Judicial nominees

The importance of a fairly-selected judiciary

Featured image Richard E. Myers II is the Chief District Judge of the United States District Court, Eastern District of North Carolina. He was nominated by Donald Trump and took office on January 1, 2021. Judge Meyers was born in Jamaica. He is of mixed race. Today, he testified before a congressional committee on the subject of “The Importance of a Diverse Federal Judiciary: The Selection and Confirmation Process.” I found his »

How good a judge is Biden’s nominee to the D.C. Circuit?

Featured image Joe Biden has nominated Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to serve on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. She currently sits on the U.S. District Court in D.C. This nomination was 100 percent expected. In fact, there has been speculation that Biden promised to nominate Judge Jackson to pacify radicals unhappy with the selection of Merrick Garland for Attorney General (as if the selections of radical race »

Open judgeships

Featured image Donald Trump and Mitch McConnell did a fine job of filling federal court of appeals judgeships. They left very little on the table for Joe Biden. However, if one looks at federal district courts, a different picture emerges. Trump and Senate Republicans left more than 50 district court judgeships unfilled at the end of Trump’s term. Some of these slots have been vacant for four years or more. These were »

Why the “blue slip” deserves a pink slip

Featured image Majority Leader Mitch McConnell did a bang up job getting President Trump’s Supreme Court and court of appeals nominees confirmed. When it comes to district court judges, things haven’t gone nearly as well for Trump, as a Power Line reader and distinguished alumnus of Dartmouth explains. Accounts of President Trump’s largely successful efforts to reform the federal judiciary overlook an ugly secret: The White House has been blocked from nominating »

Dems oppose appeals court nominee because he is White

Featured image Tom Kirsch is President Trump’s nominee to fill the seat on the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals vacated by Justice Barrett. Kirsch is well qualified for the judgeship, and his nomination has received approval from the Senate Judiciary Committee. However, some Senate Democrats are opposing Kirsch because he is White. For example, Sen. Blumenthal says the Seventh Circuit lacks “diversity,” and that if Kirsch is confirmed, the court will continue »

Let’s not leave court of appeals judgeships on the table

Featured image The presidential race is all over but the shouting (and long may the shouting continue). President Trump is now a lame duck. But this doesn’t mean Trump is without power. He has the power, for example, to nominate federal judges. And with the GOP in control of the Senate, he ought to be able to have them confirmed. As I understand it, there are three vacant court of appeals positions »

Correction on Biden’s judicial nominees

Featured image Last week, I wrote a post about confirming (or not) Joe Biden’s judicial nominees. My post assumed that if the GOP retains control of the Senate, Lindsey Graham will be chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. The assumption is incorrect. If the GOP retains control, Chuck Grassley will be the Judiciary Committee chairman. Grassley intends to exercise his “bumping rights” to regain the gavel. Graham has a long record of »

Will Biden’s judicial nominees be confirmed?

Featured image It seems clear that Joe Biden will be the next president. The make-up of the Senate is less certain. It looks like there will be two run-off elections in Georgia and that the Dems will have to win both to get to 50 seats. Odds are they won’t accomplish this. (I will post about this later today.) Assuming GOP control of the Senate, will Biden be able to have his »

Justice Barrett!

Featured image It’s all done. She’s Justice Barrett now. As Paul has already noted, Democrats have themselves to blame in their expedient decision under Harry Reid to eliminate the filibuster for appellate court nominees—a move determined by entirely short-term considerations of the DC Circuit Court of Appeals that kept blocking overreaching executive branch initiatives from President Obama. I wonder if this bitter experience will give Democrats pause about abolishing the legislative filibuster »

Chuck Schumer reaps what he sowed

Featured image The Senate has voted to confirm Amy Coney Barrett as a Supreme Court Justice. She will be sworn in tonight, probably around the time I finish writing this post. It’s remarkable to me how quickly Mitch McConnell was able to drive this nomination through. I’m also surprised that only one Republican Senator (the embattled Susan Collins) voted against confirming Judge Barrett. President Trump is said by some to be a »

Hamlet of the far north will vote to confirm Judge Barrett

Featured image Lisa Murkowski has announced that she will vote in favor of confirming Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. It now appears that Susan Collins will be the only Republican Senator not to support Barrett’s confirmation. Initially, Murkowski was opposed to confirming Barrett. Her gripe, she said, was with the process. That is, she opposed confirming a Supreme Court Justice, no matter how well qualified, in a presidential election year »

Trump moves to fill Judge Barrett’s court of appeals seat

Featured image The Senate Judiciary Committee has voted to advance Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court nomination to the Senate floor. The Senate is expected to vote on Monday, with confirmation seemingly in the bag. The Judiciary Committee vote was unanimous. Democrats boycotted the session. Committee rules require that two members of the minority party to be present for business to be conducted. However, chairman Lindsey Graham proceeded with the vote anyway. “We’re »

Chuck Schumer: Dems will deny GOP a quorum to advance Barrett

Featured image Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer says that Democrats will not supply a quorum with which to advance the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. Schumer defended this move, saying that Barrett’s nomination is “illegitimate, dangerous and unpopular.” There’s no point debating Schumer on these partisan claims. The question is whether the Democrats can block Barrett’s nomination through this ploy. I don’t think they can. A quorum in »

When is it okay to prevent a woman from speaking?

Featured image After Kamala Harris’ debate with Mike Pence, some female pundits couldn’t contain their glee that Harris had told Pence, on the few occasions when he interrupted her, “I’m speaking.” They saw this as the defining moment of the debate (or claimed to). I wonder how these same female pundits evaluated today’s spectacle of a distinguished female nominee for the Supreme Court being treated as a bystander at her confirmation hearing, »

Dick Durbin’s not so beautiful mind

Featured image In a post below, I complained about how, instead of questioning Amy Coney Barrett, Senators are using her as a prop while they make speeches. Not surprisingly, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, a world class grandstander, was the biggest culprit during three hours or so of the hearing that I watched. Sen. Dick Durbin did a fair amount of speechifying, too. Much of it was directed, not at the issue of whether »

Sheldon Whitehouse’s not so beautiful mind

Featured image I skipped yesterday’s hearing on the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. I didn’t want to waste a day listening to speeches by Judiciary Committee members. In theory, today’s hearing is devoted to questions for Judge Barrett. Yet, in the nearly three hours of the hearing I watched, there wasn’t much questioning. Mostly, there was speechifying. If I’m not mistaken, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse devoted all of »

Democrats attack Judge Barrett with bogus talking point

Featured image Hearings on the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court began this morning. It’s my understanding that today’s hearing was devoted to speeches. I didn’t have the stomach to listen to them. A reader who listened to the first few speeches writes: I’m watching the “hearing” about Judge Barrett’s nomination. Senator Leahy is now describing how “Vermonters” are “scared” that Judge Barrett’s nomination will mean that Vermonters »