Books

Liberals Double Down on Dumb

Featured image Paul and I have already commented on the invincible ignorance of Sen. Brian Schatz’s comment that invoking “Anglo-American heritage” is racist, and it really does seem as though Sen. Schatz was jumping to someone’s talking points memo about what right-thinking people on the coasts should say about Attorney General Sessions. Because Schatz has company, such as this from the likely next governor of California: Not to be left behind is »

Introduction to the Federalist

Featured image Hillsdale College’s John Miller hosts a series of podcasts on the great books for National Review. NR compiles the podcasts on this page (including access and subscription to the podcasts in the various podcast forms). There is a wealth of riches here. You will want to scroll through the list to find those you want to take in, such as Assumption College’s Professor Dan Mahoney on The Gulag Archipelago. In »

Made for each other

Featured image This past Thursday afternoon my daughter Eliana interviewed Ambassador Nikki Haley for Politico’s Women Rule podcast. Most of the interview is devoted to Haley’s family background, her first interest in politics, her education in foreign policy, and her work at the UN on behalf of the Trump administration. Walking in the footsteps of Daniel Patrick Moynihan and John Bolton, Ambassador Haley is making us proud. Eliana also asked Ambassador Haley »

Charles Murray: Right questions, wrong answers

Featured image Yesterday Charles Murray celebrated his 75th birthday and retired as the American Enterprise Institute’s W. H. Brady Scholar. AEI celebrated his career with an event at which Murray he looked back at his life and thought in a lecture he titled “Right Questions and Wrong Answers.” In the lecture Murray reflected on his career from the time he spent in Thai villages in the 1960s through the writing of landmark »

Fire and Fury, Signifying Nothing

Featured image Never has a paraphrase of Shakespeare’s line been more fitting than with regard to Michael Wolff’s Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House, which has ignited a full-scale bonfire of the vanities in Washington this week. It is a typical example of the superficiality of contemporary journalism: full of detail and juicy gossip—some of it perhaps even true—but utterly devoid of insight and understanding. You might call it “Woodwardism,” »

The Indispensable Churchill Bibliography

Featured image Pursuant to the discussion here and the podcast Scott and I produced about Darkest Hour, a number of readers have asked for recommendations for good biographies and books about Churchill. Here are ten recommended authors and titles. Right off the top, it should be acknowledged that even the most ambitious reader might not be up to getting through all eight volumes of Martin Gilbert’s official biography (the longest biography ever »

2017 in reading

Featured image Every year around this time I look forward to Tevi Troy’s “The Year in Books.” Yesterday, he published this year’s edition. Tevi’s list centers around his attempt “to get a handle on what was going on in our strange political environment.” He leads off with a book by our friend Seth Leibsohn (along with Chris Buskirk) — American Greatness: How Conservatism, Inc. Missed the 2016 Election and What the D.C. »

In place of Time’s top 10 books

Featured image I’ve been pointing to Time’s list of the top 10 non-fiction books of 2017. While conceding I haven’t read any of them, I have noted that any such list on which Hillary Clinton and Ta-Nehisi Coates place in numbers 1 and 2 is some kind of a joke. That’s what Time’s list is. However, it’s not useless. It has prompted me to think about my own top 10 list. I »

A Whittaker Chambers Xmas

Featured image I was reminded that a friend asked me to recommend a book about Whittaker Chambers as a Christmas gift for her smartly conservative daughter a few years ago. Chambers stands at the center of an incredible drama and four fantastic books about it. There is still much to be learned from Chambers and his case. It occurred to me that some readers might appreciate another look at these recommendations including »

John McWhorter Unplugged and Unafraid

Featured image You owe it to yourself to take in a few short minutes of John McWhorter of Columbia University in the video below, starting at about the 14 minute mark, delivering an epic takedown of Scott’s favorite writer, Ta Nehesi Coates, whose work McWhorter characterizes as “dorm lounge performance art.” (McWhorter and his interlocutor Glenn Loury actually take up—and take down—Coates starting around the 4 minute mark; it is worth the »

The Strange Death of Europe

Featured image I’ve been pointing to Time’s list of the top 10 non-fiction books of 2017. While conceding I haven’t read any of them, I have noted that any such list on which Hillary Clinton and Ta-Nehisi Coates place in numbers 1 and 2 is some kind of a joke. That’s what Time’s list is. However, it’s not useless. It has prompted me to think about my own top 10 list. My »

The Second World Wars

Featured image Last week I noted that Time has compiled a list of the top 10 non-fiction books of 2017. While conceding I haven’t read any of them, I noted that any such list in which Hillary Clinton and Ta-Nehisi Coates place in numbers 1 and 2 is some kind of a joke. That’s what Time’s list is. I’m thinking about my own top 10 list. It certainly includes Scalia Speaks: Reflections »

For Christmas: Feminist Baby!

Featured image Included in Target’s selection of books for young children is one titled Feminist Baby, by Loryn Brantz, a writer on feminism and body image for Buzzfeed. If you have always thought that at bottom, to be feminist is to be obnoxious, this book supports your view. A feminist child apparently is one that would normally be described as ill-behaved. This one, I don’t even understand. How is it feminist to »

Scalia speaks

Featured image Time has compiled a list of the top 10 non-fiction books of 2017. I haven’t read any of them, but any list that has Hillary Clinton and Ta-Nehisi Coates at numbers 1 and 2, as Time’s does, is some kind of a joke. My own top 10 list would certainly include Scalia Speaks: Reflections on Law, Faith, and a Life Well Lived somewhere near the top, if not at number »

CRB: The dream and the nightmare

Featured image This morning we conclude our preview of the new (Fall) issue of the Claremont Review of Books. The CRB works eloquently in every issue to further the mission of the Claremont Institute to restore the founding principles of the United States to their rightful place in our national life. In our preview of the new issue I have necessarily passed over several outstanding essays and reviews. Subscribe at the price »

CRB: The founders in full

Featured image This morning we resume our preview of the new issue of the Claremont Review of Books. Thanks to our friends at the Claremont Institute, I read the new issue in galley to select three pieces (this week I have five because I have three today) to be submitted for the consideration of Power Line readers. As always, wanting to do right by the magazine and by our readers, I had »

CRB: The Democrats’ dilemma

Featured image The new (Fall) issue of the Claremont Review of Books is in the mail. Thanks to our friends at the Claremont Institute, I have read the new issue in galley to select three days’ worth of pieces to be submitted for the consideration of Power Line readers. (We have three pieces on the Founders in store tomorrow.) As always, wanting to do right by the magazine and by our readers, »