Coming attractions

The Tocqueville Center at the University of Minnesota is a new organization devoted to the study of liberty and free institutions. It also aims to promote intellectual diversity on campus by creating a forum for the discussion of heterodox ideas in a congenial setting, with upcoming speakers scheduled to include Victor Davis Hanson and Michael Novak.
Next Wednesday, February 15, at 12:15 I’ll be speaking with Eric Black of the Minneapolis Star Tribune at a Tocqueville Center forum on blogging and journalism at Room 25 of the University of Minnesota Law School. King Banaian of SCSU Scholars will serve as the moderator of the program. Pizza will be provided. The event is co-sponsored by the Federalist Society and is both free and open to the public. Please join us if you can.
Eric Tam of the Yale Law Journal symposium team writes to announce the journal’s timely symposium next month:

From March 24-26, The Yale Law Journal will be hosting a symposium on executive power titled “The Most Dangerous Branch? Mayors, Governors, Presidents, and The Rule of Law.” It will cover a wide range of topics, from the scope of the President’s war-conducting powers to mechanisms for limiting the reach of state attorneys general to mayoral attempts to act as independent constitutional interpreters. Through a comparison of executives at multiple levels of government, the symposium will attempt to better understand the nature of the executive role.
Participants will include: Professor John Yoo, the influential (and
controversial) former Bush Administration attorney; Professor Neal Katyal, who will be arguing Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, this term’s most anticipated Supreme Court case; Dean Elena Kagan of the Harvard Law School; and Dean Harold Koh of the Yale Law School.
The discussions should be lively and timely, given the increasing public interest in the limits of executive power and the wisdom of the unitary executive.
If you would like to register for the conference or to obtain further information, please do not hesitate to email us at symposium@yalelawjournal.org. You can also obtain more information on the conference at www.yalelawjournal.org/symposium.

I hope we will be able to assign our New Haven correspondent to cover the symposium. It looks like an event of great interest.

Responses

Coming attractions

The Tocqueville Center at the University of Minnesota is a new organization devoted to the study of liberty and free institutions. It also aims to promote intellectual diversity on campus by creating a forum for the discussion of heterodox ideas in a congenial setting, with upcoming speakers scheduled to include Victor Davis Hanson and Michael Novak.
Next Wednesday, February 15, at 12:15 I’ll be speaking with Eric Black of the Minneapolis Star Tribune at a Tocqueville Center forum on blogging and journalism at Room 25 of the University of Minnesota Law School. King Banaian of SCSU Scholars will serve as the moderator of the program. Pizza will be provided. The event is co-sponsored by the Federalist Society and is both free and open to the public. Please join us if you can.
Eric Tam of the Yale Law Journal symposium team writes to announce the journal’s timely symposium next month:

From March 24-26, The Yale Law Journal will be hosting a symposium on executive power titled “The Most Dangerous Branch? Mayors, Governors, Presidents, and The Rule of Law.” It will cover a wide range of topics, from the scope of the President’s war-conducting powers to mechanisms for limiting the reach of state attorneys general to mayoral attempts to act as independent constitutional interpreters. Through a comparison of executives at multiple levels of government, the symposium will attempt to better understand the nature of the executive role.
Participants will include: Professor John Yoo, the influential (and
controversial) former Bush Administration attorney; Professor Neal Katyal, who will be arguing Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, this term’s most anticipated Supreme Court case; Dean Elena Kagan of the Harvard Law School; and Dean Harold Koh of the Yale Law School.
The discussions should be lively and timely, given the increasing public interest in the limits of executive power and the wisdom of the unitary executive.
If you would like to register for the conference or to obtain further information, please do not hesitate to email us at symposium@yalelawjournal.org. You can also obtain more information on the conference at www.yalelawjournal.org/symposium.

I hope we will be able to assign our New Haven correspondent to cover the symposium. It looks like an event of great interest.

Responses