges are showing to traumatized students being excused from exams sent me back to the wisdom of my mentor M. Stanton Evans, who liked to remind young people: “My generation had it much rougher than yours. Our malls weren’t covered. We didn’t have remotes so we had to get up and change the channel and we had to go through the whole »

Is Opinion Journalism Dead or Dying?

Featured image The self-inflicted death spiral of The New Republic continues to compete with the death spiral of the campus rape narrative at the hands of Rolling Stone, and both may be heralds of a turning point for the slow decline of liberalism. (And now TNR has had to cancel its next issue, due out in a few days, because the mass exodus of its staff has left it fatally shorthanded.) A »

Welcome to “Pique Oil”

Featured image As everyone knows, oil prices have fallen sharply and “unexpectedly” over the last few months, though this is not really unexpected to anyone who believes in markets or technological progress. But confidence in markets and technology does rule out a lot of liberals and virtually all environmentalists. As such, it’s fun to recall his Krugmanness declaring four years ago that “peak oil” was here to stay. In “Our Finite World,” »

Breaking: U.S. Hostage Killed in Failed Raid

Featured image News is coming over the wires right now that Luke Somers and South African teacher Pierre Korkie, held hostage in Yemen by al-Qaeda terrorists, were killed during an attempted rescue raid by American special forces yesterday. Here’s some of the BBC account up in just the last few minutes: UK-born US journalist Luke Somers and South African teacher Pierre Korkie have been killed by al-Qaeda militants in Yemen during a failed »