Culture

Genesis in Paris

Featured image It’s been a long while since I inflicted my adolescent interest in progressive rock on Power Line readers, mostly because I know it is a rarified taste that only appeals to a minority of similarly idiosyncratic people like me. That’s why I post these in the middle of the night instead of prime time. In any case, there hasn’t been much “new” lately about this by now very old genre. »

Shapes of things (25)

Featured image The New York Times is a sick institution, but it is representative in a way that signifies. It is in the grip of the cultural totalitarian madness that has become something like regular order in the schools, the press, Big Tech and corporate titans, the world of the prestige nonprofits, and other precincts where the sick left holds sway. I would like to say other precincts where reality is optional, »

Shapes of things (19)

Featured image “Death to me!” is the title of the best column I have read on the sordid ritual of public confessions following the “woke” party line. By David Mikics, the column draws on the history of false confessions by Communists caught up in the purges of the Soviet Union’s Stalin era. It is a history with which every literate American should be familiar, but it appears to be as obscure in »

Thomas Sowell: Common Sense in a Senseless World

Featured image Steve Hayward posted the new documentary on the life of Thomas Sowell here last month, but it blew right by me. In case you missed it then, I have embedded it below. It has racked up nearly 3.5 million views and more than 8,000 comments since Steve posted it last month. I realized I had missed it when the Hoover Institution’s Greg Stamps wrote this past Friday: “Thomas Sowell: Common »

A word from Rush

Featured image I wrote Rush on the evening of February 3, 2020, the day he had announced his diagnosis of stage IV lung cancer: Rush: I write for Power Line and you kindly responded to my request for information about one of your [2004] segments on Rathergate back when the film Truth came out in 2015. I just dug out your email message responding to my request in order to get your »

Blame it on the bossa nova

Featured image University of Pennsylvania’s Henry Charles Lea Professor Emeritus of History Alan Kors writes regarding Andrea Mitchell. Mitchell, you may recall, presumed to instruct Ted Cruz on the source of the phrase “full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.” Purporting to correct Cruz’s attribution of the phrase to Shakespeare, Mitchell attributed it to Faulkner while demonstrating her ignorance of both Shakespeare and Faulkner. Mitchell is a prominent NBC/MSNBC reporter and host, »

Inside the 1776 Commission

Featured image Escaping from the memory hole down which Joe Biden has deposited the 1776 Commission and its final report, Victor Davis Hanson comments on the saga in The Classicist podcast below in response to questions posed by Troy Senik. This is a highly illuminating podcast featuring a principal on the right side of the fight for our true history and related issues in the culture war that now threatens our survival. »

Lefty National Youth Poet Laureate to recite at Super Bowl

Featured image Amanda Gorman is our National Youth Poet Laureate. Lucky us. The title isn’t an oxymoron — it’s not impossible for a young person to be a great poet — but the appellation doesn’t sit well on Gorman. “Laureate” means a person who is honored with an award for outstanding creative or intellectual achievement. Gorman has achieved little as a poet, other than being named youth poet laureate. If Gorman has »

A note on the inauguration

Featured image You may have heard that Joe Biden was sworn in as the forty-sixth president of the United States. A new age begins, so to speak: we’ve never had a president this old before. Biden turned 78 this past November 20. And he’s not a young 78 either. As I’ve noted a few times before, he looks like an escapee from Madame Tussauds (and I don’t mean one of the tourists). »

Descent of the adversary culture

Featured image Dartmouth Professor of English Jeffrey Hart opened my mind to the great tradition and more during the four years I was his student. A long-time senior editor at National Review, Professor Hart contributed “The secession of the intellectuals” to NR’s 15th anniversary issue in 1970. Thinking of Power Line’s own 15th anniversary a few years back, I returned to that essay. NR editor Rich Lowry kindly arranged for the publication »

Shapes of things (10)

Featured image The suppression of Parler by the coordinated action of Google, Apple, and Amazon was the inspiration for this series. Parler is a leading indicator of what what Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey calls the “full retro” in the adjacent post. In the annals of Orwellian neologism, that is one for the books. Parler Chief Policy Officer Amy Peikoff appeared for an interview in medias res last night on Tucker Carlson’s FOX »

Homer Canceled

Featured image In the Wall Street Journal, Meghan Gurdon documents the latest stage of our culture’s devolution toward utter stupidity: the cancellation of Homer. A sustained effort is under way to deny children access to literature. Under the slogan #DisruptTexts, critical-theory ideologues, schoolteachers and Twitter agitators are purging and propagandizing against classic texts—everything from Homer to F. Scott Fitzgerald to Dr. Seuss. Their ethos holds that children shouldn’t have to read stories »

Hillbilly Elegy, the movie

Featured image Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance is one the most worthwhile books I’ve read in recent years. It’s a riveting account of Vance’s family as it moved from the hills of Kentucky to an Ohio steel town — Middletown — where it struggled to fulfill some semblance of the American Dream. Hillbilly Elegy is also a sociological study of Middletown and its “hill” population. The story had special resonance for me »

10 favorite films

Featured image I’ve been trying to catch up on reading I skipped in my favorite college courses and revisiting favorite films from years past. I thought just for the fun of it I would serve up my list of 10 favorite films as they occur to me today. When I ran it by a close friend this past Saturday, his only comment was: “How old are you?” Good question! I serve it »

Can Democrats Give Up Identity Politics and White Guilt?

Featured image It is slowly dawning on some Democrats that their uncritical embrace of identity politics and mindless slogans like “defund the police” cost them in this election. Mark Lilla has been trying to warn Democrats about this since Trump won four years ago, though it resulted in Lilla (a committed liberal Democrat) being called a “white supremacist” by several of his Columbia University faculty colleagues. His most recent piece, “When Will »

Mark Steyn Speaks

Featured image As part of last night’s Virtual Gala, American Experiment staff prepared a video on the organization’s achievements over the past year. Unbeknownst to me, the two staffers who produced the gala (including my daughter Kathryn, who is our Event Coordinator), knowing that yesterday happened to be my birthday, reached out to a number of friends, relatives and notables to convey their birthday greetings. They added those birthday best wishes at »

2020: The Summer of Hate?

Featured image One of the legendary milestones of the 1960s was the so-called “summer of love” centered around the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood in San Francisco in 1967, when thousands of “hippies” descended on the town to start their new utopia. Daniel Patrick Moynihan thought the “summer of love” counterculture represented the first heresies of liberalism.  “Who are these outrageous young people?” Moynihan asked. “I suggest to you they are Christians arrived on the scene »