Culture

Today in the Annals of the Loser Left

Featured image I thought Wonder Woman was overrated, chiefly because I have very little enthusiasm for the whole comic book superhero film adaptations, which all seem unmemorable in as little as 30 minutes after leaving the theater. And they all have the same climax: the hero is losing to the villain, until some magical point when the hero summons up a reserve of hidden strength, or discovers a new dimension of power, »

A Blush of Embarrassment at the NY Times

Featured image Charles Murray likes to describe the wedding announcements section of the New York Times as the “Mergers and Acquisitions” page, since it almost uniformly features a Stanford MBA junior investment banker on Wall Street marrying a Harvard law grad working as an associate at Big Firm on Madison Ave, while rehabbing three Brooklyn brownstones for themselves in between teaching refugees to read while riding a unicycle. The wedding was staged »

The umpire earns a save

Featured image An AP story on the Star Tribune site caught my eye, but the Las Vegas Review-Journal gives it the better headline: “MLB umpire earns save after rescuing woman on Pittsburgh bridge.” Here is the opening by Will Graves: PITTSBURGH — John Tumpane can’t explain why he approached the woman as she hopped over the railing of the Roberto Clemente Bridge on Wednesday afternoon. The woman told Tumpane she just wanted »

Loose Ends (27) [with comment by Paul]

Featured image • I haven’t had a chance to look at anything pertaining to the Senate health care bill, but as Avik Roy is one of my primo go-to guys for health care policy, this tweet is enough to satisfy me: • The House Republican Campaign Committee has put out this short post-GA6 special election victory lap video that makes for fun viewing: But as Glenn Reynolds advises, don’t get cocky. November 2018 »

Come See the Museum of Cluelessness

Featured image I’m currently undercover deep behind enemy lines in Marin County, CA, with what you might call Energy Seal Team Six (see photo at the bottom), though come to think of it, you can tell how bad California is by reflecting that by crossing the Golden Gate Bridge into Marin County, you’ve actually traveled into a jurisdiction that is less insane than the other side of the bridge. Anyway, I was »

Immelt on ice

Featured image My grandfather taught me the adage that “courtesy is cheap and pays big dividends.” It’s a quaint notion nowadays, but it seems to me a sort of democratic equivalent of the golden rule. As a practical matter, courtesy remains cheap and still proves beneficial most of the time. At least it doesn’t hurt. Does it apply in a corporate setting? The question occurred to me when I read last week’s »

Thoughts from the ammo line

Featured image Ammo Grrrll is thinking about MARRIAGE VS. WEDDINGS. She writes: I’m warning readers in advance that I might inadvertently be stepping on some toes today. Truly, I mean no disrespect. Please believe me that if you already had a big wedding, I hope you enjoyed every minute. If you are currently planning a wedding with 400 guests for a son or daughter, mazel tov and more power to you. We »

America’s honor

Featured image In observance of Memorial Day 2007 the Wall Street Journal published a brilliant column by Peter Collier to mark the occasion. The column remains timely and is accessible online here. I don’t think we’ll read or hear anything more thoughtful or appropriate to the occasion today. Here it is: Once we knew who and what to honor on Memorial Day: those who had given all their tomorrows, as was said »

CRB: Mobility and nobility

Featured image This morning we conclude our preview of the new (Soring) issue of the Claremont Review of Books. Thanks to our friends at the Claremont Institute, I have read the new issue in galley to select three pieces to be submitted for the consideration of Power Line readers. As always, wanting to do right by the magazine and by our readers, I had a hard time choosing. You, however, can do »

Michael Barone lampoons “cultural appropriation”

Featured image The concept of “cultural appropriation” is not the most pernicious of the current left-wing dogmas, but I consider it the most ridiculous. Cultural appropriation is defined by Wikipedia as “the adoption or use of the elements of one culture by members of another culture.” Another description for that phenomenon is world history. It’s the most natural thing in the world for members of one culture to “appropriate” from other cultures »

The Colbert cock-up

Featured image In a New York Post column on the “Trump-Russia tinfoil hat brigade,” Paul Sherry turns to the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing at which FBI Director James Comey testified this week. Sherry focuses on Comey’s exchange with an overmedicated Al Franken (as he appeared to me). Franken has become the de facto leader of the tinfoil hat brigade. In this capacity Franken posed a question to Comey that was perfect in »

Dave Carroll was unavailable for comment

Featured image Dave Carroll memorialized his experience as a musician traveling on United nearly a decade ago. He complained in song that United had destroyed his valuable Taylor guitar (video below). The Wikipedia entry on Carroll’s videos has already been updated (footnotes omitted): “On April 9, 2017, #unitedbreaksguitars trended on Twitter. This was following the release of a video that showed United Airlines physically forcing a passenger off a plane in order »

Don’t reaccommodate me, bro

Featured image A United passenger onboard in Chicago to fly to Louisville was dragged from his seat Sunday evening because the trip was overbooked and he declined to follow the airline’s order to make way for airline employees. United called airport law enforcement authorities to have the noncompliant passenger/customer dragged from his seat. Below is the video posted by Business Insider. We still don’t know the passenger’s name, which is perfect. He »

The return of “Making It”

Featured image Many conservatives who follow politics came to know Norman Podhoretz through his work as the editor of Commentary and his own essays, most of which were published in Commentary itself. He moved notably from the left to the right, shed friends and influenced many people like me along the way. He could write the book on How To Lose Friends and Influence People, and more or less has under other »

Remembering Rickles

Featured image The death of Don Rickles last week brought back a flood of memories for me. My father loved seeing him in Las Vegas before Rickles really hit it big, when he was playing in the lounge at the Sahara Hotel. I saw him several times with my dad. Indeed, I saw him several times one night with my dad. Visiting family over Christmas in December 1969, I think, one night »

Why Is Big Business So Liberal? The Pepsi Case

Featured image In 2005, we wrote several posts about a speech that Indra Nooyi, then president and CFO and PepsiCo, gave at Columbia Business School. As described by a Power Line reader who was present, Ms. Nooyi used the fingers of one hand to illustrate the world’s continents (excluding Australia and Antarctica): First was Africa – the pinky finger – small and somewhat insignificant but when hurt, the entire hand hurt with »

Five Came Back to Netflix

Featured image Five of America’s most prominent Hollywood directors volunteered to put their art to use producing documentary, training, and propaganda films in the Army and Navy during World War II. Feeling certain that war was coming to the United States, and wanting to do something about it, John Ford went first, joining the Navy in September 1941. After Pearl Harbor, Ford was followed by Frank Capra, John Huston, William Wyler, and »