Higher education

Ivy League honors conservative justices by not honoring them

Featured image Law professor John McGinnis finds that Ivy League schools are giving short shrift to conservative Supreme Court justices when they confer honorary degrees. Is anyone surprised? The numbers are stark. Of the fourteen honorary degrees bestowed by Ivy League institutions to living Supreme Court justices twelve went to those on the left of the Court. Justice Ginsburg is the champ: she has an honorary degree from every Ivy League university »

Inside higher ed: Reimagine this

Featured image A faithful reader writes from deep inside higher education: One of my responsibilities is tracking down ads for our recent PhDs. I just came across this one for SDI Training Manager. It’s self-parody, and so is good for laughs. Until one looks up the office of the vice chancellor under whom the successful candidate for this $70,000 position (more money, incidentally, than most college professors make) would be working. That’s »

Celebrating Peter W. Schramm

Featured image In “Peter the Great for our time” Steve wrote about the event celebrating the life and career of Peter Schramm after the event held in his honor at Ashland College’s Ashbrook Center earlier this week. Peter is engaged in a death struggle with cancer that has elicited the prayers of his many friends and admirers. The Ashbrook Center has now posted the summary and video of the event here. The »

It’s not easy going green: A comment

Featured image A reader who must remain deep under cover writes to comment on Kathy Kersten’s column “It’s not easy going green.” He writes: Dear Mr. Johnson As a professor in the natural sciences, I get a lot of sustainability emails – and have sometimes seen the linkage between white patriarchiality and our lack of sustainability – the technology of the other cultures was always in harmony with nature (tell it to »

Gelernter on fire

Featured image David Gelernter is an old-fashioned Renaissance man. He is professor of computer science at Yale University, chief scientist at Mirror Worlds Technologies, contributing editor at the Weekly Standard and member of the National Council of the Arts (more here). We have proudly hosted several of his thoughts on the present discontents. Professor Gelernter is the author of books that suggest a kind of Herodotean interest in everything human. Professor Gelernter »

It’s not easy going green

Featured image Our friend Katherine Kersten is a senior fellow at the Center of the American Experiment in Minneapolis. Kathy has a graduate degree from the Yale School of Management and a law degree from the University of Minnesota Law School. She can be reached at [email protected] This important column originally appeared in the Star Tribune and is now posted under the heading “Campus sustainability: Going green is just part of the »

Presumed guilty: Duke revisited

Featured image Last week FIRE’s Greg Lukianoff posted the video below on InstaPundit with a link to this post introducing it. The video is also posted on YouTube with this introduction: In 2006, the nation was rocked by allegations that three Duke lacrosse players had raped a woman named Crystal Mangum at an off-campus party. As Mangum’s story began to unravel, the focus of the case shifted from the supposed criminal behavior »

In praise of Lesley Goodman

Featured image In his elegy of William Butler Yeats, W.H. Auden concludes with this couplet offering advice addressed to an unnamed poet: “In the prison of his days/Teach the free man how to praise.” This morning I want to take a brief timeout to praise Lesley Goodman. Professor Goodman has a Ph.D. in English from Harvard. She is a voracious and learned reader at the beginning of what should be a great »

Donald Kagan reflects

Featured image Yale history/classics professor Donald Kagan is a great old-fashioned scholar and teacher. The author of a classic four-volume history of the Peloponnesian War, he has written many other books of distinction including Pericles of Athens and the Birth of Democracy and On the Origins of War: And the Preservation of Peace. Professor Kagan retired from his position at Yale in 2013. He gave his last lecture to a packed auditorium. »

Invitation to a microaggression

Featured image Here I quote Elizabeth Price Foley, writing at InstaPundit: The University of California, headed now by former Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, has gone insane with political correctness. The confirmation comes via its new “faculty training guide,” which has conveniently listed some microaggressions to be avoided in the classroom, including: * “I believe the most qualified person should get the job.” * “Affirmative action is racist.” * “Everyone »

Are 20 percent of college women sexually assaulted? [With Comment by John]

Featured image The Washington Post is claiming, based on a poll, that “twenty percent of young women who attended college during the past four years say they were sexually assaulted.” That’s an alarming finding. But is it valid? Scott Greer and Blake Neff of the Daily Caller point to flaws in the Post’s study that undermine the 20 percent claim. First, the Post didn’t asked the female students polled whether they were »

The case of Hillsdale College

Featured image The Wall Street Journal’s Kyle Peterson profiles our long-time friend and Hillsdale College President Larry Arnn in “Liberal arts for conservative minds” (accessible here via Google). The occasion of the profile is Larry’s receipt of one of this year’s Bradley Prize awards. Larry is the past president of the Claremont Institute. Here the profile takes a sidelong glance at the work of the institute: The institute’s first program, the Publius »

Thoughts from the ammo line

Featured image Ammo Grrrll calls this one SHLEPPING TOWARDS UTOPIA. She writes: Well, Mattress Girl has evidently graduated from Columbia. In Electrical Engineering, I think. Ha, ha, I kid. Of course it was “Visual Arts.” (Though in fairness, she considered Physics.) Heck, I was a Sociology major, so talk about “High Horse” Syndrome! And she finished in four years whereas it took me three terms: Johnson’s, Nixon’s, and Carter’s. So kudos to »

Committee takes on grade inflation at Dartmouth, Part Two

Featured image My post on grade inflation at Dartmouth prompted responses from two correspondents who are familiar with the situation at institutions comparable to the College. At one institution, grade inflation apparently is rampant, to the point that a student with a GPA in excess of 3.9 fell short of summa cum laude. I wonder what the cutoff GPA at Dartmouth is. My correspondent points to several factors that fuel the inflation »

Antidotes to Silly Commencement Addresses

Featured image So it’s college commencement time, which means graduates are typically subjected to appallingly trite commencement addresses from appallingly trite celebrities whose mediocrity goes unnoticed even when on full live display in front of the new graduates of some of our finest universities. Which may say something about the substantive quality of higher education today. One antidote is the six-minute video George Will has done this week for Prager University on »

Behind Science Fraud, Chapter 7

Featured image New York magazine has a terrific piece up this weekend that tells the whole story of how the Green-LaCour Science magazine article on changing support for gay marriage by way of a canvas was exposed as a fraud—by another graduate student. It’s a long piece, but worth an extra-grande latte and a good slow read. In addition to the details of the fraud itself—which involved LaCour fabricating emails with a »

Standard Deviation Indeed

Featured image This photo is reported to be from the graduation program for Columbia University’s MA degrees in statistics. Two observations: First, the mode is fairly obvious. Second, I’m willing to bet that none of these graduates toted a mattress across the stage when picking up his or her diploma. »