History

Grand Theft Lincoln [With Update by Marco Rubio]

Featured image On this 150th anniversary of Lincoln’s assassination, the Wall Street Journal’s William McGurn performs a public service today rebutting the relentless liberal/“Progressive” attempts to pry Lincoln from the Republican Party and claim that Lincoln, were he alive today, would surely be a Progressive Democrat: On this the 150th anniversary of the day John Wilkes Booth fired his fatal bullet at Ford’s Theater, we have a consensus: Today’s Republicans have no »

The Crusades Haven’t Been In the News Lately

Featured image It has been a couple of months since Barack Obama suggested that the Crusades were somehow on a par with, or even a justification for, 21st-century Islamic terrorism. I objected to Obama’s casual slur at the link, saying, among other things: There was nothing wrong, in principle, with the Crusades. They were an appropriate (if belated and badly managed) response to the conquest of the Holy Land by Islam. Did »

A Stillness at Appomattox

Featured image Today is the 150th anniversary of Lee’s surrender to Grant at Appomattox on April 9, 1865, ending our Civil War. Carl Cannon observes the occasion in this RealClearPolitics column as does Jarrett Stepman in a good Breitbart column. To these columns I would only like to append a brief literary footnote. Bruce Catton’s three-volume history of the Army of the Potomac concludes with Catton’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book A Stillness at »

Fred Siegel Explains It All, Part 4

Featured image In his latest book Revolt Against the Masses, Fred Siegel offers a novel explanation for the roots and character of modern liberalism—one that differs substantially from my own in many ways.  On page 28 of the book he says, “Modern liberalism was born of a discontinuity, a rejection of Progressivism.”  In this installment of our conversation, Fred explains some key parts of his argument here, and he makes a good »

Fred Siegel Explains It All, Part 3

Featured image In this third installment, Fred extends his observations on the Vietnam controversies in the 1960s, the rise of feminism, and current Israeli politics (this video was taped before the recent election).  He also comments on his time with the Democratic Leadership Council, and Michael Walzer of Dissent.  He concludes with some choice comments on Howard Dean and John Kerry.  About 7:30 long: »

Another Blast from the Past: When Biden Teamed up With Helms

Featured image I missed Marc Thiessen’s Washington Post column a couple days ago recalling the time a senator named Joe Biden . . . hmmm, that name seems familiar, doesn’t it?—teamed up with Sen. Jesse Helms (!!!) to interpose themselves in the Clinton Administration’s diplomacy regarding the UN’s International Criminal Court: Biden also surely remembers how in 1998, when the Clinton administration was negotiating a U.N. treaty to create an International Criminal »

Barron’s AP Test Prep Guide equates Clarence Thomas with Fascists

Featured image I’ve been warning for some time about the College Board’s effective mandate that AP U.S. History be taught from a hard-left perspective. But this report by Eric Owens of the Daily Caller leaves me stunned: The latest version of a top-selling study guide for the Advanced Placement European History exam explains the French Revolution with a chart which identifies Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas as a fascist and pairs him »

Remembering the indispensable man

Featured image Today is the anniversary of the birth of George Washington. Of all the great men of the revolutionary era to whom we owe our freedom, Washington’s greatness was the rarest and the most needed. At this remove in time, it is also the hardest to comprehend. Take, for example, Washington’s contribution to the Constitutional Convention of 1787. Washington’s mere presence lent the undertaking and its handiwork the legitimacy that resulted »

A conversation with Bill Bennett

Featured image In the latest of his Conversations, Bill Kristol draws out the eminent Bill Bennett on key moments in his distinguished career. Bill Bennett is a man who needs no introduction to Power Line readers. I will say only that this is great stuff. The interview is posted here, where it is broken into chapters. (It is also available in transcript or podcast form at the link.) My guess is you’ll »

George Washington: father of our country; symbol of its presidency

Featured image In simpler times, the holiday we will celebrate tomorrow was called “Washington’s Birthday.” In truly simple times, it was celebrated on February 22 (the actual birth date) rather than on the third Monday of February. It seems appropriate, then, to write about our first president. I will rely heavily on the great the conservative historian Forrest McDonald. In the preface to his book The Presidency of George Washington, McDonald writes: »

Remembering Mr. Lincoln

Featured image Today is of course the anniversary of the birth of America’s greatest president, Abraham Lincoln. As a politician and as president, Lincoln was a profound student of the Constitution and constitutional history. Perhaps most important, Lincoln was America’s indispensable teacher of the moral ground of political freedom at the exact moment when the country was on the threshold of abandoning what he called its “ancient faith” that all men are »

Thinkin’ about “Lincoln” again

Featured image We’ll be celebrating the anniversary of Lincoln’s birth tomorrow in the usual way, but I wanted to warm up with this look back at the 2012 film Lincoln. Until reading David Brooks’s obtuse column about the film, I was unsure that I knew enough to comment intelligently about it. Brooks persuaded me that I know at least as much as he does, however, and accordingly prompted me to offer the »

Obama again shows his contempt for America and the West

Featured image Earlier today, Scott posted President Obama’s statement about the barbaric murder by ISIS of the Jordanian pilot. Obama took the occasion to warn Americans not to “get on our high horse and think [what ISIS did] is unique to some other place.” It’s not surprising, given his view of our country, that Obama would deny that Americans ever have standing to get on a high horse. But if we can’t »

Barack Obama, a Moral and Historical Ignoramus

Featured image Scott wrote this morning about President Obama’s speech at the National Prayer Breakfast. I think Obama deserves another whack, so here goes. Much of the speech was fine. But the key passage was where he acknowledged the reality of Islamic aggression and terrorism, and then commented on it: But we also see faith being twisted and distorted, used as a wedge — or, worse, sometimes used as a weapon.  From »

Sir Martin Gilbert, RIP

Featured image Sad news from London this morning of the passing of Sir Martin Gilbert, the official biographer of Winston Churchill, and the author of something like 40 other books—many of them big, big books, some of them about Jewish history and the Holocaust. He began his career as a research assistant to Randolph Churchill, and after Randolph died succeeded him as the official biographer, going on to write six of the »

Another Reason to Home School Your Kids

Featured image A faithful reader passes along the snapshot of a high school world history textbook that notes the “fantastic economic results” of Stalin’s management of the Soviet economy back in the glory days of the successive Five Year plans. No wonder people fall for Elizabeth Warren. Here’s the text in case you can’t make out the photo: These forceful means of making the Soviet Union a modern industrial nation took a »

Churchill’s Death, 50 Years On

Featured image This weekend marks the 50th anniversary of the passing of Winston Churchill. The most moving account of the scene comes from the Hungarian-born historian John Lukacs, who traveled from the U.S. to London to attend. It was originally published in The American Spectator years ago (but seemingly unavailable online) and then subsequently included in his fine book, Churchill: Visionary, Statesman, Historian. The Los Angeles Times, of all publications, noted this »