Republicans

Approval of Congressional Republicans Rising

Featured image Gallup finds evidence that the Democrats’ failed impeachment drive hurt them and is benefiting Congressional Republicans: More Americans approve of the job congressional Republicans are doing than of congressional Democrats’ performance — 40% vs. 35%. The rating for Republicans in Congress has risen six percentage points since late October, before the impeachment of President Donald Trump in the U.S. House of Representatives. Over the same period, congressional Democrats’ approval rating »

Impeachment Unites Republicans

Featured image President Trump’s approval ratings among Republicans have set records, for reasons that are easy to understand. And the current impeachment farce has united Republican politicians, as well as the party’s rank and file, behind the president. Much could be said about this, but for now, let’s go with a few tweets. Rand Paul is one of the most independent of Senate Republicans and has clashed with the president from time »

2019, the year Trump completed his takeover of the GOP

Featured image At FiveThirtyEight, Perry Bacon argues that President Trump completed his takeover of the Republican Party this year. I think that’s right. Trump’s control of congressional Republicans is exemplified by the fact that no GOP member of the House voted for his impeachment. Indeed, as far as I know, no GOP member acknowledged that Trump withheld military aid to Ukraine for a time in order to induce the Ukrainian government to »

Jailbreak in Red States

Featured image Daniel Horowitz asks: “Who needs George Soros when you have Republicans. . .enacting his number one agenda item – de-incarceration?” Horowitz’s case in point is Oklahoma: The Koch-funded “conservative” organizations have convinced Oklahoma Republicans to embark on a one-sided mission of prison release rather than stemming the tide of growing crime. They have made them feel guilty about having the highest incarceration rate of any state. Yet rather than identifying »

Most valuable players

Featured image The GOP members of the House Intelligence Committee performed like all-stars in the Schiff impeachment theater, the stalwart Ranking Member Devin Nunes foremost among them. We have previously recognized Rep. Elise Stefanik for her work during the Schiff show. The rest of the GOP members also excelled. I would like to recognize them by name: Mike Conaway (Texas), Mike Turner (Ohio), Brad Wenstrup (Ohio), Chris Stewart (Utah), Will Hurd (Texas), »

Trump and the Senate Republicans on China: Compare and contrast

Featured image This is the 70th anniversary of a dark day in history — the founding of the Chinese Communist dictatorship. Jay Nordlinger correctly calls this dictatorship “one of the great tragedies and horrors of modern times.” John McCormick provides examples of the horrors: A decade [after the revolution], Mao’s Great Leap Forward killed perhaps 45 million people. The Communist regime still denies its people freedom of religion, freedom of speech, and »

Voters Don’t Like Democrats, Either

Featured image It is no shock that most Americans, most of the time, disapprove of politicians and political parties. Thus, the task of a party is not to be universally beloved, but rather, not to be disproportionately disliked. Pew Research has some interesting numbers in this regard: According to the poll, 45 percent of Americans have a favorable opinion of the Democrats, compared with 52 percent who hold an unfavorable view. Those »

Is Scott Taylor the right Republican to challenge Mark Warner?

Featured image Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia is up for reelection in 2020. Warner is a formidable candidate, but he shouldn’t be considered unbeatable. Ed Gillespie came very close to defeating him in 2014. Even so, Republican politicians in Virginia have not seemed eager to challenge Warner. To my knowledge, the only one to enter the race so far is former Rep. Scott Taylor. He threw his hat into the ring earlier »

Estrada’s revenge

Featured image Largely as a result of unprecedented Democratic obstructionism in the United States Senate, President Trump has yet to staff many executive positions in his administration or fill many judicial vacancies. This afternoon comes word that the Republican majority has finally altered Senate rules to reduce debate time on most presidential nominees by reducing post-cloture debate. They have done so by exercising what the media refer to as the “nuclear option” »

McConnell ready to limit debate to counter Dem obstruction of nominees

Featured image For many months, we (along with many other conservatives) have been urging Senate Republicans to reduce the number of hours permitted to debate nominees. This step is necessary because Senate Democrats have used the 30 hours now permitted to stall nominees. The result is an unacceptable backlog of qualified, confirmable nominees. Consequently, judgeships and key administration jobs remain vacant. Now it finally looks like Majority McConnell will pull the trigger. »

Churchill, Trump, and George W. Bush

Featured image I am currently reading Andrew Roberts’ biography of Winston Churchill. So I followed, with interest, the link that someone (probably Scott) put up as a Power Line Pick to this piece by Roberts in the Spectator about his book tour in America. His theme is that Americans, in general, esteem Churchill now more than ever. Which is a good thing. I want to comment on a single paragraph in Roberts’ »

Dems’ left turn dims prospect of a serious Republican challenge to Trump

Featured image The headline of this article by Byron York is: “Dems’ hard-left turn poses dilemma for ‘Never Trumpers.” Actually, I don’t believe the Democrats turn to the hard left is creating a difficult decision for hardcore Never Trumpers. They are determined to bring Trump down whether it means a Joe Biden presidency, a Kamala Harris presidency, or even a Bernie Sanders presidency. Their overriding objective is to see Trump repudiated and »

Dems fill border “compromise” with landmines, GOP doesn’t notice (or doesn’t care)

Featured image Democrats have hoodwinked Republicans on the border compromise legislation that would end the dispute over funding the government. That’s the most charitable interpretation of what has happened. It’s possible that the Republicans who agreed to the deal know about the “landmines” that will undermine the Trump administration and simply don’t care. Mark Krikorian blows the whistle. He writes: The bill is disappointing in many respects, but if it had been »

Stay home, Larry Hogan

Featured image Larry Hogan, the governor of Maryland, reportedly is considering running against President Trump for the Republican nomination. According to Politico, “the second-term Maryland governor has been implicitly going after Trump in speeches, meeting with Never Trump Republicans, and planning a March trip to Iowa as vice chair of the National Governors Association.” Hogan is an old fashioned “good government Republicans” and a political centrist. That’s fine for a Republican governor »

Tom Friedman’s Christmas fantasy

Featured image On Christmas, Thomas Friedman delivers a column better suited for April Fool’s Day. He recommends that Republicans “threaten to fire” President Trump. Friedman writes: I believe that the only responsible choice for the Republican Party today is an intervention with the president that makes clear that if there is not a radical change in how he conducts himself — and I think that is unlikely — the party’s leadership will »

Jailbreak: The head count

Featured image Late last night, the Senate passed First Step, the leniency legislation that will free many thousands of felons from federal prison and shorten the sentences of many thousands of future felons. The vote was 87-12. Here are the 12 courageous Republicans who resisted pressure from the Trump administration and from big-money interest groups like the Koch Brothers, and voted to protect the public from the hardened criminals who populate federal »

FIRST STEP bitterly divides Senate Republicans

Featured image FIRST STEP, the leniency for federal felons legislation being supported by President Trump, may or may not pass the Senate this year. Either way, it has split the Republican caucus. This Washington Post report leaves no doubt about that. The division is encapsulated in dueling National Review articles — one by Sen. Tom Cotton opposing the jailbreak and the other by Sen. Mike Lee supporting it. In another NRO article, »