Terror convictions since 9/11

The Department of Justice has tracked convictions resulting from international terrorism investigations conducted since September 11, 2001. It has compiled a chart of convictions that is included in this document.
In light of Rep. Peter King’s hearings on the threat posed by radicalized Islam in the United States, the chart is an extremely interesting documents. The folks at the Investigative Project on Terrorism have analyzed it, finding that Islamists are prominently featured, with more than 80 percent of all convictions tied to international terrorist groups and homegrown terrorism since 9/11 involving defendants driven by a radical Islamist agenda.
“Though Muslims represent about 1 percent of the American population,” the IPT notes, “they constitute defendants in 186 of the 228 cases DoJ lists.” Thirty of the terror cases listed, or about 13 percent, involve homegrown Islamist terrorists.
The DoJ compilation includes convictions into March 2010; the IPT article cites a number of prosecutions for Islamist related terrorist activity since then.
In his USA Today column, Rep. King cites the testimony of Eric Holder on recent terrorism indictments: “126 people have been indicted on terrorist-related charges in the past two years, including 50 U.S. citizens. The great majority of those charged are violent jihadists.”
The information is highly relevant to the controversy over Rep. King’s hearings, yet it hasn’t received much attention in this context. I’m not sure whether the New York Times has ever reported on it; I don’t think it has.
Yet the Times has made much of King’s past support for the IRA. Yesterday it devoted a page-one story to it. The New York Post comments: “as if anyone ever declined to walk through Times Square for fear of being blown up by a rabid Irishman.”
King’s past support of the IRA is not to his credit. But it is of no relevance except as a political talking point to attack King’s hearings. “The fact is,” King himself told the Times, “the IRA never attacked the United States. And my loyalty is to the United States.” Is this a difficult point?

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