Media

Jeffrey Sterling convicted; his accomplice remains free

Featured image Jeffrey Sterling, a former Central Intelligence Agency officer, was convicted of espionage today. He was charged with telling a journalist about a secret operation to disrupt Iran’s nuclear program. The journalist was James Risen of the New York Times. Scott has written extensively about this case, focusing on Risen’s disclosure of Sterling’s secrets and the government’s unwillingness to require the journalist to testify in the case. Fortunately, Sterling was convicted »

Lessons of the Risen case

Featured image We have written several times here about the case of James Risen. Called to testify in the government’s prosecution of former CIA officer Jeffrey Sterling for violation of the Espionage Act, Risen declined to testify; Sterling had laundered his exposure of a Bush-era operation intended to undermine Iran’s nuclear program (I rashly infer from the circumstances, under a promise of confidentiality) through Risen in one of his recent books. The »

The Attkisson file

Featured image There is a lot of meat for conservatives to chew on in former CBS News reporter Sharyl Attkisson’s memoir cum exposé Stonewalled: My Fight For Truth Against the Forces of Obstruction, Intimidation and Harassment in Obama’s Washington. It is easily one of the most important political books published last year. One can infer from the subtitle of the book much of what Attkisson has on offer. One might not have »

A backgrounder for Matt Apuzzo

Featured image New York Times reporter Matt Apuzzo joined the Times in 2012. He’s a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter, but his article on the testimony of Condoleezza Rice at the trial of Jeffrey Sterling last week suggests he doesn’t know much about the Times. During her tenure as Secretary of State, Rice met with Times editors to persuade them not to publish James Risen’s draft article disclosing the highly classified CIA program »

Media Alert: Bill Bennett Show Wednesday

Featured image I’ll be guest-hosting Bill Bennett’s “Morning in America” radio show on Wednesday morning from 6 – 9 am eastern time.  Check the website for your local station, or listen online.  I’ll be breaking down President Obama’s State of the Union address from the night before, with maybe a detour about the leftist hysteria over the box office success of American Sniper, and a word or two about the “hottest year” hysteria »

At the Sterling trial

Featured image Last week the government commenced its prosecution of former CIA official Jeffrey Sterling for violation of the Espionage Act. The government alleges that Sterling leaked the details of a program intended to undermine Iran’s nuclear program to New York Times reporter James Risen. The program was subject to a security classification indicating its extreme sensitivity. Sterling did not publicly disclose the details of the CIA program; he laundered them through »

Rathergate ten years after

Featured image On Lincoln’s birthday — that’s February 12, for the young people out there — I will have the honor of giving the annual Patterson Lecture at Lyon College in Batesville, Arkansas. As I understand it, the Patterson Lecture is given by journalists and it is devoted to some aspect of journalism. I will be addressing “Rathergate ten years after.” I don’t think I’ll be speaking for more than 45 minutes »

Stockholm syndrome at the Washington Post

Featured image Stockholm syndrome occurs when hostages express empathy, sympathy, and/or positive feelings about their captors, even to the point of identifying with and/or defending them. The Washington Post, whose reporter Jason Rezaian has been imprisoned in Tehran for more than five months, appears to be experiencing something resembling Stockholm syndrome. Consider this article by Carol Morello. She reports that Iran’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, has expressed concern about what he »

Je Suis Hypocrit

Featured image Everyone feels great about proclaiming the slogan “Je suis Charlie,” but as David Brooks points out (okay, okay, get your catcalls and boos out of the way here), if Charlie Hebdo were published on just about any American college campus, the PC police would shut it down as “hate speech.” Jonathan Rauch, who as mentioned here before is an advocate of gay marriage, has some useful observations about the campus »

Risen rules

Featured image New York Times reporter James Risen was subpoenaed to testify in the prosecution of CIA officer Jeffrey Sterling. Sterling is under prosecution for blowing a CIA program intended to undermine Iran’s nuclear program. The program was subject to a security classification indicating its extreme sensitivity. To no discernible public good, Risen publicized the program in his book State of War: The Secret History of the CIA and the Bush Administration. »

60 Minutes does Obamacare

Featured image 60 Minutes turned its attention to Obamacare in a story reported by Lesley Stahl and produced by Rich Bonin this past Sunday. The segment promoted Steven Brill’s new book on Obamacare. According to Stahl and Brill, Obamacare’s great failure is its lack of price controls. Assuming price controls to be a great good — one of those great goods without a downside — the segment allocated no blame to Obama. »

The Attkisson angle

Featured image Around the time late last week that I complained of the lack of media interest in Sharyl Attkisson’s lawsuit against Eric Holder et al. for the intrusions into her computers, the Daily Beast posted a good account by Lloyd Grove in “Ex-CBS reporter Sharyl Attkisson’s battle royale with the feds.” Grove asserts that the Justice Department and the Postal Service “pushed back hard against Attkisson’s allegations.” Grove quotes the Justice »

Prophet-driven

Featured image At NRO, Ian Tuttle observes that it has become conventional to refer to “the Prophet Mohammed.” Tuttle asks why. I myself am careful not to refer to Muhammad (spelled however) as “the Prophet.” Fine if he’s yours, and no offense intended, but he’s not mine. Tuttle observes with considerable understatement: “There seems to be an implicit, unique measure of respect accorded to the religious leader of Islam that is passé »

Steadfast (non-denial) denials [updated]

Featured image Sharyl Attkisson filed her lawsuit against the Department of Justice et al. on Monday. She spoke briefly with us about it in the interview with her that we posted here on Monday afternoon. The lawsuit alleges the violation of Attkisson’s civil rights as a result of the illegal electronic monitoring and surveillance of her home and business computers and phones from 2011 to 2013. Attkisson tells the story behind the »

Notes on “Stonewalled,” part 3

Featured image This concludes my series of posts on Sharyl Attkisson’s important new book, Stonewalled: My Fight for Truth Against the Forces of Obstruction, Intimidation, and Harassment in Obama’s Washington. Part 1 is here; part 2 is here. We recorded an interview with Attkisson about the book early Monday afternoon; the interview is posted here. • Attkisson bookends her accounts of the Obama administration scandals she has covered with the story of »

Did Ted Turner Have CNN Keep an End-of-the-World Video?

Featured image I was ten years ago that I spent an evening with Ted Turner up at his enormo buffalo ranch outside Bozeman, Montana—a tale I recalled on NoLeftTurns. In a sentence, Turner is as big a barking loon as you’d expect, but he is funny as hell and hard not to like in the ordinary way. He’s also dedicated to the idea that humanity has less than 50 years to go. »

Fight! Fight! Sachs Versus Krugman!

Featured image Wasn’t it Henry Kissinger who said of the Iran-Iraq war back in the 1980s that it was too bad both sides couldn’t lose? That’s how you feel when Jeffrey Sachs, the thuggish Columbia University economist (er, “professor of sustainable development” according to his bio) whose bad advice arguably paved the way for the rise of Russia’s post-Cold War crony capitalist oligarchs, delivers some smack on Paul Krugman. But that’s exactly »