From “Truth” to “Trumbo”

Featured image Hollywood provides a steady left-wing pressure on our politics, our culture, and our collective memory. This year the Rathergate film Truth gave an almost unbelievable example, turning the perpetrators of the greatest journalistic scandal of our times into heroes. John and I tried to set the record straight in the Weekly Standard article “Rather shameful” and the Star Tribune column “Lies upon lies.” As the institutional voice of the left, »

Happy Thanksgiving

Featured image We pause to give thanks Sarah Josepha Hale, the 74-year-old magazine editor who wrote a letter to Abraham Lincoln on September 28, 1863, urging him to have the “day of our annual Thanksgiving made a National and fixed Union Festival.” She explained, “You may have observed that, for some years past, there has been an increasing interest felt in our land to have the Thanksgiving held on the same day, »

The specious comparison between Syrians and World War II European Jews

Featured image Historian Josh Zeitz has written an article for Politico called “Yes, It’s Fair to Compare the Plight of the Syrians to the Plight of the Jews. Here’s Why.” Zeitz argues that the current debate over admitting Syrians into the U.S. is comparable to the debate over admitting Jews during World War II because “language commonly invoked in opposition to admitting Syrian refugees bears striking similarity to arguments against providing safe »

Thoughts from the ammo line

Featured image Ammo Grrrll remembers a different sort of Democrat this week in ASK NOT: I grew up in a rock-ribbed Republican family. My mother’s family hated FDR, who at the time was President for Life like Papa Doc in Haiti. Mama will go to her grave believing that their family was discriminated against by the local Democrats in the Dust Bowl in the Dirty ’30s. At nearly 95, she still speaks »

Margaret Thatcher: Not Stylish Enough For the Victoria and Albert

Featured image Margaret Thatcher stopped Britain’s slide into poverty and irrelevance, and the British Left has never forgiven her. So when someone–her heirs or estate, I assume–offered a collection of her clothing to the Victoria & Albert Museum, which has a huge fashion collection and has often exhibited various sorts of clothes, the V&A declined: A range of items that belonged to Margaret Thatcher are to be sold at auction after the »

Agincourt at 600

Featured image Yesterday was the 600th anniversary of the battle of Agincourt. At the Telegraph, Bernard Cornwell, one of the finest living historical novelists, writes about the battle’s enduring significance. Here are a few excerpts: The battle of Agincourt was fought on a muddy field in northern France 600 years ago on Sunday – St Crispin’s Day, October 25th 1415. Kings, princes, dukes and nobles abounded on either side. It became then »

Netanyahu vs. the Mufti: Why the Controversy?

Featured image Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu stirred up a hornet’s nest when he told the World Zionist Congress yesterday that Hitler’s “final solution” was originally the Grand Mufti’s idea: Netanyahu’s comments have been just about universally denounced. Yad Vashem’s chief historian, Professor Dina Porat, told Ynet that Netanyahu’s statements were factually incorrect. “You cannot say that it was the mufti who gave Hitler the idea to kill or burn Jews,” she said. »

Brooks of the Times

Featured image David Brooks is the prominent New York Times columnist who made a name for himself as a conservative writer at the Weekly Standard and in his early books of comic sociology. At the Times, however, Brooks has gone native. He has become a one-man source of global warming. And I don’t mean climate change. Sometimes he can’t see what is in front of his face, as in his take on »

A word from Stephen Knott

Featured image Stephen Knott is professor of national security affairs at the Naval War College and the coauthor of a new book on the relationship between George Washington, the indispensable man, and Alexander Hamilton, an indomitable genius among the founders. We invited Professor Knott to write something that would allow us to bring the book to the attention of Power Line readers. Professor Knott has graciously responded with this message: Washington and »

Power Line Visits Grand Rapids, Celebrates Gerald Ford

Featured image I’m just back from a whirlwind day and a half in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where I took in the annual meeting of the State Policy Network and delivered a few brief remarks at the Roe Award dinner Thursday night. I was present at one of the early meetings of SPN in the late 1980s with the late Tom Roe of South Carolina. He had a vision to spread a network »

Mondale Reminisces

Featured image Our pal Stephen Knott of the Naval War College has pointed us to the release today by the Miller Center at the University of Virginia of his oral history interview with former Vice President Walter Mondale. There’s lots of interesting political history in this interview, but here are a few highlights, starting with Mondale’s first impressions of Robert and Ted Kennedy when they arrived in the Senate in the early »

AP U.S. History framwork remains biased, as its treatment of immigration shows

Featured image The College Board’s 2014 framework for teaching AP U.S. History was a thoroughly leftist document. Under fire, the College Board issued a new framework in 2015. Unfortunately, as I argued here, the new version, though better, is not a great improvement. John Fonte and our friend Stanley Kurtz illustrate the problem through a detailed look at how the 2015 framework treats the history of immigration in this country. Few will »

WGN TV: Ignorance, Mendacity, or Willful Cluelessness?

Featured image Quite a number of commenters, and several email correspondents, have suggested that I was too generous in attributing WGN TV’s appalling Yom Kippur graphic to ignorance, and suggest active mendacity as a likely explanation. Perhaps someone on the WGN graphics staff did it on purpose for his or her own motives; it will be interesting to see if the results of WGN’s internal investigation are shared with the public and »

When Wyler came back

Featured image This past Tuesday evening Turner Classic Movies put the World War II work of William Wyler in its September Spotlight. Wyler is one of the directors starring in Mark Harris’s Five Came Back on the great Hollywood directors who contributed their services to the war effort. Harris’s book is a deeply researched work of popular narrative history. If there is a bloody crossroads at which art and politics meet, Harris »

Leo Baeck, Berlin, 1935

Featured image Jews begin the observance of Yom Kippur at sundown tonight with the Kol Nidre prayer service. A couple of years ago a Christian friend asked to join us at the service. (We’re happy to have her joining us again tonight.) During the service she pointed in our prayer book to an adaptation of the prayer composed by the progressive German Rabbi Leo Baeck for delivery in German synagogues during the »

Five Came Back to TCM

Featured image Five of America’s most prominent Hollywood directors volunteered to put their art to use producing documentary, training, and propaganda films in the Army and Navy during World War II. Feeling certain that war was coming to the United States, and wanting to do something about it, John Ford went first, joining the Navy in September 1941. After Pearl Harbor, Ford was followed by Frank Capra, John Huston, William Wyler, and »

The College Board’s bad faith power grab

Featured image The Washington Post is running an op-ed by our friend Stanley Kurtz about the College Board’s effort to nationalize the high school curriculum and move it leftward. I understand that Stanley’s op-ed will appear in the Sunday paper edition. It is available online here. We have described the outrageously left-wing slant of the College Board’s new AP U.S. History curriculum framework, a slant not cured in the revised framework. Stanley »