Anti-Americanism

Is Critical Race Training Illegal? [with comment by Paul]

Featured image It may well be, if inflicted on a company’s or government agency’s employees. In July, the City of Seattle required employees to attend training on “Internalized Racial Superiority for White People.” Last week, U.S. Civil Rights Commissioner Peter Kirsanow wrote a letter to Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan, which is embedded below. Kirsanow questioned the legality of the City’s “training” program under federal civil rights law: This training likely violated Title »

Comment on this

Featured image The Pulitzer Prize for Commentary was awarded yesterday to Nikole Hannah-Jones of The New York Times “[f]or a sweeping, deeply reported and personal essay for the ground-breaking 1619 Project, which seeks to place the enslavement of Africans at the center of America’s story, prompting public conversation about the nation’s founding and evolution.” Andrew McCarthy delivered a prize-worthy comment on the award via Twitter (below). Not since Arafat was awarded the »

The New York Times’ hate America project

Featured image I don’t know of anyone who skewers the subversive antics of the American left as savagely, yet as elegantly, as Roger Kimball. In this article for the New Criterion, Roger trains his guns on the New York Times’ 1619 project. That project is, in the words of the Times, an effort to “reframe [America’s] history, [by] understanding 1619 [when the first slave ships arrived here] as our true founding, and »

If you get your news from the Star Tribune

Featured image Star Tribune owner Glen Taylor also owns the NBA’s Minnesota Timberwolves franchise. He recently fired Timberwolves coach Tom Thibodeau in his third season at the helm. “We would like to thank Tom for his efforts and wish him all the best,” Timberwolves owner Taylor said in a statement. “These decisions are never easy to make, but we felt them necessary to move our organization forward.” The Star Tribune is Ilhan »

Hatred of Trump jeopardizes U.S. World Cup bid

Featured image There are two bidders to hold the 2026 World Cup. One is a small country, Morocco. The other is most of a large continent, North America, in the form of a joint bid by the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. This should be no contest. The joint North American bidders have enormous advantages over Morocco in terms of population, stadium size, tourism infrastructure, enthusiasm for the sport (taking Mexico into account), »