Higher education

University Suicide Watch, Chapter 5

Featured image Today’s higher education implosion news comes from my graduate alma mater, Claremont Graduate University, which emailed everyone yesterday about the imminent closure of its graduate program in philosophy. I’ll update this if I get any better inside information, but I suspect declining enrollment is the main cause, though I hear many programs at CGU are running deeply in the red, so this may be just the first program to go »

University Suicide Watch, Chapter 4

Featured image When last we checked in on the unassisted suicide-in-progress of American universities, we noted that Hiram College in Ohio is eliminating several departments in the humanities and social sciences, following the similar announcement of a University of Wisconsin branch campus. Today’s humanities demolition derby is occurring at Rider University in New Jersey, as reported this morning in the Wall Street Journal. This news is upsetting the faculty! Cue the world’s smallest »

University Suicide Watch, Part 3

Featured image The suicide of the university proceeds apace: —Item 1 comes from Hiram College in Ohio, which may—gasp!—shrink some tenured faculty positions: Last December, Hiram College wrote to alumni to assure them that an ongoing academic redesign of the 168-year-old liberal arts college, led by President Lori Varlotta, would proceed in an orderly fashion. Foreign language, philosophy and religious studies programs may take the worst hits. “Everybody is scared to death,” one »

Arizona enacts effective campus free speech legislation

Featured image My friend Stanley Kurtz has been working tirelessly throughout the U.S. to persuade state legislatures to pass effective legislation protecting campus free speech at public universities. To be effective, the legislation must go beyond simply banning restrictive speech codes and so-called free speech zones (limited areas where controversial speech is permitted), important though such bans are. It must also establish a system designed to discipline students who engage in speaker »

Prison vs. The Captive Mind?

Featured image It’s apparently big news that it now costs more to house a prisoner in California than it does to send someone to Harvard for a year. From the Los Angeles Times: The cost of imprisoning each of California’s 130,000 inmates is expected to reach a record $75,560 in the next year. That’s enough to cover the annual cost of attending Harvard University and still have plenty left over for pizza »

Scenes from a campus mall

Featured image City Journal has just posted the video below reporting Heather Mac Donald’s experience on the front lines of the campus free-speech war. This video is part of a special collaboration with John Stossel and City Journal contributors (other videos in the series are accessible here). City Journal has posted this video together with a transcript under the heading “The campus free-speech crisis.” Heather joins Stossel to talk about the free-speech »

Amy Wax speaks (YouTube edition)

Featured image We’ve written several times about Amy Wax, the distinguished professor at University of Pennsylvania Law School who has spoken truth to political correctness in the face of threats to her livelihood and attacks on her character. Penn law dean Ted Ruger has now succumbed to demands that Professor Wax be barred from teaching the required first year course on civil procedure. This past Thursday the National Association of Scholars honored »

“Achieving Disagreement” Inside the College Bubble

Featured image One of the best explanations for why colleges and universities seem so insane these days is offered indirectly by one of the smartest left-leaning academics of our time—Cass Sunstein of Harvard Law School. An interesting old article of Sunstein’s entitled “The Law of Group Polarization,” he explains how homogenous groups of people will become more extreme the more they deliberate together, and paradoxically degrade deliberation. And there are few groups »

Deja Vu on Campus?

Featured image Edna St. Vincent-Millay is reported to have quipped that history isn’t one damn thing after another—it’s the same damn thing over and over again. I’ve never verified this quotation, but in any case it seems congruent with Yogi Berra’s similar quip about “déjà vu all over again.” I say this because lately I’ve been reading some old essays from the late John P. Roche, who taught for years at Brandeis University »

The Levy letter

Featured image The Daily Pennsylvanian posted a copy of the letter of resignation submitted by former Penn trustee and Penn Law School Overseer Paul Levy to Penn President Amy Guttmann in its story here, but it may not be accessible to readers in its entirety unless viewed on a desktop computer. The Wall Street Journal recently published an excerpt of the letter as a signal contribution to understanding what Roger Kimball has »

Amy Wax speaks

Featured image We’ve written several times about Amy Wax, the distinguished professor at University of Pennsylvania Law School who has spoken truth to political correctness in the face of threats to her livelihood and attacks on her character. Penn law dean Ted Ruger has now succumbed to demands that Professor Wax be barred from teaching the required first year course on civil procedure. Paul Levy, a now former Penn Trustee Emeritus and »

Amy Wax update

Featured image This Thursday, April 12, the National Association of Scholars (NAS) is holding an event at which it will present Professor Amy Wax with an award for academic courage. I wrote about this event here, with a link to Eventbrite for those who wish to attend. Those who can’t attend the event will still have an opportunity to watch it. NAS tells me it will livestream the event through its Facebook »

Race and college athletics

Featured image Black football and basketball players in big sports schools have a substantially lower graduation rate than do other student groups. Why is that? Several explanations come immediately to the mind of anyone who follows college football or basketball closely. First, football and basketball players at big time programs are admitted to college with test scores far lower than other student groups. These test scores “predict” substantially less academic success for »

Sander comes to Middlebury

Featured image I mentioned the then forthcoming appearance of Professor Richard Sander to speak at Middlebury College in “Darkeness at Penn, take 2” (discussing the Amy Wax affair). Sander is professor of law at the UCLA School of Law. He became interested in the subject of “affirmative action” when he joined the UCLA faculty. Professor Sander is the coauthor (with Stuart Taylor, Jr.) of Mismatch: How Affirmative Action Hurts Students It’s Intended »

Texas A&M cuts ties with Confucius Institute

Featured image I wrote here and here about Confucius Institutes, the vehicle through which China wages ideological warfare on America’s campuses and even at our high schools. I explained: Since 2004, the Chinese government has planted “Institutes” that offer Chinese language and culture courses at colleges and universities around the world, including more than 100 in the United States. As the National Association of Scholars (NAS) documented in this report, the Confucius »

National Association of Scholars event will honor Amy Wax

Featured image We’ve written several times about Amy Wax, the law professor who speaks truth to political correctness at the cost of considerable abuse. I’m happy to report that the National Association of Scholars is holding an event at which it will present Professor Wax with an award for academic courage. It’s good to know that while some groups are targeting Wax, others are honoring her courage. In addition to receiving her »

News: Return to Boulder

Featured image For all of you Rocky Mountain/greater Denver readers, I am doing my Douglas MacArthur act and returning to the University of Colorado at Boulder next Monday, April 9, for one day only, participating once again in the University’s annual Conference on World Affairs, where I’ll once again torment Boulder liberals by praising their environmental “greenbelt” around the town for making the conservative quarantine so much easier to enforce. You can »