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Time to Leave Twitter?

Featured image That is what my friend Roger Simon says: “Now Is the Time for All Good Men and Women to Get Off Twitter.” Whatever Jack Dorsey and his minions dislike, whatever threatens them, is automatically banned or, at best, temporarily tolerated with some supercilious notation about its supposed wrongheadedness. (And they claim they’re a public facility—like the phone company.) Almost never do they say with any specificity why they are censoring. »

Voter Fraud: The Crime That Must Not Be Mentioned

Featured image Following the election, the social media monopolies did their best to ban discussion of voter fraud, lest confidence in Joe Biden’s “victory” be shaken. Today, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on their platforms’ political biases and influence. I don’t know what to make of Dorsey. He looks like a homeless person and, based on videos I have seen of his »

Big Tech On Trial

Featured image CEOs of Twitter, Facebook and Google testified today before the Senate Commerce Committee on Big Tech censorship, and its naked support of the Democratic Party. The hearing lasted for nearly four hours. This exchange between Ted Cruz and the apparently homeless Jack Dorsey has been the most discussed moment in the hearing: We may add further clips as they come to our attention. Basically, the Silicon Valley giants are sitting »

Ted Cruz Wants to Know

Featured image Today the New York Post published an explosive expose on Joe Biden. Here are some of the highlights: Hunter Biden introduced his father, then-Vice President Joe Biden, to a top executive at a Ukrainian energy firm less than a year before the elder Biden pressured government officials in Ukraine into firing a prosecutor who was investigating the company, according to emails obtained by The Post. The never-before-revealed meeting is mentioned »

Big Tech Makes War on the Right

Featured image That is an evergreen headline. Here are a couple of instances from today’s news. First, Facebook has pulled Trump campaign ads under its “organized hate” policy. Sounds serious, right? No: the Trump ads were anti-Antifa, and, since Antifa is an organized hate group, you might think Facebook would approve of them. Just kidding. Still, what was the problem? The Trump campaign ads included a red inverted triangle. A Trump campaign »

Trump vs. Social Media [Updated]

Featured image Today President Trump signed an executive order intended to address the problem of liberal bias in the major social media platforms. Reporting on the order has generally been poor. This is some of what it actually says, after a long preamble: Sec. 2. Protections Against Online Censorship. (a) It is the policy of the United States to foster clear ground rules promoting free and open debate on the internet. Prominent »

Can Facebook Be Saved?

Featured image Last year, Facebook hired former senator Jon Kyl and lawyers from Covington and Burling, a prominent D.C. law firm, to look into allegations of bias against conservatives. The Kyl group released its first report today. My impression of the report is that it does a pretty good job of summarizing conservatives’ concerns about the Facebook platform. For example: Hate Organization Designations:​ Facebook prohibits use of the platform by “terrorist groups »

Facebook Marches Left

Featured image Facebook has issued a second Progress Report on its ongoing “Civil Rights Audit.” The report has special reference to the 2020 election and, to put it mildly, it does not inspire confidence. Facebook’s “civil rights” initiative is based on “interviews with over 90 civil rights organizations.” Throughout the current report, the “civil rights community” is referred to as though it were monolithic and authoritative. I am afraid there is a »

Facebook Calls For Censorship

Featured image In an op-ed in the Washington Post, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg called on governments to increase regulation of internet speech. It is easy to understand why Zuckerberg wants governments to tell Facebook what to do. Following regulations will insulate Facebook against liability, and the free speech controversies of recent years have been an unwelcome distraction from Facebook’s remarkably successful business model. Zuckerberg wants government action “in four areas: harmful content, »

Facebook Bans ZeroHedge

Featured image ZeroHedge is one of the most popular news sites on the internet. Its traffic is, I believe, more than ours. Yet it has been banned by Facebook, the great bluenose of our time: Over the weekend, we were surprised to learn that some readers were prevented by Facebook when attempting to share Zero Hedge articles. Subsequently it emerged that virtually every attempt to share or merely mention an article, including »

Facebook Weighs Complaints from Left and Right

Featured image The anti-conservative bias exhibited by Silicon Valley’s tech giants and its impact on our cultural and political life is a huge topic that we have addressed many times. This post will just note a few recent developments. Tyler O’Neil reports on Facebook’s consideration of dueling bias claims: On Tuesday, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg announced a few results from the “civil rights” audit led by former ACLU lawyer Laura Murphy. That »

Is Trust-Busting the Answer?

Featured image Our friend Glenn Reynolds has an op-ed in USA Today in which he urges antitrust enforcement actions against the dominant tech firms: “Donald Trump must bust Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, Google monopolies like Teddy Roosevelt.” Roosevelt built a strong reputation by going after the trusts, huge combinations that placed control of entire industries in the hands of one or a few men. He broke up John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil, the »

DOJ Considers Breaking Up Big Tech

Featured image I wrote last night about the leaked Google video that confirms, once and for all, that Google is an arm of the Democratic Party. Now, word emerges that the Department of Justice has invited 24 state attorneys general to meet for the purpose of discussing possible antitrust actions against the dominant technology platforms: On Thursday, the Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that nearly half of the state attorneys general would »

Whose Side Is Google On?

Featured image The Senate Intelligence Committee held a hearing on Wednesday, to which representatives of Google, Facebook and Twitter were invited. Google declined to attend, perhaps because its representative would have been questioned about why Google privileges the governments of Russia and China over that of the United States. Top executives of Facebook and Twitter–Sheryl Sandberg and Jack Dorsey–did show up. Tom Cotton noted Google’s empty chair while questioning Sandberg and Dorsey »

Facebook Censorship Strikes Again

Featured image As I wrote here, the Left is outsourcing censorship of the internet to the tech companies of Silicon Valley, all of which are happily–if you are a leftist–run by liberals. What the government can’t do, on account of the First Amendment, private companies like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube can do with impunity. Increasingly, conservatives are persona non grata on social media platforms. The latest instance is Salena Zito, one of »

How the Left Is Outsourcing Censorship of the Internet

Featured image Liberals control every newspaper in America, as far as I know, except the Manchester Union Leader. They control CBS, ABC, NBC and every cable network except Fox News. They control what is left of the news magazines, and pretty much every other magazine, too. Only talk radio and the pesky internet lie outside their grasp, so that is where they seek to impose censorship. But they have a problem: the »

Social Media: The Prime Threat to Freedom of Speech?

Featured image In a brief post, John Hayward makes several critical points about the current media landscape: Blogs shattered the Old Media monopoly during the 2004 election. We remember it well. At the time, it seemed like the dawn of a new age. Social media became an instrument to restore the power of the guild. As websites grew dependent on a few big social platforms for clicks, a leash that could tame »