Republicans

What do Americans believe about immigration?

Featured image Kellyanne Conway has released the results of a new poll on immigration. The poll takes a deeper look at the issue than any survey I recall seeing. It finds that (1) immigration has become a massive issue, (2) neither political party has an edge on immigration, but (3) the issue represents a major opportunity for Republicans if they adopt a stance that favors American workers over immigrants. A majority of »

Rick Perry and the Democrats’ pattern of “lawfare” against rising Republicans

Featured image John and Scott have commented on the indictment of Gov. Rick Perry. As they note, it fits a pattern of politically motivated indictments of prominent Texas Republicans. The Perry indictment also fits a pattern of harassment via the legal process of prominent Republican governors: Sarah Palin, Scott Walker, Chris Christie, and now Perry. What do these four have in common? Why, they all are (or were) potentially viable candidates for »

Pat Roberts leads Tea Party challenger in Kansas [UPDATED, Roberts wins]

Featured image Tonight’s Republican Senate primary in Kansas has been billed by Politico as the “last shot” for the Tea Party to defeat a Republican incumbent Senator this year. Apparently, Politico assumes that Lamar Alexander in Tennessee is not vulnerable to his Tea Party challenger. So far, the returns are favorable to Roberts, but the race is close. Roberts leads challenger Milton Wolf by 47.8 percent to 41.4 percent with half of »

Democrats tilt towards Hamas, blame Republicans

Featured image Caroline Glick makes a persuasive case that under President Obama, America has switched sides in the Middle East. It has switched, that is, from Israel’s side to that of Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood. You could argue that Obama has switched sides twice. First, during the failed peace process, from Israel to the Palestinian Authority; now, in the Gaza war, from the PA to Hamas. After all, Obama undercut the »

This week in conservative history — Goldwater’s acceptance speech

Featured image 50 years ago this week, Barry Goldwater accepted the Republican nomination for president with this speech. Today, it makes for a great and timely read. But the speech should really be viewed (and can be here; watch for Richard Nixon’s reactions) in order to understand its impact. The main impact of the speech, unfortunately, was to scare Americans. Indeed, although Lyndon Johnson’s campaign did a masterful job of scaring Americans »

Crony capitalism and the GOP fault line

Featured image Yesterday, I discussed a new study by the Pew Research Center. It identifies two main groups of Republicans — “business conservatives” and “staunch conservatives.” The two factions agree on much, but they part company when it comes to their attitude towards corporations. Most steadfast conservatives say too much power is concentrated in the hands of a few large companies, and they are evenly split as to whether the economic system »

How deeply divided is the GOP?

Featured image The Pew Research Center is out with a study that, as characterized by the Washington Post, shows “the GOP faces continued instability because of profoundly different views on some issues held by those who identify with the party.” To me, the study presents a more mixed picture. The Pew study identifies two main Republican groups — the “business conservatives” and the “steadfast conservatives.” It finds significant commonalities between the two. »

Why is the Tea Party like Lebron James?

Featured image Because the assessment of both seems to change on almost a daily basis. If you listen to sportswriters, sports-call hosts, and sports-callers, you’d think there were two players named Lebron James. When Miami wins an important playoff game, James is a ferocious, do-it-all competitor who has led Miami to four straight NBA title series and is beginning to rate comparison with Michael Jordan. When Miami loses a big game, James »

Re: Eric Cantor

Featured image A reader writes with a timely expression of gratitude to Eric Cantor: Though I would have voted for Dave Brat due to the immigration issue, I just called Eric Cantor’s Washington office to express my gratitude for the work he has done over the past five years. Sometimes we forget how gloomy January 2009 was, with the Presidency and Congress (supermajority, no less) in liberal Democrat hands. He, John Boenher, »

After Cantor

Featured image Some additional observations going forward on the Cantor debacle: I never found Cantor to be a very compelling political personality.  I thought his speeches were too superficial and cliché (even if they were the right clichés), and his delivery flat.  It left me with the impression that the ratio of personal ambition to substance was out of whack.  But there’s more to being House majority leader than being a scintillating »

Notes on Cantormageddon

Featured image Only last week in a local Richmond television interview, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor addressed immigration reform as follows: “I have told the president, there are some things we can work on together. We can work on the border security bill together, we can work on something like the kids.” This while the southwest United States is under invasion by an overwhelming wave of “kids” who have gotten the message. »

Mississippi’s Republican brawl too close to call [UPDATED -- runoff coming]

Featured image This is another primary day in the 2014 cycle. The most interesting race is the Republican Senate primary in Mississippi between longtime Senator Thad Cochran and state Sen. Chris McDaniel, the Tea Party’s favorite in the race. I don’t believe we have written about this contest and, frankly, I have averted my eyes. It has been that distasteful. I’ve always thought, however, that Mississippi could do with a more conservative »

Reform conservatism: Do conservatives want it?

Featured image The YG Network has produced a manifesto for reform conservatism, the movement spearheaded by leading conservative thinkers who want to enact innovative programs that will assist the middle class while adhering to principles of limited government. The book — Room to Grow — features chapters by Power Line favorites Peter Wehner, Yuval Levin, Ramesh Ponnuru, James Capretta (on health care), James Pethokoukis (financial and regulatory reform) and others. I look »

In other primary news

Featured image Monica Wehby, a pediatric neurosurgeon, has won the Oregon Senate primary and will face incumbent Democrat Jeff Merkley. Wehby defeated state Rep. Jason Conger by a margin of 51-37. Such polling as exists suggests that Wehby has a shot at defeating her non-descript opponent. However, Wehby, a divorced mother, has come under fire for her involvement in two domestic disputes. Her ex-boyfriend apparently called the police on her for alleged »

Georgia Republican Senate Primary produces a runoff

Featured image With more than 90 percent of the precincts reporting in Georgia, the Republican Senate primary has finally been called. David Perdue will finish first and Rep. Jack Kingston will finish second. Perdue is at 30.3 percent; Kingston at 26.2 percent. Accordingly, there will be a runoff in July. Because the three candidates who came in next are quite conservative, and because collectively they captured more than 40 percent of the »

Sasse supreme

Featured image Nebraska Republican Ben Sasse prevailed in a competitive four-way primary yesterday to be the party’s candidate to succeed the retiring Mike Johanns. Sasse was recognized as the best man before the get-go by the Weekly Standard (see Mark Hemingway’s June 2013 profile) and thereafter by National Review (see John Miller’s January 2014 profile). Sasse is young, smart, and a diehard opponent of Obamacare. He is the president of Midland University. »

A long, hard fall for Rubio and Christie in New Hampshire

Featured image A new Granite State poll of likely New Hampshire Republican primary voters is out. The poll was conducted for WMUR by the University of New Hampshire. The results can’t be taken too seriously because only 1 percent of those surveyed say they have definitely decided how they will vote. But the results are interesting, nonetheless. Rand Paul is the leader at 15 percent. He is followed by “favorite daughter” Kelly »