Political correctness

Political incorrectness is alive and well at FIFA

Featured image Will the demise of Sepp Blatter as head of FIFA, the corrupt outfit that governs world soccer, produce meaningful reform? Maybe. But Francois Carrard, the man in charge of leading FIFA’s reform task force has a lot in common with Blatter. Both are 77 years old; both are Swiss; and both hold views that are out-of-fashion, at least when it comes to expressing them. Blatter’s insensitive comments are legendary. They »

A conversation with Christina Hoff Sommers

Featured image In the latest of his Conversations, Bill Kristol draws out former philosophy professor Christina Hoff Sommers on the myriad of subjects to which she has contributed her wit and wisdom over the past 20 years or so (video below, about one hour). Among the subject on which she speaks with authority and interest are the movement for “safe spaces” on campus, how feminism went awry, the war against boys, the »

“The Coddling of the American Mind”

Featured image That’s the title of an important new article out this morning in The Atlantic by social psychologist Jonathan Haidt (author of The Righteous Mind, whom whom I’ve discussed here before) and Greg Lukianoff of FIRE (the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education). Here’s the lede: Something strange is happening at America’s colleges and universities. A movement is arising, undirected and driven largely by students, to scrub campuses clean of words, ideas, »

NR Video on Politically Correct Comedy

Featured image Our pals at National Review are branching out into video production, and I especially like this one out just this morning about the perils of politically incorrect comedy (just under two minutes long): »

Blurred Lines

Featured image One of Jerry Seinfeld’s complaints about political correctness ruining comedy is that “the lines keep moving.” As it happened, I ran across a line that the great Florence King wrote back in 1978 that shows the problem: Feminists won’t be satisfied until every abortion is performed by a black gay doctor under an endangered tree on a reservation for handicapped Indians. Hoo boy, she’d be drummed off of any college »

CRB: Which side are you on?

Featured image Just in time for summer reading, the spring issue of the Claremont Review of Books has arrived. Subscribe here for the heavily subsidized, ridiculously low price of $19.95 and get immediate online access thrown in for free. If you enjoy books and politics, the CRB is the best magazine going. If you enjoy reading about books about politics, ditto. Courtesy of our friends among the CRB editors, I took an »

At the inaugural disinvitation dinner

Featured image Last week on April 15 the William F. Buckley, Jr. Program at Yale inaugurated its annual Disinvitation Dinner. The Buckley Program has written a new chapter in how to take a lemon and make a lemonade. Some kind of congratulations are in order. Its online site is located here. The Disinvitation Dinner was a black-tie affair at the Pierre Hotel in New York. Buckley Program chairman Roger Kimball introduced keynote »

American Sniper: Too Dangerous for the University of Michigan

Featured image The University of Michigan’s Center for Campus Involvement, which sponsors a wide variety of student entertainment, scheduled a showing of American Sniper, the biggest grossing film of 2014 and an Academy Best Picture nominee. This was too much for sensitive Michigan students, who complained that the movie is anti-Muslim and would make them feel “unsafe.” This letter was signed by around 300 Muslim students and others: Anti-Muslim and anti-MENA hate »

How feminism became boring

Featured image 45 years ago, I found feminists to be intellectually interesting. Perhaps this was due to the fact that they were more intellectually interesting than the Marxists I hung out with, but I think there was more to it than that. I now find most feminists boring even compared to Marxists. But Camille Paglia remains extraordinarily interesting. Paglia delivers a virtuoso display in this interview with Nick Gillespie. Among other things, »

Charles Blows Again

Featured image We took note here last summer of the feebleness of New York Times columnist Charles Blow, and now he’s offered up another howler for our instruction. Last week he wrote to complain about the harassment young black males receive from police, and this time it was personal because his son, a Yale student, had been briefly detained at gunpoint on the University’s grounds. Blow’s son’s account went as follows: “I »

Je Suis Hypocrit

Featured image Everyone feels great about proclaiming the slogan “Je suis Charlie,” but as David Brooks points out (okay, okay, get your catcalls and boos out of the way here), if Charlie Hebdo were published on just about any American college campus, the PC police would shut it down as “hate speech.” Jonathan Rauch, who as mentioned here before is an advocate of gay marriage, has some useful observations about the campus »

First They Came for the Sociologists. . . [Updated]

Featured image I’m currently working on a long article analyzing why more academics who know better don’t stand up to the braying mobs of the politically-correct Left. There’s a lot to this problem—stay tuned for the full article when it appears—but one part of it reminds me of the famous quote from Martin Neimoller about the Nazis: First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
because I was not »

A New Lexicon of Liberal Lies

Featured image Periodically someone decodes Liberalspeak—the AmericanThinker had a particularly good one back in 2009, and Tom Sowell updates his periodically—but the British conservative Daniel Hannan has a new one out in the current issue of The New Criterion that is worth taking in.  Here are couple of samples: DIVERSITY: People who look different but think the same way. Diversity applies to race, sex, disability, and sexual orientation. It emphatically does not »

Ferguson cop disciplined after disparaging Michael Brown’s “memorial”

Featured image Timothy Zoll, the spokesman for the Ferguson police department who characterized a makeshift memorial to Michael Brown as a “pile of trash in the middle of the street,” has been placed on unpaid leave. As I discussed here, when the Washington Post contacted Zoll after a motorist ran over the Brown “memorial,” Zoll responded (in part) by saying “a pile of trash in the middle of the street; the Washington »

Pinker Steps Up Against Harvard Anti-Israel BDS

Featured image Paul wrote yesterday about the mendacity of the Israel BDS (“Boycott, Divest, Sanctions”) movement at Harvard, where the presence of a water dispenser made by an Israeli-based company in Harvard dining halls was called a “microaggression” by the permanently aggrieved. Late yesterday the widely noted psychologist Steven Pinker stepped up, writing to Harvard’s president Drew Faust and provost Alan Garber to protest in the strongest possible terms against capitulating to »

Water machines as microaggression

Featured image Increasingly, we hear the term “microaggression” tossed around by the infantile left. But what does it mean? As far as I can tell, a microaggression is an affront — real or imagined for the sake of being affronted — so trivial that few stable adults would notice it and none would give it a second thought. When the term is used, the only aggression in sight is that committed by »

The Rape Hoax Epidemic

Featured image The Daily Caller performs the public service today of looking at eight other notorious campus rape cases that parallel the University of Virginia case that turned out to be hoaxes.  Gee—it really does seem more and more like we’re living in Salem, MA, in 1692. Meanwhile, Christina Hoff Sommers performs her usual public service in going over the witch-burning style ideological hysteria that drives this whole scene in her latest “Factual »