Republicans

Compared to what?

Featured image As Scott discussed in a post this morning, Gov. Gavin Newsom not only avoided recall, he avoided it quite handily. It seems that nearly two-thirds of the Californians who voted in this election favored sticking with Newsom despite the obvious deterioration of the Golden State and its governor’s foibles. Kyle Smith explains Newsom’s easy victory with a question: “Compared to what?” Conservatives got high on our own supply out in »

A tale of Minnesota crime & politics

Featured image A week ago yesterday one Anton Lazzaro disseminated the following press release regarding the investigation he commissioned to confirm the sibling relationship between Ilhan Omar and Ahmed Nur Said Elmi. Omar and Elmi were “legally” married in 2009. Omar married Elmi for fraudulent purposes — Omar was already in a long-term relationship with Ahmed Hirsi, the father of her three children, whom she subsequently married and divorced to clean up »

“Common good capitalism” vs. the free market kind

Featured image Earlier today, I wrote about an alleged ideological division in the Democratic party between the far left and the establishment. Now, I want to consider an ideological split in the Republican party about which Eliana Johnson filed this report. That gap is related to, but not the same as, the division between hardcore Trump supporters and Republicans who would like to see the Party move on from the ex-president. It’s »

In an upset, Trump-endorsed Texas candidate loses congressional race

Featured image Tuesday was election day in a special race to select a successor to Rep. Ron Wright in Texas’ Sixth Congressional District. Wright died from the Wuhan coronavirus. The candidates were Wright’s widow, Susan Wright, and Texas state Rep. Jake Ellzey. Both are conservative Republicans. Susan Wright was the favorite and the leader in polls. She won the most votes in the primary, in which Ellzey barely finished second, just 354 »

What price bipartisanship?

Featured image Yesterday, the Washington Post reported that the bipartisan infrastructure deal was in a “precarious state” because the Republicans who are a party to the negotiations were balking over details, particularly the idea of beefing up the IRS in order to raise revenue to help pay for the legislation. Today, Politico reports that the needed Republican votes probably aren’t there to agree to anything on Chuck Schumer’s timetable. Schumer has scheduled »

A setback for Stacey Abrams and the Dems in Georgia

Featured image Townhall’s Reagan McCarthy reports on a satisfying election result from Georgia. In a special election runoff race for a state House seat, Republican Devan Seabaugh defeated Democrat Priscilla Smith. Seabaugh collected 63 percent of the vote. The jurisdiction in question, District 34 in the Atlanta area, leans conservative. However, Seabaugh’s margin exceeded that of the GOP candidate in 2020, who received 56 percent of the vote, according to McCarthy’s report. »

Michael Barone to the two political parties: Grow up

Featured image Michael Barone contends that both political parties are failing to respond to signals in the political marketplace. I think Barone is right and has stated the problem neatly. The market signals to the Republican Party are pretty clear. In 2020, the GOP couldn’t defeat an uninspiring Democrat presidential candidate whose mental capacity obviously is diminished, perhaps significantly. The signals to the Democratic Party aren’t faint, either. They couldn’t defeat an »

Compromise, GOP style, cont’d

Featured image Rich Lowry writes at some length urging Republicans abandon the infrastructure deal. He argues that Republicans “have nothing to gain by blessing a portion of President Joe Biden’s spending plans, when an ungodly amount of money is going to go out the door regardless of whether they vote for a chunk of it or not.” Yesterday I linked to and wrote about Marc Thiessen’s Washington Post column supporting the deal »

Compromise, GOP style

Featured image Marc Thiessen has written a good column on the alleged infrastructure compromise bill in process. The column appears in the Washington Post under the headline “Biden’s fake infrastructure ‘compromise’ has thrown Democrats into disarray.” AEI has posted Thiessen’s column in accessible form here. Thiessen describes what sounds like an illusory deal for the GOP: President Biden’s big gaffe was not his threat to veto a $1.2 trillion infrastructure deal he »

Clean-up on WH aisle five

Featured image The editors of the Wall Street Journal seem to me to bring the necessary cynicism to explicating the infrastructure “compromise” that is to preface enactment of the related Dem wish list/prospective spending blowout: Mr. Biden’s statement Saturday changes nothing except the [White House counselor Steven] Ricchetti atmospherics. Mr. Biden spoke the real truth on Thursday. He knows, because Mr. Ricchetti tells him, that Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader »

Where is the love?

Featured image How is the GOP wing of the bipartisan infra dig infrastructure contingent taking their exposure as chumps on the morning after? Let’s go to this afternoon’s Politico Playbook PM for an update: This morning, we reported that Sen. LINDSEY GRAHAM (R-S.C.), one of the 11 Republicans who supported the bipartisan infrastructure framework, was backing out of the deal over President JOE BIDEN’S insistence that he would not sign the bipartisan »

The double-cross system

Featured image It’s hard to believe that a Senator as sophisticated as Rob Portman is a knowing participant in the double-cross system that has been presented to us under the rubric of a “bipartisan deal.” What’s the deal? The editors of the Wall Street Journal describe it bluntly as a “double cross” in their lead editorial (“Instant Bipartisan Double Cross”) this morning: Mr. Biden stood with five Democratic and five Republican Senators »

Tap dancing with Tapper

Featured image CNN’s Jake Tapper recently bragged on a New York Times podcast that he has refused to book Republicans who harbor doubts that the 2020 election was entirely on the square. I read about it in Politico’s Playbook this past Friday and took the statement at face value. However, Byron York documents the pushback of Republicans invited to appear on Tapper’s show since the election who have declined the honor. These »

Regarding Liz Cheney, another take

Featured image Liz Cheney is about to be removed from her post in the GOP House leadership. Some conservatives are quite unhappy about this and some liberals pretend to be. Our friend Jim Dueholm, once a law partner of John and Scott, disagrees. He offers this opinion: I’ve long admired the Cheneys, father and daughter. Liz, like her father, is whip-smart, a reliable conservative, a sure Republican vote in the House, but »

Regarding Liz Cheney

Featured image Rep. Liz Cheney seems destined to lose her position in the GOP House leadership. One could almost infer from her actions that she’s determined to lose it. The mainstream media is playing Cheney’s likely ouster for all its worth. Cheney is now portrayed as a hero who is too good for the current, Trump-dominated Republican Party. (These are some of the same lefty media stalwarts who portrayed Cheney’s father as »

Uncle Tim?

Featured image Historically, giving the out-party’s response to a president’s speech to a joint session of Congress has been a thankless task. That is, in part, because the out-party’s response, typically delivered to a camera in a more or less empty room, looks lame compared to the excitement in the House chamber. Last night may have been different, however. Joe Biden’s snoozefest generated no excitement in the near-empty House, and Senator Tim »

Poll finds Trump’s hold on Republicans strong but weakening

Featured image A new NBC poll finds (at page 19) that 50 percent of Republicans say they consider themselves mainly supporters of the GOP, while 44 percent say them consider themselves mainly supporters of Donald Trump. That’s an extraordinarily high number for Trump, to be sure. However, as Rich Lowry notes, it represents a decline. In January, respondents split evenly, 46-46. In October, it was 54 for Trump and only 38 for »