Author Archives: Steven Hayward

Jean Edward Smith’s Burning Bush

Featured image I’m not going to read Jean Edward Smith’s new biography of George W. Bush for three reasons, one of them coming directly from Smith himself. Smith, the acclaimed biographer of John Marshall, Lucius Clay, and Dwight Eisenhower, once advised me: “Never write a biography of a living person.” He gave lots of good reasons for this counsel, many of which can be easily surmised. I was a little surprised, therefore, »

A Cynical Look at the Olympics

Featured image I haven’t been taking in much of the Rio Olympics. Actually I’ve found the Olympics much less interesting ever since the Cold War ended, since the principal drama of the Olympics back in those days was the heavy ideological subtext, which yielded the parlor game of anticipating the preposterous scores of the East German judges, and guessing which East German women athletes were really men, which only meant those progressive »

Academic Absurdity of the Week: Feminist Chemistry?

Featured image Did you know there is an International Journal for Philosophy of Chemistry? Neither did I, but of course it exists, for there really is no crazy identity politics “intersection” that doesn’t have its own journal read by dozens. The IJPC recently offered up a two-part article on “Gender in the Substance of Chemistry,” by Agnes Kovacs, who you will be unsurprised to learn is a professor of gender studies at »

Your Hillary Hillarity for the Day

Featured image A reader sends along the following joke making the rounds on the interwebs, and it’s too good not to share with all of our readers: THE CLOCK A man died and went to Heaven. As he stood in front of the Pearly Gates, he saw a huge wall of clocks behind him. He asked, “What are all those clocks for?” St. Peter answered, “Those are Lie-Clocks. Everyone who has ever »

NY Times Blasts Obama’s Executive Tyranny

Featured image I’m sure the New York Times didn’t think it was doing what I claim in the headline here with its remarkable story yesterday on Obama’s use of executive power, but what else would you conclude from taking in the direct and cleared-eyed prose of Binyamin Appelbaum and Michael D. Shear: WASHINGTON — In nearly eight years in office, President Obama has sought to reshape the nation with a sweeping assertion »

The Climate Gang That Couldn’t Shoot Straight

Featured image If you’re following the latest sorties of the climate campaign, you’ll know that Senate Democrats, led by Rhode Island Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, are calling for RICO investigations of climate skeptics. Simpleton that I am, I always thought that the RICO statute (short for Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act) was intended chiefly for people named Rico, so it’s application to climate skeptics seems more like an attempt to intimidate climate »

The Week in Pictures: Suction Cup Edition

Featured image Forget the Olympics. The dude climbing Trump Tower with suction cups was the sports highlight of the week, hands down. I’m amazed it isn’t being proposed as a new Olympic sport. Meanwhile, one of the candidates had another terrible week. Lied about things; said stupid stuff to reporters. Yeah, that’s right—it was the one who fancies pantsuits. The media hardly seemed to notice. This week’s gallery, by the way, achieves »

Conservative Bi-Lingualism?

Featured image Those who suffer the handicap, like myself, of having a Ph.D and writing for a living—the kind of people who actually sit in bars discussing, for example, Eric Voegelin’s injunction against “immanentizing the eschaton” (there’s a reason Voegelin devotees don’t get dates, and it’s not hard to figure out)—don’t understand that one reason for Trump’s appeal is that to a great many Americans he talks like they do—in sentence fragments, »

A Whole New Meaning of “Green” Olympics

Featured image I’m not getting in a lot of viewing of the Rio Olympics—actually, none at all—but I gather the Rio folks wanted to be “green” in the conventional environmental way. But it looks like maybe they’ve taken it a bit too far: the swimming pools are turning green from algae: As reported in the Daily Mail, the Olympic organizers “don’t know what happened,” but suspect that strong ultra-violet radiation of the »

Reagan Without Nostalgia

Featured image I’m away at a student conference all week with the Intercollegiate Studies Institute so my postings here are pretty light as the conference schedule is very full, but anyone who is interested in helping balance the rot of “higher” education ought to support ISI. I did break away yesterday long enough to go on the Seth Leibsohn show to talk with Seth and his sidekick Chris Buskirk about how Reagan is »

Hillary Calls for Obama’s Assassination

Featured image People seem to have forgotten this story from May 28, 2008: Clinton Remark on Kennedy’s Killing Stirs Uproar By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE BRANDON, S.D. — Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton defended staying in the Democratic nominating contest on Friday by pointing out that her husband had not wrapped up the nomination until June 1992, adding, “We all remember Bobby Kennedy was assassinated in June in California.” . . . Friday was not the first »

Oh No He Didn’t!!

Featured image Hoo-boy, Trump has really done it now: he’s called for assassinating Hillary Clinton, or her Supreme Court nominees, and probably pulling the ears off the Easter Bunny, too. Here’s the wire service copy anyway: Donald Trump seemingly joked about shooting Hillary Clinton during a speech Tuesday in North Carolina. “If she gets to pick her judges —nothing you can do folks,” Trump said, referring to Clinton getting to nominate Supreme Court justices if she were »

Academic Abomination of the Week: Time Traveling Dogs?

Featured image The time-travel trope of so many science fiction stories are hard enough to take, but what do you get when you cross time-travel with feminist theory? You get this, in the journal Cultural Studies: Time Traveling Dogs (and Other Native Feminist Ways to Defy Dislocations) Angie Morrill, University of Oregon Abstract In this article, I analyze a painting by Modoc/Klamath artist Peggy Ball through a Native feminist reading methodology. The »

Today’s Dose of Crazy. . .

Featured image First up, this tweet from the New York Times over the weekend, which was apparently not a self-parody: Yeah, because we’d all be so much better off if we were still hunter-gatherers. It would have saved us from Joe Camel and Philip Morris. Incidentally, there is evidence in evolutionary biology that the enlargement of the human brain may be linked to our species’ use of fire. One biologist I know »

Climatistas Are Committed, But Should They Be “Committed”?

Featured image Everyone remember Hurricane Katrina in 2005? The climatistas fell all over themselves to rush to attribute Katrina to climate change—it was either Robert F. Kennedy Jr. or Al Gore Jr. (they seem to be in a race to see who can be the crazier carrier of their family legacy) who said Katrina should have been called “climate change,” or “Hurricane Exxon-Mobil” or something. And we were promised that this was »

The Week in Pictures: Trumplosion Edition?

Featured image I’m on the road this weekend—literally on the road, as in by car—so this gallery was actually posted up ahead of time a couple of days ago, during the flurry of media hype about an “intervention” with Donald Trump by senior GOP figures. I doubt this idea is very serious. Is Trump really going to listen to Newt Gingrich? What could go wrong? And what is the right nomenclature for »

The Power Line Show, Ep. 41: Decoding the Religious Right

Featured image One of the surprises of the GOP primary campaign season was the strong support Donald Trump received from many—though not all—evangelical Christian voters. Maybe the so-called “religious right” isn’t as monolithic as the media supposes. In this edition of the Power Line Show, Steve Hayward interviews one of the most insightful observers of the religious right, Michael Cromartie of the Ethics and Public Policy Center. We talk about theology, journalism, »