Author Archives: Scott Johnson

My Traveling Star

Featured image Sirius XM has turned over one of its channels to James Taylor 24/7 in connection with the release of his new compact disc. I first saw him perform in a basement dive with Joni Mitchell in Boston in the fall of 1968, a week or two before his first album was released on the Beatles’ label. I’ve been a fan ever since, though I have not kept up with all »

The wrong side of Z Street

Featured image The pro-Israel group Z Street had its application for tax-exempt status held up at the IRS. When founder Lori Lowenthal Marcus asked why, she was told that IRS auditors had been instructed to give pro-Israel groups special attention and that Z Street’s application had been forwarded to a special IRS unit for additional review. Not to put too fine a point on the legal issues, this isn’t kosher. It’s illegal. »

Thoughts from the ammo line

Featured image Ammo Grrrll anticipates Father’s Day this Sunday in GOD BLESS THE DADDIES. She writes: Sunday, of course, is Father’s Day. Despite decades of being portrayed in sitcoms and commercials as brainless twits who would be lost without the superior intelligence of their eye-rolling wives and children, the true importance of fathers can scarcely be overstated. If you doubt me, visit any prison jammed to bursting with lost fatherless men. In »

Right question, wrong answer

Featured image Our congressman is John Kline, a man who served 25 years in the Marine Corps before he retired at the rank of Colonel. He served as a helicopter pilot and was ultimately accorded the responsibility of flying Marine One. He also served as a personal military aide to Presidents Carter and Reagan. When Rep. Kline asks the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff a question bearing on our national »

Prayers for Charleston

Featured image Sen. Rev. Clementa Pinckney and eight churchgoers were murdered during a prayer service at the historically black Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church (also known as “Mother Emanuel) in Charleston, South Carolina last night. The gunman remains at large. Neither the murderer nor the eight other victims have yet been identified by name. The Washington Post reports on the shootings here. The AP has posted a slightly more current story here. »

Notes on Dartmouth commencement ’15

Featured image Our youngest daughter was graduated from Dartmouth College on Sunday morning. We attended the commencement ceremony on the Green in Hanover, New Hampshire. Please forgive the personal nature and limited interest of this post. Herewith, as William Buckley might have said, a few random thoughts that accentuate the positive. Dartmouth holds the commencement ceremony outdoors rain or shine. Five years ago we attended commencement on the Green for our middle »

Kerry’s absolute idiocy

Featured image The Obama administration’s rush to sell us out to Iran presents a spectacle of deception, prevarication, and idiocy the likes of which we have never seen. It is as though Henry Wallace had been given the keys to the kingdom upon the death of Franklin Roosevelt in 1945 instead of Harry Truman and made Alger Hiss Secretary of State instead of Dean Acheson. Among the “parameters” of a final agreement »

Invitation to a microaggression

Featured image Here I quote Elizabeth Price Foley, writing at InstaPundit: The University of California, headed now by former Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, has gone insane with political correctness. The confirmation comes via its new “faculty training guide,” which has conveniently listed some microaggressions to be avoided in the classroom, including: * “I believe the most qualified person should get the job.” * “Affirmative action is racist.” * “Everyone »

The abandonment of Israel

Featured image Michael Oren is the former Israeli Ambassador to the United States and newly elected member of Israel’s Knesset (as a member of the Kulanu Party). He is also an accomplished historian and author. His new book, to be published next week, is Ally: My Journey Across the American-Israeli Divide. I just received an advance copy of the book for a podcast interview with Ambassador Oren to take place later this »

Mark Bauerlein: The State of the American Mind

Featured image Mark Bauerlein and Adam Bellow have edited an intriguing volume of essays reporting on The State of the American Mind: 16 Leading Critics on the new Anti-Intellectualism. The book, officially published by Templeton Press today, presents as a kind of update on Allan Bloom’s The Closing of the American Mind (1987). Closing was published, with a foreword by the late Saul Bellow that helped draw attention to the book. (In »

Horowitz in winter

Featured image FrontPage managing editor Jamie Glazov commissioned me to review David Horowitz’s new book, You’re Going To Be Dead One Day: A Love Story (Regnery, 176 pages, $24.99). Today is the book’s official publication date and the book is now available at Amazon. Jamie has authorized me to post my review on Power Line in the hope that it might introduce new readers to David’s memoiristic books of recent years. This »

Clinton Cash: An update

Featured image The New York Post celebrates Madam Hillary’s rollout rerun with an update from Peter Schweizer on Clinton Cash: Bloomberg and the Washington Post…drilled down and discovered an additional 1,100 hidden foreign Clinton Foundation donations. Since the revelation, the Foundation has only released 24 of the secret foreign donors. When will Americans see the remaining 1,076 names? Hillary hasn’t said. And thanks to the Huffington Post, we now know that in »

The case of Hillsdale College

Featured image The Wall Street Journal’s Kyle Peterson profiles our long-time friend and Hillsdale College President Larry Arnn in “Liberal arts for conservative minds” (accessible here via Google). The occasion of the profile is Larry’s receipt of one of this year’s Bradley Prize awards. Larry is the past president of the Claremont Institute. Here the profile takes a sidelong glance at the work of the institute: The institute’s first program, the Publius »

David & him

Featured image I’m reporting in from New Hampshire, where we are out of the news loop, praying for rain to hold off, and looking forward to our youngest daughter’s graduation from college tomorrow morning. This story from north of the border caught my eye earlier this week. I thought some readers might find it of interest or entertainment value. The beloved Canadian coffee and donuts chain Tim Hortons hopped to the tune »

Thoughts from the ammo line

Featured image Ammo Grrrll calls this one SHLEPPING TOWARDS UTOPIA. She writes: Well, Mattress Girl has evidently graduated from Columbia. In Electrical Engineering, I think. Ha, ha, I kid. Of course it was “Visual Arts.” (Though in fairness, she considered Physics.) Heck, I was a Sociology major, so talk about “High Horse” Syndrome! And she finished in four years whereas it took me three terms: Johnson’s, Nixon’s, and Carter’s. So kudos to »

Stephen Hunter: The case of Tamir Rice

Featured image We first got to know Stephen Hunter when he was the Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post movie critic. He is best known as a successful novelist, and he happens to know a great deal about guns. I, Ripper is his new novel. Published last month, it is in bookstores now. Here he offers his reflections on the case of Tamir Rice on the occasion of a Cleveland judge sounding off on »

Today in appeasement

Featured image Omri Ceren writes to draw attention to Jay Solomon’s Wall Street Journal article “U.S. Strategy in Lebanon Stirs Fears.” Omri writes: Hayya Bina is a Beirut-based civil society NGO that – among other things – works to craft and promote an alternative Shiite identity in in opposition to Hezbollah. The WSJ reported yesterday that the State Department has just cut some of its funding. Not all of its funding, which »