The Epic Fraud of Elizabeth Warren

Elizabeth Warren has claimed that she never used her supposed native American heritage for professional advantage, though the circumstantial evidence suggests otherwise. Late this afternoon the Bezos Bulletin reported (though not until the 8th paragraph, with no hint of the key fact in the headline or the lede) that Warren did in fact claim to be “American Indian” in her own handwriting in her application to the Texas Bar in 1986:

This ought to finish Warren, but probably won’t. The next step ought to be a release of Harvard Law School’s records to see whether they relied on representations from Warren about her bogus native American heritage in her personnel file, and counted her as such for “diversity” purposes.

Note how delicately the Post reports this:

Warren filled out the card by hand in neat blue ink and signed it. Dated April 1986, it is the first document to surface showing Warren making the claim in her own handwriting. Her office didn’t dispute its authenticity.

For Warren, putting this chapter behind her is key to calming the nerves of Democrats who want a nominee who can move beyond any problems in their past and present a strong challenge to President Trump.

For the Democratic electorate, roiled by Trump’s racially insensitive comments, it’s become more important for a Democratic standard-bearer to show an understanding of issues related to race and identity.

The nascent 2020 Democratic field is already the most diverse in history, with two black senators, five women, a gay man and an Asian entrepreneur among the announced or potential candidates.

Curious how “diverse” doesn’t include any diversity of thought, since every single person in the field is a deep leftist.

Oh, and her “scholarship” is rather fraudulent, too, as Gail Heriot explored in this paper from 2006.

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