International Law

Power and Constraint — a book review

Featured image Jack Goldsmith is a professor at Harvard Law School. During part of President George W. Bush’s first term, Goldsmith served as Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Counsel in the U.S. Department of Justice. His is one of the best legal minds I know of. Goldsmith is the author of Power and Constraint: The Accountable Presidency After 9/11, published earlier this year. I have written a review of »

What the IOC teaches us

Featured image Friday’s opening ceremony at the London Olympics proceeded without any moment of silence for, or other tribute to, the Israeli athletes who were murdered at the Munich Olympics by Palestinian terrorists 40 years ago. There was, however, a moment of silence for the victims of the two world wars and other international conflicts. Thus, IOC President Jacques Rogge was lying when he claimed that the decision not to honor the »

Taming international law — Israel as the canary in the coal mine

Featured image No aspect of the modern leftist project poses more danger than the left’s approach to international law. By definition, international law is in tension with national sovereignty, but the “transnationalist” approach to international law advanced by leftists threatens to run roughshod over sovereignty. And, in the case of democracies, a threat to sovereignty means a threat to the ability of citizens to govern themselves. One of the most acute threats »

CRB: Against the Globalistas

Featured image This morning we continue with our preview of the new (Spring) issue of the Claremont Review of Books (subscribe here). Yesterday we took a look at Professor James Ceaser’s essay “Restoring the Constitution,” the first wallop in a one-two punch that is followed by John Marini’s “Abandoning the Constitution.” John Fonte’s book Sovereignty Or Submission: Will Americans Rule Themselves Or Be Ruled By Others? considers the epic struggle between the »

Taming international law, three proposals

Featured image No aspect of the modern leftist project poses more danger than the left’s approach to international law. By definition, international law is in tension with national sovereignty, but the “transnationalist” approach to international law advanced by leftists threatens to run roughshod over sovereignty. And, in the case of the United States, a threat to sovereignty means a threat to democracy — to the ability of Americans to govern themselves. In »

Taming International Law — Two Books

Featured image No aspcet of the modern leftist project poses more danger than the left’s approach to international law. By definition, interational law is in tension with national sovereignty, but the “transnationalist” approach to international law advanced by leftists threatens to run roughshod over sovereignty. And, in the case of the United States, a threat to sovereignty means a threat to democracy — to the ability of Americans to govern themselves. Two »