Kanye’s Conversion

You likely have heard about Kanye West’s new album, “Jesus Is King.” West apparently has converted to a quite traditional style of Christianity. This is not surprising in itself, as most African-American churches are conservative, but some, like Andrew Walker at National Review, think it may be important: “Kanye West’s Conversion Could Be a Cultural Wrecking Ball.”

One of the songs on Jesus Is King is “Closed on Sunday.” It is actual music, as opposed to rap, and its lyrics have triggered lots of liberals:

Closed on Sunday, you’re my Chick-fil-A
Closed on Sunday, you my Chick-fil-A
Hold the selfies, put the ’Gram away
Get your family, y’all hold hands and pray
When you got daughters, always keep ’em safe
Watch out for vipers, don’t let them indoctrinate
Closed on Sunday, you my Chick-fil-A
You’re my number one, with the lemonade
Raise our sons, train them in the faith
Through temptations, make sure they’re wide awake
Follow Jesus, listen and obey
No more livin’ for the culture, we nobody’s slave

The Chick-fil-A reference has gotten the most attention; could there be a better ad for the chain? (By the way, the two best things you can order in a fast food restaurant, in my opinion, are the Chick-fil-A Deluxe and Spicy Deluxe.) More important, of course, is West’s declaration of independence from today’s liberal culture, which includes the Democratic Party. His pro-independence message coincides nicely with Candace Owens’s themes.

I doubt that Kanye’s conversion will turn out to be of earthshaking importance, but it is one more instance of African-Americans breaking free from the liberal plantation. The long-term consequences of this growing independence movement will be enormous, and I think we will see some early signs of it in next year’s election.

Here is “Closed On Sunday,” which I actually like. It has been viewed–or listened to, anyway–two and a half million times on YouTube.

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