Science

Behind Science Fraud

Featured image We reported here the other day about the latest fraudulent article in Science magazine, but don’t miss the op-ed about the broader problem of science fraud in today’s New York Times by Adam Marcus and Ivan Oransky (who is one of the founders of RetractionWatch). Here’s the most relevant excerpt: Science fetishizes the published paper as the ultimate marker of individual productivity. And it doubles down on that bias with »

Paging Dr. Emily Litella: Another Science Fraud Exposed

Featured image Last December Science magazine published the results of a survey that found people who had a conversation of at little as 20 minutes with a gay person changed their mind about gay marriage. You may well wonder why Science, usually concerned with settled scientific matters like global warming climate change, would jump on a research survey more suited for a public opinion or social science journal, and further you’d wonder »

Science Versus “Scientism”

Featured image I’ve decided I’m going to call myself an “Islamoskeptic,” because it neatly combines two left-wing, debate-stifling epithets at one stroke. If you criticize Islam, you’re an “Islamophobe”—the moral equivalent of a racist, so shut up we don’t have to listen to you any more. And if you align at all with climate skepticism and criticize any aspect of climate change orthodoxy, you’re met with the shutdown term of “science denier.” »

The Peerless Pitfalls of Peer Review

Featured image Back finally to an old topic leftover from the climate inquisition a few weeks back. One of our lefty commenters thought it important to raise the issue that I don’t publish “peer-reviewed” articles about climate issues in the academic literature, which is true. It’s something I have in common with Al Gore. (Heh.) Besides, I prefer to write in plain English for human beings rather than the 10 people who »

#Shirtgate explained

Featured image The feminist establishment has gone completely around the bend. I’m not sure when it happened.; I doubt it is a recent development. In her prescient 1972 book The New Chastity and Other Arguments Against Women’s Liberation, Midge Decter examined the second-generation literature of feminism and found it rotten at the core, if not rotten to the core. I haven’t kept up with the literature. My impression, however, is that the »

Obama’s “Settled Science”

Featured image Remember how Obama promised in his first inaugural address to “restore science to its rightful place”? Beyond this gratuitous dig at the outgoing Bush administration, it is curious to see that Obama’s idea of scientific authority is the egregious John Holdren, whom Obama chose as his science adviser. For Halloween our pal Rob Bradley of the Institute for Energy Research compiled a list of Holdren’s greatest hits over at the »

Breach of protocol, or something

Featured image The NIH’s Dr. Anthony Fauci appeared on Meet the Press with Chuck Todd this morning (video below). The occasion of his appearance was the new case of Ebola that has been contracted by a Dallas “health worker” who treating the patient from Liberia who died last week. How could the health worker have gotten infected with Ebola? “What obviously happened, unfortunately, is that there was an inadvertent breach of protocol,” »

Beyond Catalist, perhaps

Featured image Last week J. Christian Adams posted an important and informative column on “‘CATALIST’: The Democrats’ database for fundamentally transforming America.” This was all news to me, I confess, and I am grateful to have it brought to my attention. Please check it out. Catalist, as I understand it, is the database that, among other things, helps Democrats microtarget voters. Adams points out that Mitt Romney won independents in the 2012 »

Trust Us, We’re Scientists

Featured image So if the scientific establishment is so robust and full of integrity and credibility, how does this happen: This scientific journal just had to retract 60 papers One of the biggest cases of scientific misconduct in history was uncovered this week. On July 8, scientific publisher SAGE announced that it was retracting a whopping 60 scientific papers connected to Taiwanese researcher Peter Chen, in what appears to be an elaborate work »

Charles Does Indeed Blow

Featured image Outside of universities, the other notable place with a shocking lack of ideological and cultural diversity is major media newsrooms.  While most newsrooms have the requisite numbers of women, minorities, and gays (nearly all of them liberal conformists), you will seldom find an evangelical Christian or an orthodox Jew. Hence you find New York Times columnist Charles Blow reflecting today that not only are lots of Americans Christians, but they »

Conservatives and Climate Policy

Featured image Not long ago the journal Issues in Science and Technology (a consortium publication of the National Academy of Sciences, Arizona State, and three other institutions) challenged me to write a piece about “Conservatism and Climate Science,” and the long piece is just now available online.  But it’s really not about climate science, but rather climate policy, and the heart of the article is a lengthy consideration of the problem of »

Clueless Scientists?

Featured image Conservatives are said to be “anti-science,” though one ought to pause once and a while and ponder where the opposition to vaccines and genetically modified organisms comes from.  A belief in a literal six-day creation 6,000 years ago harms no one; urging parents not to vaccinate their children, as prominent liberals and celebrities have done, leads to unnecessary death and disease. One problem for the scientific community is that much »

There May Be Plenty More Fish In the Sea

Featured image An interesting item for a Friday evening: a team of Australian researchers has come to the startling conclusion that there are 20 times as many fish in the sea as previously believed: Scientists have vastly underestimated the number of fish in the sea – and say the majority of them have never been fished. Australian researchers found that mesopelagic fish, which live between 100 and 1000m below the surface, constitute »

Most Democrats Need Remedial Science Education

Featured image One of the more amusing aspects of the current political scene is the claim of liberals to be “pro-science”–a claim that is often made in the context of the catastrophic anthropogenic global warming theory, which is anything but scientific. Science is a method, not a body of dogma, and I am not aware of anyone in public life who is anti-science. Of course, before you can be pro- or anti-anything, »

This Is What A Disruptive Technology Looks Like . . .

Featured image . . . in its first moments.  Hat tip to FB pal and Power Line reader Kate Pitrone for flagging this old video from 1981, showing the earliest experiments with online news gathering and transmission.  I vividly recall seeing the earliest version of FAX technology back in 1981, when my mentor M. Stanton Evans would send his syndicated column to the Los Angeles Times by wrapping each page of the »

Oh What the Heck: A “Killer Party” Blast from the Archives

Featured image The Green Weenie of the Week about the weather and violent crime reminded of the all-time most risible excursion into social science fatuity back in 2002, when a couple of journal articles claimed to discern a correlation between high suicide rates and conservatives parties being in power.  So from the archives from September 2oo2, here’s my short column “Killer Party.”  File this under “Social Science: Is There Anything It Can’t do?” Conservatives »

Video of the Week

Featured image It is not necessary to be a Trekkie (but really, why wouldn’t you be?) to appreciate the intergenerational rivalry of this Audi ad featuring the original Mr. Spock (Leonard Nimoy) versus the “rebooted” younger Spock, Zachary Quinto. And kudos to Nimoy, for being game to spoof the most embarrassing moment of his entire career; and no, I don’t mean that Trek episode where he got the seven-year Vulcan itch.  Rather, »