Rotten Apple

Among the many important periodicals that I don’t have time to read is Cigar Aficianado. I’ve been holding out for years for a companion glossy tabloid, Trophy Wife Aficionado, and long thought it was the perfect venture for Donald Trump, but he apparently had other ideas for his next career move. If someone made Trophy Wife Aficionado a package deal along with Marvin Shanken’s other glossy tabloid, The Wine Spectator (which I do read from time to time), then I’d sign up for the whole group.

In any case, a sharp-eyed Power Line reader who is also a subscriber to Cigar Aficionado passes along this interesting news:

The most recent issue of Cigar Aficionado (Jan/Feb 2018) has an opening Editor’s Note by editor and publisher Marvin Shanken and executive editor David Savona titled “Shame on Apple”. (Note that Mr Shanken is a long-time liberal who has long advocated the opening of Cuba, etc.)

The gist is that Apple, a paragon of morality and clean living, has banned CA’s “Where to Smoke” app from their app store. Cigar Aficionado’s staff worked very hard to provide users accurate and up-to-date info on where you can smoke cigars (cigar friendly venues).  This “app” supposedly violated Apple’s policy of  no apps promoting the use of tobacco. The app does not sell cigars, only lets users know where they can enjoy one.

The kicker is that Apple still has many apps that assist people buying marijuana. When this contradiction was pointed out to Apple, they told CA that THOSE apps do NOT violate their policy.

Sounds about right to me. No hypocrisy here…move along.

I’ve been warning for years that if lifestyle liberals have their way, tobacco smoking will be outlawed and pot smoking made mandatory. Looks like we’re one step closer to that utopia. I’ll just add that I’ve long agreed with Mr. Shanken that the U.S. should have lifted its ban on Cuban cigars, on the theory that if we can’t bomb their cities, at least we can burn their crops.

Neat to see the latest issue celebrates the greatest movie of the 1970s:

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