Books

CRB: Voice of civilization

Featured image We conclude our preview of the Fall issue of the Claremont Review of Books today with the essay by Algis Valiunas on Edward Gibbons’s History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. Algis is a fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center and a contributing editor to The New Atlantis. Algis is also a learned essayist whose work regularly appears in the CRB. His essay on Gibbon »

CRB: Immigration’s hidden costs

Featured image We continue with our preview of the new (Fall) issue of the Claremont Review of Books. If you are a subscriber, it should arrive in the mail just in time to aid your Christmas shopping. If you aren’t a subscriber, you can subscribe for $19.95 by clicking on Subscription Services and get immediate online access thrown in for free. In Reflections on the Revolution in Europe: Immigration, Islam and the »

CRB: What’s left?

Featured image The Fall 2016 issue of the Claremont Review of Books is in the mail and, thanks to our friends at the Claremont Institute, I have read it in galley to select three pieces to be submitted for the consideration of Power Line readers. As always, wanting to do right by the magazine and by our readers, I had a hard time choosing. You, however, can do your own choosing at »

Marc Rich revisited

Featured image In his excellent Politically Incorrect Guide to the Presidents: From Wilson to Obama, Steve Hayward observes of Bill Clinton: “Clinton’s most flagrant abuse of his constitutional power was the pardon.” As Steve recounts, the pardon of Marc Rich represented abuse of authority, gross corruption and ruthless prevarication all in one tidy package. It signfies! With the return of the Marc Rich pardon to the news — courtesy (ahem) of the »

Imagine there’s no media bias

Featured image I originally posted this in February 2015. A reader reminded me of it yesterday. I thought some readers might find it of interest in the event you missed it the first time around. Here it is in slightly revised form: It is impossible to imagine what our political landscape would look like in a world where the mainstream media were fair and impartial. Unlike the utopia conjured by John Lennon, »

Free Kim Strassel!

Featured image YouTube has restricted Kim Strassel’s PragerU short course on The Intimidation Game. It’s almost like they want to prove her point. At least she’s in good company (PragerU tweet below). In a separate tweet, Kim explains that her video “is restricted for any young people with parental controls” as well as “schools and libraries.” Consider it a preview of the next Clinton administration, when Citizens United is to be reversed »

The intimidation game 101

Featured image The folks at PragerU have just alerted us to their new video featuring the Wall Street Journal’s Kim Strassel. In the video below, Strassel teaches a short course in The Intimidation Game, the subject of her new book of the same name. We need a little help with remedies, but this is the short course. PragerU has posted the video and the text along with many, many sharing options here. »

C.S. Lewis on Politics

Featured image I have on several occasions in the past mentioned that C.S. Lewis’s short and elegant book on moral philosophy, The Abolition of Man, could be read as a preface to Leo Strauss’s much more dense Natural Right and History, and further wondered whether these roughly contemporary thinkers were ever aware of one another, despite being in different academic disciplines and in different countries. Clifford Angel Bates, a pal of mine »

Smith reviews Sciolino

Featured image President Obama’s signal foreign policy “achievement,” the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, guarantees and finances the Iranian regime’s development of a nuclear arsenal. It also enhances their regional power until that time. All in all, from the perspective of the national security of the United States and its allies, it must be the stupidest deal of all time. Some Americans nevertheless see it as a brilliant stroke. Take, for example, »

David Satter: Understanding Putin

Featured image In its September 2009 number GQ carried an interesting article by Scott Anderson on the September 1999 apartment bombings in Russia that left hundreds dead and led to Vladimir Putin’s rise to power. The piece profiled former Russian FSB officer Mikhail Trepashkin and collected evidence suggesting that the bombings were perpetrated by the FSB rather than by Chechen terrorists. It was the kind of intriguing investigative piece that most publications »

Appropriate this

Featured image Lionel Shriver is an American novelist who lives in London. I will only add that she is a woman because her adopted name Lionel might lead one to infer otherwise (photo below). On September 8 Shriver gave the keynote speech at the Brisbane Writers’ Festival. Her speech opposed the concept of “cultural appropriation.” The Guardian has posted the text of Shriver’s speech here. Shriver elaborated on her speech in the »

Those Angry Days

Featured image Earlier this year I finished reading Lynne Olson’s Those Angry Days: Roosevelt, Lindbergh, and America’s Fight Over World War II, 1939-1941. I recommend the book unreservedly. There is so much intensely interesting history in the book. Much of the interest derives from the incredible cast of characters that populates the book. The Century Group, with which I was previously unfamiliar, alone supplies a panoply. The text runs over 450 pages »

Stronger unread, WaPo edition

Featured image Yesterday in “Better unread” I noted the humorous Amazon reviews of the new book allegedly by Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine. I want to add that the Washington Post’s Carlos Lozada is as harsh as the Amazon commenters, but then Lozada actually had to read the book: “By the time I finished this book, I resented its existence….I don’t understand why this book was compiled — ‘written’ is too generous »

Stronger unread

Featured image Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine claim the authorship of the campaign manifesto Stronger Together, released in paperback by Simon & Schuster on September 6. The book opens with the kind of bold statement that has served Clinton well in the course of her long career in public life: “It has been said that America is great because America is good. We agree.” Let it not be said that she has »

“Shall we wake the president?”

Featured image Our friend Tevi Troy, author of the excellent What Jefferson Read, Ike Watched, and Obama Tweeted, has written a new book. It’s called Shall We Wake the President? Two Centuries of Disaster Management from the Oval Office. Tevi is a presidential historian and served as an aide to President George W. Bush. He knows whereof he speaks. The book is just out and I haven’t read it. However, Tevi offers »

The secret history of Keith Ellison

Featured image I’m speaking this morning to the Maple Grove Critical Thinking Discussion Group at the Maple Grove Community Center. The meeting convenes at 10:00 a.m. The title of my talk is “The Secret History of Keith Ellison.” Now the title is facetious. Ellison’s history only became “secret” when he ran for Congress in 2006 and staked his campaign on three lies about his involvement with the Nation of Islam. I have »

Bech in Czech

Featured image Paul Mirengoff’s tribute to the courage and the sacrifice of the Czech Olympic champion Vera Caslavska brought to mind one of my favorite passages in the works of John Updike that I have managed to read. Updike was a voluminous and accomplished writer in every literary form, though I think he was a master of the short story in particular. Updike wrote enough stories to fill three small volumes about »