Higher education

The ugly news at St. Thomas

Featured image St. Paul’s University of St. Thomas is in the news and the news is ugly. The linked story includes the full text of the messages/statements cited in the column below by Robert J. Delahunty, UST Le Jeune Chair and Professor of Law; Willis Krumholz, UST JD/MBA 2014; and Daniel Berlinger UST JD candidate 2017. Professor Delahunty et al. write: The University of St. Thomas is in the news, and the »

Student Loan Defaults Skyrocket

Featured image The Washington Post reports on what many have recognized for some time as a ticking time bomb: A new analysis of federal student loans reveals the number of people severely behind on repaying their debt has soared in the last year, painting a bleak picture of one of the largest government programs. The Consumer Federation of America released a study Tuesday that found that millions of people had not made »

Fake out!

Featured image Campus Reform reports that Harvard University has created a research guide on “fake news” that identifies dozens of respectable conservative websites as “unreliable” or simply “fake” while rating many of their liberal counterparts as “credible.” Titled Fake News, Misinformation, and Propaganda, the guide links to a Google document titled “False, Misleading, Clickbait-y, and Satirical “News” Sources. The guide links to the Google document with its “huge list of fake news »

A Middlebury update

Featured image A reader alerts us to an important update on the Middlebury debacle with relevant information we haven’t seen reported elsewhere. Two or three days after the thug brigade assaulted Professor Allison Stanger, she returned to the hospital, where she was diagnosed with a concussion. The initial incident occurred March 2; we believe the concussion was diagnosed on Sunday, March 5. Below is the undated message distributed to the Middlebury community »

George Washington U. teaches that only whites can be racist

Featured image A friend and Power Line reader sent me this excerpt from a study guide used at George Washington University in the class of one of his children: Prejudice + Power = Racism * Racism, however, requires institutional power * In the U.S. white people alone hold the institutional power to discriminate on the basis of race * Political power (representation, law, judges) * Economic (wealth, income, banks, CEOs) * Social »

Will law schools discriminate in favor of Tiffany Trump or against her?

Featured image Tiffany Trump, the president’s daughter by his marriage to Marla Maples, is applying to law school. The Washington Post’s report makes two points: (1) children of celebrities normally receive preferential treatment in admission to colleges and law school, but (2) it’s not clear that such treatment will be granted to the daughter of this particular celebrity, the non-liberal President of the United States. Both points are scandalous. They illustrate the »

Academic Absurdity of the Week: Keep On Truckin’

Featured image The idea of a sociologist hanging out and studying the culture of a truck stop cries out for sitcom treatment, or a Saturday Night Live sketch. Or perhaps a scholarly article in the Journal of Cultural Geography: Home away from home: meanings of the American truck stop Stephanie Kozak, University of Kansas Abstract This paper explores the place attachments of long-haul truck drivers to the truck stop. The feelings and »

Title IX from Outer Space

Featured image Not even Edward Wood could contrive a more unbelievable legal regime than the federal Office of Civil Rights and its Title IX “guidance” for colleges and universities (hence my title above), and there is no one who is more adept at plumbing the depths of this matter than Shep Melnick, the Tip O’Neill professor of politics at Boston College. As it happens, I’m hosting him tomorrow (Monday) at noon at »

The scene at Middlebury

Featured image I was in the audience when William Rusher and William Shockley took the stage of an auditorium to debate at Yale in the spring of 1974. I arrived early knowing it would be difficult to get a seat and waited patiently for the event to begin. My patience was not rewarded, however, as the event was shouted down. The fascist aura in the auditorium and on the street among the »

A Better Plan for Campus Subversion

Featured image Nebraska attorney and Power Line Iowa stringer Dave Begley passes along this story about a bill in the Iowa state legislature to require the public universities in the hawkeye state to balance their faculties ideologically by party affiliation: Now another legislator wants to enforce what he calls “partisan balance” among Iowa’s faculty members. Iowa Republican Senator Mark Chelgren’s bill would require that no professor or instructor be hired if his or her most »

With Seth Leibsohn

Featured image I enjoyed being on Seth Leibsohn’s radio program (the Seth and Chris show) yesterday. We discussed the subject of federal legislation to promote free speech on college campuses, a vital subject for anyone who believes in the First Amendment. You can listen to us by going here. »

Man Bites Dog at Stanford

Featured image I’ve mentioned before that I wonder whether job placement ads for college presidents and senior administrators include the proviso, “spinal removal required.” Because college administrators and administration are a larger part of the problem in higher education today that leftist faculty: administrators crumple before every demand of identity-politics pressure groups. Hence it is remarkable to see the Stanford News article “The Threat from Within” yesterday from its former provost, John »

How Congress can promote freedom of speech on college campuses

Featured image We’ve discussed Stanley Kurtz’s effort, in conjunction with the Goldwater Institute, to promote free speech on college campuses through the enactment of state legislation mandating it. Now, Stanley has a proposal that, if enacted, would do even more for campus free speech. Stanley wants federal legislation to make the protection of First Amendment rights a prerequisite of federal financial assistance to America’s colleges and universities. He presents his proposal and »

The trouble with Calhoun

Featured image Having previously declared that the name of Calhoun College was to survive the grand renaming project undertaken by the university, President Peter Salovey was at pains to explain why the university had changed its mind. What was once Calhoun College is now to be Hopper College. What happened? Roger Kimball explores the question in the Wall Street Journal column “Yale’s inconsistent name-dropping” (accessible here via Google). In the column Roger »

What was once Calhoun College is now…

Featured image Yale’s Calhoun College is one of the university’s venerable residential colleges. It’s named after the prominent alumnus John C. Calhoun. Calhoun served as Vice President, Secretary of State, Secretary of War, and United States Senator. He was the also the leading Southern proponent of slavery until his death in 1850. Calhoun is most famous for his advocacy of slavery as a “positive good.” The man did a lot of damage. »

Berkeley then and now

Featured image The Manhattan Institute’s Heather Mac Donald must recently have visited the Berkeley campus of the University of California. In her Winter 2017 City Journal essay “From culture to cupcakes,” Heather takes note of two long quotations in Bauhaus-era typography that adorn the facade of Berkeley Law, as the law school now calls itself. On the left is a passage by Supreme Court Justice Benjamin Cardozo, from a 1925 speech at »

“People’s Park” revisited

Featured image In the first volume of his Age of Reagan, Steve Hayward touches on the “People’s Park” incident of 1969 at Berkeley. Steve recalls: “[P]rotestors tried to tear down the fence, and the usual provocateurs incited protestors to start throwing rocks and bottles at the police. [Then California Governor] Reagan didn’t hesitate to dispatch the National Guard to quell the campus; their efforts included the first ever air raid on an »