Author Archives: Paul Mirengoff

Discipline in the 2016 race

Featured image John Sears, Ronald Reagan’s one-time campaign manager, once said “discipline is nine-tenths of politics.” And, as Tevi Troy reminds us: Candidate Reagan put Sears’ dictum into action, running a relentlessly focused communication operation that kept to its message of the day, often to the consternation of the reporters following the campaign. This approach continued into Reagan’s presidency. As the authors of All the President’s Spin put it: “Ronald Reagan’s administration »

Princeton’s troubles, an alumnus’ perspective

Featured image A distinguished alumnus of Princeton comments on the University’s long descent into leftism and its disturbing practice of pandering to infantile race-mongers: The recent events at Princeton University are the culmination of the leftist takeover of Princeton that began in the late 1960s with the rise of people like William Bowen (Provost 1967 to 1972, President 1972 to 1988), Shirley Tilghman (long-time professor, President 2001 to 2013), and many others »

Should a Jew rent from Avis? Part Two

Featured image Avis has apologized for not renting a car this past weekend to Dov Bergwerk, an Israeli business executive and frequent Avis customer. I described Avis’ refusal here. Avis issued the following statement: We have investigated the denial of a rental that recently occurred in Manhattan. We have found that we have been inconsistent in applying our policies with respect to documentation requirements with this customer, who has rented from us »

Ted Cruz surges in Iowa

Featured image A new Quinnipiac poll of likely Iowa caucus-goer shows Ted Cruz surging into a virtual tie for first place with Donald Trump. Cruz comes in at 23 percent, just two points behind Trump. Ben Carson has slipped to 18 percent (from 28 percent in the previous Quinnipiac poll). Marco Rubio is in fourth place at 13 percent. The margin of error is +/-4 points. Cruz is the natural beneficiary of »

Insist on the Gosar amendment

Featured image President Obama’s “Affirmative Furthering Fair Housing” (AFFH) is a stunningly ambitious attempt to force Americans to change the way they live. In essence, it seeks to use the power of the national government to create communities of a certain kind, each having what the federal government deems an appropriate mix of economic, racial, and ethnic diversity. I’ve written about concept here and here (among other posts). Readers may recall that »

Poll: Mitt is considerably more popular than Trump among New Hampshire Republicans

Featured image According to most polls, Donald Trump’s support among Republicans is close to 30 percent, and the conventional wisdom, I think, is that he has the solid support of 20 to 25 percent of Republicans. In a field as crowded as the GOP’s is likely to remain for a good while, even 25 percent support can carry a candidate a long way, and Trump’s number surely will increase as candidates drop »

Phil Hanlon and moral equivalence

Featured image Dartmouth’s president Phil Hanlon has sent a message to the Dartmouth community regarding the rampage of angry, disruptive black students through Baker Library. Hanlon tells us: On Thursday evening, Nov. 12, a large demonstration by members of the Dartmouth and Upper Valley communities culminated in a moment of silence in front of Dartmouth Hall. This demonstration was a powerful expression of unity in support of social justice—Dartmouth at its strongest. »

The specious comparison between Syrians and World War II European Jews

Featured image Historian Josh Zeitz has written an article for Politico called “Yes, It’s Fair to Compare the Plight of the Syrians to the Plight of the Jews. Here’s Why.” Zeitz argues that the current debate over admitting Syrians into the U.S. is comparable to the debate over admitting Jews during World War II because “language commonly invoked in opposition to admitting Syrian refugees bears striking similarity to arguments against providing safe »

Should a Jew rent from Avis?

Featured image In the early 1960s, less than 20 years after the end of World War II, a hot topic in the Jewish community was: should a Jew buy a Volkswagen? I never discussed the matter with my parents, but their answer must have been in the affirmative because my mother ended up driving one, and I don’t think she stole it. In light of this story in the Observer, the question »

James Gillespie reports from Paris

Featured image Our unofficial Paris correspondent, attorney James Gillespie, provides another round of description/commentary regarding the French government’s response to the terrorist attacks of November 13. You can read his first two reports here and here. The first portion of James’ latest report is descriptive and includes new measures proposed by the French government which I found especially interesting. The second portion is James’ commentary, which I commend, in particular, to the »

Is Carson fading in Iowa?

Featured image Politico claims that Ben Carson is “los[ing] his hold on Iowa’s conservatives: Across the state and at a major gathering of politically active evangelicals on Friday night, foreign policy was top-of-mind for the voters and state lawmakers once considered natural constituents for Carson. But after a week of confused comments from the former neurosurgeon and a dismissive critique by his own advisors, Iowans are now consistently voicing doubt about Carson’s »

Headlines highlight Obamacare’s abysmal state

Featured image As most of our readers know, this week the nation’s largest insurer, UnitedHealth, threatened to stop offering insurance plans to individuals through the public exchanges established by Obamacare. Low enrollment and high usage have made participation a losing proposition for the company. If UnitedHealth exits, more than a half million people will have to find other coverage. But this might not be easy. As Katherine Hempstead, who heads the insurance »

Recite from the Koran or die

Featured image Hillary Clinton and Team Obama like to pretend that the terrorism perpetrated throughout the world by Muslims has nothing to do with Islam. Maybe they should tell this to the families of those killed today at the Radisson Blu hotel in Bamako, Mali. According to reports, the terrorists took a large number of hostages, but then released those (reportedly around 20 in number) who could recite a verse from the »

The price of peace at Princeton

Featured image This week, talking with a fellow Dartmouth alum about how the College’s president Phil Hanlon might respond to the grossly abusive behavior of African-American students in Baker Library, I quipped “Hanlon will feel that he can’t discipline anyone so instead he’ll probably spend $5 million on some diversity initiative.” My point was that the objective of college presidents like Hanlon who face angry Black students with no sense of decency »

When a moment of silence is too much to ask

Featured image The Paris terrorists attacks occurred during a six day period of “international” soccer matches — i.e., contests between national teams. In fact, one of the attacks was directed at the Stade de France, where France was hosting Germany. During the remaining matches, there was supposed to be a minute of silence in honor of the victims of the Paris attacks. Unfortunately, this was too much to ask of many Muslim »

A copycat league

Featured image The Ivy League has long been a copycat league, especially when it comes to its students. In the late 1960s, Dartmouth’s radical activists consciously copied our Harvard counterparts. However, Dartmouth’s administration, learning from Harvard’s response, handled our takeover of the administration building with more savvy, thus avoiding much of the post-takeover turmoil we had hoped to generate. Flash forward 45 years or so, and we see black protests over nothing »

The French government steps up its game

Featured image On Sunday, I posted a discussion by Paris lawyer (and Power Line reader) James Gillespie of the measures taken by the French government in response to the Paris attacks, and the legal underpinnings of these measures. Since then, of course, the government has conducted a highly visible (and successful) raid in Saint Denis, just outside of Paris. This, one strongly suspects, is just the tip of the iceberg. To get »