The man our founders warned us against

Featured image In the late 1960’s Nicholas Von Hoffman published his portrait of the hippies in San Francisco under the title We Are the People Our Parents Warned Us Against. Von Hoffman’s title was a precursor to the inane messianism of Obama’s “We are the ones we’ve been waiting for,” though Von Hoffman’s title made more sense than Obama’s shibboleth. In his assumption of monarchical powers and his accompanying demagogy, Barack Obama »

Headlines highlight Obamacare’s abysmal state

Featured image As most of our readers know, this week the nation’s largest insurer, UnitedHealth, threatened to stop offering insurance plans to individuals through the public exchanges established by Obamacare. Low enrollment and high usage have made participation a losing proposition for the company. If UnitedHealth exits, more than a half million people will have to find other coverage. But this might not be easy. As Katherine Hempstead, who heads the insurance »

Is Obamacare spiraling downward?

Featured image It has been a while since I read an “Obamacare death spiral” article, and this article by Akash Chougule of Americans for Prosperity stops short of claiming that Obamacare is in one now. However, it does contend that with co-ops failing and enrollment in non-co-op programs slowing, President Obama’s signature program is in a “downward spiral.” Let’s look first at the co-ops. They were inserted into Obamacare as a kind »

Pajama boy, call your daddy’s office

Featured image The Obama administration says it expects only a slight increase in the number of people with private insurance purchased through Obamacare next year. Currently, it estimates that 9.1 million will have such insurance at the end of 2015. At the end of 2016, it predicts the number will rise to 10 million. This is a far cry from previous government estimates. Indeed, it is only about half the number recently »

Fiorina supported a type of individual mandate; is this the beginning of her end

Featured image Now that Carly Fiorina has emerged as a top-six candidate (at worst) for the GOP nomination, she will receive serious scrutiny. The little scrutiny she has received to date focuses on her record as the CEO of Hewlett-Packard. That record is relevant to her candidacy. For me, however, her past positions on the major issues are more important. Has she been a consistent, hard-line conservative? The early returns aren’t good »

Obamacare enrollment plunges

Featured image The Washington Post reports that nearly 1 in 4 of the people who picked a health care plan for 2015 through Obamacare marketplaces have dropped or lost their coverage. As of the end of June, 9.9 million people were paying for health care plans they obtained through the federal or state-run insurance exchanges created by the Obamacare legislation. That’s a decline from the 12.7 million who signed up for a »

Obama in full, and full of it

Featured image President Obama appeared on the Daily Show with Jon Stewart the day before yesterday. Video of the extended full episode (I think) is posted below. Obama is playing before a friendly audience and Stewart does everything but give him a French kiss. He wants to, but modesty somehow intrudes. Stewart’s approach to Obama reminds me of Howard Stern interviewing Rudy Giuliani in the course of one of Giuliani’s reelection campaigns: »

Triumph of the leftist will

Featured image The Supreme Court issued its decision in King v Burwell yesterday. The Supreme Court has posted its opinions in the case here. At issue in King was the legality of the IRS’s provision of tax credits in Obamacare exchanges established by the federal government. As Professor Jonathan Adler wrote in USA Today, the case “presents a straightforward case of statutory interpretation.” As such, it wasn’t a hard case; it was »

Have Republicans Saved the Obama Administration?

Featured image Within the last 48 hours, the Obama administration dodged two huge bullets. First, Congressional Republicans passed the trade promotion authority act, paving the way for passage of the Trans Pacific Partnership, which the administration has been negotiating for years, and the Trade In Services Agreement. Then, this morning, the Supreme Court bailed out Obamacare, rewriting key provisions of the Affordable Care Act to prevent Obamacare from collapsing, with two presumed »

From Justice Scalia’s dissent

Featured image Justice Scalia dissented vigorously from the Supreme Court’s decision upholding Obamacare subsidies on the federal exchange. Justices Thomas and Alito joined in that dissent. Here are key excerpts from Scalia’s dissent: We should start calling this law SCOTUScare. The Court interprets §36B to award tax credits on both federal and state Exchanges. It accepts that the “most natural sense” of the phrase “Exchange established by the State” is an Exchange »

Behold, the Supreme Court’s Magical Warp Field Generator!

Featured image I recall once reading an interview with one of the head writers of Star Trek: The Next Generation—you know, the faux Star Trek series where the role of Captain Kirk was reimagined by the UN and the National Organization of Women.  (No: This is not arguable. Just as there is only one real James Bond—Sean Connery, damnit—there is only one Star Trek. Simple rule: if it doesn’t have William Shatner, »

Supreme Court upholds Obamacare subsidies [With Comment by John]

Featured image The vote was 6-3. Chief Justice Roberts wrote the opinion. The dissenters were Justices Scalia, Thomas, and Alito. Two big wins for the Obama administration today, the other being the housing case (see post below). UPDATE: According to SCOTUSblog, where I’m following today’s developments, the majority acknowledges the strength of the argument that the plain language of the statute permits subsidies only on state exchanges. However, the majority says that »

Rumors of Gruber

Featured image The late Arnaud de Borchgrave and the still kicking Robert Moss published The Spike in 1980 to expose the power of the media to suppress politically unpalatable stories in the service of covert political interests. The University of Chicago’s Peter B. Ritzma Professor of Political Science Charles Lipson draws on the metaphor of “the spike” to describe what has happened to the revelations of Monday’s Wall Street Journal story reporting »

The Gruber variations

Featured image On Morning Joe yesterday, the crew assessed the veracity of the Obama administration against the page-two Wall Street Journal story that I quoted and commented on in “From the mixed-up files of Jonathan Gruber.” On MSNBC a good time was had by all. Kudos to Joe Scarborough for picking up the story and to his sidekick Mika for playing it relatively straight. As for the rest, this is an unimpressive »

From the mixed-up files of Jonathan Gruber

Featured image You have to wonder if the Obama administration has ever uttered a true word about Obamacare. I say no. President Obama has shifted the prevarications into overdrive in anticipation of the Supreme Court’s imminent decision on the IRS’s regulatory revision of the Obamacare law in King v. Burwell. On the issue before the Court in the case, we await a true word from the Obama administration, but we’re not holding »

What’s the Obamacare backup plan?

Featured image Any day now, the Supreme Court will issue a decision on whether Obamacare subsidies are available to those who purchase health insurance on the federal exchange. I think the likelihood that the Court will say subsidies can’t be paid to such purchasers is a little south of 50 percent. But if the Court does decide King v. Burwell that way, millions of Americans will stand to lose their insurance subsidies. »

Question of the day

Featured image President Obama spoke to the Catholic Health Association yesterday in defense of Obamacare. The White House has posted the text of his remarks here. The White House has also posted a video of the speech (below) and an overfull Web page celebrating the deep thoughts of our Dear Leader on the subject. The New York Times story on the speech is here. The Supreme Court’s pending decision in King v. »