Books

Colin Cancer

Featured image News out of the sports world is that no NFL teams want to sign free agent quarterback Colin Kaepernick, not merely because he may be washed up, but because of his political stunts. An unnamed NFL insider told Bleacher Report: “[Many teams] genuinely hate him and can’t stand what he did (kneeling for the national anthem). They want nothing to do with him. They won’t move on. They think showing »

If “Making It” can make it there

Featured image The Manhattan Institute’s City Journal has posted my column on the restoration to print of Norman Podhoretz’s Making It by New York Review Books. With a nod to Kander and Ebb, I called it “If Making It can make it there.” By “there,” I mean the publisher of the new edition of Making It, which trashed it upon the original publication of the book 50 years ago. Now it rightly »

Eric Posner goes full Slow Joe

Featured image The Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court begins on Monday. Last week Steve Hayward predicted that some idiot would take up the mantle of Slow Joe Biden. “Instead of holding up Richard Epstein’s book Takings,” Steve wrote, “as Joe Biden did with Clarence Thomas in an effort to make Thomas repudiate his philosophy, I wouldn’t be surprised if the banned »

The return of “Making It”

Featured image John Leland interviews and profiles former Commentary editor Norman Podhoretz in today’s New York Times. Leland’s article is “Norman Podhoretz still picks fights and drops names.” It’s an informative profile that looks back on a long career spent at or near the top of the New York intellectual and literary crowd. I would like to add this footnote to Leland’s profile. Podhoretz came of age in the Age of Criticism, »

A Bradley for Philip Hamburger

Featured image I am pleased to note the announcement yesterday that Professor Philip Hamburger is one of four recipients of the 2017 Bradley Prize. The Bradley Prize will be awarded to Professor Hamburger at a ceremony to be held on April 6, 2017 at the Shakespeare Theatre Company’s Sidney Harman Hall in Washington, D.C. The award carries a stipend of $250,000. I wrote Professor Hamburger to congratulate him. I thought readers might »

Books: The Common Sense of the Subject

Featured image Thomas Jefferson’s famous 1825 letter to Richard Henry Lee explained that the Declaration of Independence was intended to express “the common sense of the subject, in terms so plain and firm as to command their assent. . . an expression of the American mind.” Common sense today is increasingly uncommon, especially when it comes to understanding what the Founders meant by “equality.” (Or maybe the left understands exactly what the »

Understanding the administrative state

Featured image For the 20-plus years my friend Bruce Sanborn served as chairman of the Claremont Institute, we attended the annual meeting of the America Political Science Association over Labor Day weekend. At the APSA convention we attended the panels sponsored by the Claremont Institute. It was our idea of a good time. In those panels we heard a lot about “the administrative state,” frequently from Professor John Marini. Professor Marini had »

A great constitutional debate explained (by Steve)

Featured image Most conservatives will be delighted if Neil Gorsuch, as a Justice of the Supreme Court, views the Constitution and his role in interpreting it the way Justice Antonin Scalia did. But George Will hopes that Gorsuch will improve on Scalia. How? By interpreting the Constitution as a charter of government for a nation dedicated to the proposition that all persons are created equal in their possession of natural rights. Scalia »

Boston’s Massacre

Featured image My youngest brother is a historian who specializes in American colonial and Revolutionary War history. He has just published a new book, Boston’s Massacre. Eric is a very good writer, and the Boston Massacre gives him a fun and interesting topic. Here are excerpts from a few of the reviews: In Boston’s Massacre, Eric Hinderaker brilliantly unpacks the creation of competing narratives around a traumatic and confusing episode of violence. »

Patriotism-Palooza

Featured image About that certain book you might have heard mentioned once or twice, I’m finally back from a whirlwind trip doing the usual book promotion stunts in New York and Washington. Here’s a few highlights for folks who haven’t quite got their fill: Turns out yesterday (Wednesday) was a two-fer for Power Liners on the Seth & Chris Show on Patriot Radio. As Paul has mentioned, he was on talking about »

NY Times Notices Disturbance in the Force

Featured image In my new book, which you may possibly have heard about, I include the deliberate provocation that Strauss-inspired political scientists are the most formidable and serious people in the academy today. Although I can defend this proposition, I plopped this out as an assertion, imagining the howls of indignation that might ensue among anyone who caught this sentence. This is preface to noting that twice in the last few weeks »

Sally Yates’s legacy of injustice

Featured image Long-time Power Line reader Howard Root abandoned his legal practice at Minneapolis’s Dorsey law firm and his work as general counsel of a medical device company to design highly useful medical products himself and to found the successful medical device company Vascular Solutions. He has nevertheless chosen to take a hike. In yesterday’s Wall Street Journal Howard gives a glimpse of his harrowing story with a local Minnesota angle. Here »

So Much Patriotism!

Featured image Patriotism may not be enough, but there’s so much patriotism right now that people are going to get tired of all the patriotism! In any case, Jim Bohannon had me back for an encore turn on his Westwood One radio network show last night, and here’s an MP3 recording of it (Correction/update: I had somehow omitted the first segment in the file I posted before, so here’s an additional file of »

CRB: When the going was good

Featured image This morning we continue our preview of the new issue of the Claremont Review of Books. Thanks to our friends at the Claremont Institute, I have read the new issue in galley to select three pieces to be submitted for the consideration of Power Line readers. As always, wanting to do right by the magazine and by our readers, I had a hard time choosing. You, however, can do your »

CRB: The threat to liberty

Featured image You may have heard that our own Steven Hayward has a new book that is available now on Amazon. I read the book in galley and think it is the best book I have read since Philip Hamburger’s Is Administrative Law Unlawful? of 2014. Steve is a gifted teacher and a born storyteller, qualities that are prominently on display in his new book. The themes of Steve’s book culminate in »

Now Is the Time for All Good Power Line Readers. . . (Updated)

Featured image Have I mentioned before that I have a new book coming out? I can’t remember. Just in case I haven’t: Patriotism Is Not Enough will be officially published next week, on February 21, but Amazon is already shipping it starting yesterday, which means you could have your copy by Thursday! And if every Power Line reader orders a copy, it will make the best-seller list, and I might just be tempted »

Our Fascist Moment—and Theirs

Featured image All of this talk from the left of Trump being a fascist is so much twaddle—or projection, since the left tacitly approves of Mussolini’s version of it (“Everything inside the state; nothing outside the state”). But even if there was some truth to the idea, liberals—or at least liberal academics—would be the last to figure it out. How do I know this? Because I’ve checked the academic literature on Hitler »