AP U.S. History framwork remains biased, as its treatment of immigration shows

Featured image The College Board’s 2014 framework for teaching AP U.S. History was a thoroughly leftist document. Under fire, the College Board issued a new framework in 2015. Unfortunately, as I argued here, the new version, though better, is not a great improvement. John Fonte and our friend Stanley Kurtz illustrate the problem through a detailed look at how the 2015 framework treats the history of immigration in this country. Few will »

WGN TV: Ignorance, Mendacity, or Willful Cluelessness?

Featured image Quite a number of commenters, and several email correspondents, have suggested that I was too generous in attributing WGN TV’s appalling Yom Kippur graphic to ignorance, and suggest active mendacity as a likely explanation. Perhaps someone on the WGN graphics staff did it on purpose for his or her own motives; it will be interesting to see if the results of WGN’s internal investigation are shared with the public and »

When Wyler came back

Featured image This past Tuesday evening Turner Classic Movies put the World War II work of William Wyler in its September Spotlight. Wyler is one of the directors starring in Mark Harris’s Five Came Back on the great Hollywood directors who contributed their services to the war effort. Harris’s book is a deeply researched work of popular narrative history. If there is a bloody crossroads at which art and politics meet, Harris »

Leo Baeck, Berlin, 1935

Featured image Jews begin the observance of Yom Kippur at sundown tonight with the Kol Nidre prayer service. A couple of years ago a Christian friend asked to join us at the service. (We’re happy to have her joining us again tonight.) During the service she pointed in our prayer book to an adaptation of the prayer composed by the progressive German Rabbi Leo Baeck for delivery in German synagogues during the »

Five Came Back to TCM

Featured image Five of America’s most prominent Hollywood directors volunteered to put their art to use producing documentary, training, and propaganda films in the Army and Navy during World War II. Feeling certain that war was coming to the United States, and wanting to do something about it, John Ford went first, joining the Navy in September 1941. After Pearl Harbor, Ford was followed by Frank Capra, John Huston, William Wyler, and »

The College Board’s bad faith power grab

Featured image The Washington Post is running an op-ed by our friend Stanley Kurtz about the College Board’s effort to nationalize the high school curriculum and move it leftward. I understand that Stanley’s op-ed will appear in the Sunday paper edition. It is available online here. We have described the outrageously left-wing slant of the College Board’s new AP U.S. History curriculum framework, a slant not cured in the revised framework. Stanley »

A day to be proud…

Featured image I first wrote about Rick Rescorla in 2003 after finishing James Stewart’s Heart of a Soldier, the book based on Stewart’s New Yorker article “The real heroes are dead.” (“The real heroes are dead” is what Rescorla would say in response to recognition of his heroism on the battlefield in Vietnam.) It’s a good book that touches on profound themes in a thought-provoking way: life and death, love and friendship, »

Some call it “Truth”

Featured image The movie Truth premieres tonight at the Toronto Film Festival. The BBC includes it on its list of ones to watch. Based on former CBS producer Mary Mapes’s memoir Truth and Duty, the film retells the Rathergate story from the perspective of Rather and Mapes. It stars Robert Redford as Rather and Cate Blanchett as Mapes. Luck might be a better name for the movie; some people have all of »

Don’t blame Louie Gohmert for Clinton’s destruction of documents

Featured image Attempting to defend Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email system, James Carville said, “I suspect she didn’t want [Congressman] Louie Gohmert riffling through her e-mails, which seems to me to be a kind of reasonable position for someone to take.” Reasonable, as Shannen Coffin says, only if she was not too concerned with complying with the law. But Clinton’s penchant for making sure that her records can’t be reviewed »

Exclusive: Should the GOP Steal Jefferson from Dems? [With Comment by John on Jackson]

Featured image One of my fellow cruisers on the Baltic Sea last week was Seth Lipsky of the New York Sun, who wrote a terrific column about 10 days ago for the New York Post arguing that since Democrats are giving up on Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson (because, at bottom, Democrats dislike and/or are ashamed of America’s history), Republicans ought to steal Jefferson away from them. Of course, Lincoln already did »

Enter Sensenbrenner

Featured image The endless saga of the proposed Eisenhower Memorial is a horror story. In his latest report on it, Andrew Ferguson introduces the theme of monstrosity: “Like Lazarus, or maybe Frankenstein’s monster, the appalling plan for the Eisenhower Memorial in Washington, D.C., appears to be sputtering to life once more. Only two months ago it seemed safely kaput.” The saga also works a variation on a vampire tale. Someone is going »

Empire populism

Featured image The Republican party of Kentucky has approved a rule change that will allow Rand Paul to run for president while seeking reelection to the Senate. That’s the good news for Sen. Paul. The bad news is that, according to the RCP poll average, Paul’s share of the GOP vote stands at 4.3 percent. This puts him a three-way tie for 8th place with Mike Huckabee and John Kasich. That’s quite »

AP U.S. History — reports from the front lines

Featured image I’ve written frequently about the College Board’s efforts to indoctrinate high school students with a left-wing narrative of American history, via its framework for teaching AP U.S. History. What’s been missing from my reports is the views of those on the front line — the teachers upon whom the College Board’s framework has been imposed. Stanley Kurtz fills this gap with reports from two stellar history teachers, Elizabeth Altham and »

Voegelin on America, Part 2

Featured image Last Sunday I mentioned appreciating Eric Voegelin’s Autobiographical Reflections. Here’s another passage that reinforces the point that America is superior to Europe in terms of philosophy and relevant thinking, based on his first extended visit to the U.S. in the early 1920s. (Voegelin could be pretty dense himself at times, but not here.) This literary work in which I assembled the results of the two American years does not, however, »

The Watts Riot at Fifty

Featured image One of my earliest childhood memories of growing up in the San Gabriel Valley just east of downtown Los Angeles was seeing the Watts riots on television, and then looking out the front window where I could see smoke from the fires rising in the distance. This week there have been several retrospectives of the Watts riot of 1965, and its anniversary gives me an excuse to excerpt here my »

Eric Voegelin on America

Featured image I’ve written here before at length about Hayek, Leo Strauss, Milton Friedman, Richard Weaver, and other major conservative thinkers of the 20th century. I don’t think I’ve ever mentioned Eric Voegelin, another German emigre who made significant contributions to political philosophy with such works as The New Science of Politics and his multi-volume Order and History. This neglect ends today! Lately I’ve been reading Voegelin’s Autobiographical Reflections, and came across »

Richard Schweiker, RIP

Featured image I neglected to note yesterday the passing of another significant figure, former Pennsylvania Senator and HHS Secretary Richard Schweiker. He became a person of special prominence in 1976 when Ronald Reagan announced he’d pick Schweiker—who had a reputation as a very liberal Republican—if he (Reagan) wrested the nomination away from Gerald Ford. Many conservatives were appalled, but when Schweiker became HHS Secretary in 1981, he turned out to be a »