Trump unshackled

Featured image Last week, Donald Trump proclaimed that “the shackles have been taken off me.” He wasn’t kidding. Unshackled, Trump has responded affirmatively to cries of “lock [Hillary]’ up” (the shackled Trump used to respond “defeat her”). He has attacked the physical appearance of a woman who accused him of sexual touching. And he claims that such allegations are part — not just of collaboration with Democrats and the media, which is »

What now?

Featured image The Trump campaign is bleeding profusely from the wound of his Access Hollywood video. Carly Fiorina and John McCain are among the prominent Republicans who have withdrawn their support. There are also calls for Trump to step down as the Republican nominee. Andy McCarthy is among those urging this. Trump, though, has said he will never stand aside. Conceivably, he will relent, but the choke artist seems determined to hang »

Escapism anyone? A look at 2020

Featured image Assuming that Donald Trump loses this year’s presidential race, who is likely to be the GOP nominee in 2020? The FiveThirtyEight crew takes a stab at this question (as well as the Democrats’ side of the equation). The discussion is too snarky and anti-Republican for my taste, but worthwhile nonetheless. Here (in no special order) are the six Republicans I consider most likely to be the nominee in four year: »

GOP silent on AFFH, as Democrats target House seats in wealthy suburbs

Featured image The conventional wisdom holds that Republicans will maintain control of the House even if Donald Trump loses the presidential election decisively. However, most of those who subscribe to this view believe that the Democrats have some hope of taking the House. How might the Democrats accomplish this? According to the New York Times, the plan is to target seats held by Republicans in affluent suburbs of big cities. The Times »

Will Trumpism survive a Trump defeat?

Featured image Jonathan Tobin takes up the question at Commentary. He defines Trumpism as “isolationism, protectionism, and populist blood and soil nativism.” Tobin answers his question this way: Though Trumpism without Trump would be a very different and less potent movement, it is a mistake to think even a landslide defeat for the Republicans will guarantee that it can resume its past stance as a supporter of a strong America on the »

How the GOP feeds the PC beast

Featured image John Fund reports that congressional Republicans increased the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights with a very generous budget increase last year. Fund takes up the matter in the NR column “How Republicans feed the beast of political correctness.” OCR is perhaps the most left-wing office in the federal bureaucracy. Bankrolling it that way Congress did was an egregious error (for which they were rewarded with the transgender guidance). »

Reagan Without Nostalgia

Featured image I’m away at a student conference all week with the Intercollegiate Studies Institute so my postings here are pretty light as the conference schedule is very full, but anyone who is interested in helping balance the rot of “higher” education ought to support ISI. I did break away yesterday long enough to go on the Seth Leibsohn show to talk with Seth and his sidekick Chris Buskirk about how Reagan is »

Back to the Future?

Featured image From the Republican convention: Republican tariffs and immigration restrictions account largely for American wages being more than in any other country. Not only are our wages higher than in any other land, but American standards of living are far higher, hours of labor shorter and working conditions better than in any other nation. The object of a tariff is to benefit and protect our workingmen, from the lower wages, longer »

Should the GOP field keep its pledge to support the nominee?

Featured image Kevin Williamson argues that it is “absolutely the right thing to do” for Republican presidential aspirants to break their pledge to support the Republican nominee now that Trump seems to have the nomination locked up. In Williamson’s view, taking the pledge was a mistake in judgment and, as such, can be forgiven. Supporting Trump, by contrast, would be an unforgivable breach of honor. I see it differently. The promise to »

Good news from North Carolina

Featured image Two results from yesterday’s North Carolina congressional primaries are worthy of note. First, Rep. Renee Ellmers, who has been a huge disappointment to conservatives, will not return to Congress next year. She was crushed by conservative Rep. George Holding in North Carolina’s 2nd district. Ellmers, by the way, was one of the very few members of Congress who endorsed Donald Trump when the GOP presidential race was still in doubt. »

The dilemma Trump poses

Featured image Michael Gerson’s latest column attacking Donald Trump bemoans the fact that Marco Rubio has endorsed the tycoon and the prospect that Paul Ryan soon may do so. More on that later. The passage from Gerson that caught my eye is this one: Here is the problem in sum: Republicans have not been given the option of choosing the lesser of two evils. The GOP has selected someone who is unfit »

Senate Republicans block Lee Amendment, preserve AFFH

Featured image The Lee Amendment to defund President Obama’s Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) regulation failed in the Senate yesterday because not enough Republicans backed it. The Amendment was tabled by a vote of 60-37. Jeremy Carl aptly describes this vote as a defeat for conservatism, community control, and common sense. It is a victory, as Carl says, for turning the federal government into a National Zoning board, forcing high density housing »

Pence finally endorses Cruz

Featured image With only a few days remaining before the Indiana primary, Gov. Mike Pence has endorsed Ted Cruz. He did so during a radio interview this morning. Pence began by praising Donald Trump. He stated: I like and respect all three of the Republican candidates in the field. I particularly want to commend Donald Trump who I think has given voice to the frustration of millions of working Americans with a »

Gutless in Indiana [UPDATED]

Featured image A reader-activist offers the following thought on the GOP primary in Indiana: Where the hell are Daniels and Pence!? They want Trump???? Bunch of COWARDS. They should be leading and instead they are under the bed. People like that will leave us with Trump as the candidate! I agree. Trump’s big loss in Wisconsin was due in significant part to the vigorous opposition of Scott Walker and other Republican leaders »

A GOP loss in 2016 is one thing, a GOP disgrace is another

Featured image Michael Gerson takes up the question of whether, for Republicans, it is “better to lose with Cruz or Trump.” Gerson doesn’t answer the question except to say it’s too bad Republicans can’t lose with both. Gerson argues that losing with Cruz would discredit “tea party” purity. Losing with Trump would discredit “white lives matter nativism.” Both are outcomes he desires apparently about equally. I wonder whether Gerson is preoccupied with »

From the Colorado GOP convention

Featured image John Fund calls the Colorado GOP convention the scene of a political revolution. A Power Line reader writes with this first-hand report: I thought you might be interested in a report on the Colorado state Republican convention. I attended the convention as a floor delegate from my local precinct in Arvada, Colorado. My wife and I also attended the dinner and VIP fundraiser the night before. At the dinner/reception I »

The big dog barks, but the caravan moves on [UPDATED]

Featured image If you’re a Democratic politician, you uncomplainingly take crap from militant African-Americans; it’s what you do. Unless you’re Bill Clinton. He’s a former U.S. president. He doesn’t take crap from anyone. Thus, as Steve Hayward notes, the Big Dog barked back today at Black Lives Matter protesters who interrupted his speech. Clinton shouted over the protesters for more than ten minutes, rejecting their claim that Hillary’s use of the term »