Great Britain

The Stakes In Britain (Rolling Updates: Exit Polls Indicate Tory Landslide)

Featured image As I write we’re not far away from getting the first results of the British election today. I’ve seen stories of long lines to vote and indicators of a heavy turnout. And the British Pound seems to be under pressure today, which might be an ill omen, except that recall the Dow Jones futures plummeted on election night here in 2016, before soaring the next day when people realized that »

Go Boris! (Or, “Boris, Actually.”)

Featured image I haven’t had time to devote sufficient attention to the British election that is now less than 72 hours away. The polls give reason for confidence that the Tories are going to win, since they have tended in recent elections to outperform their polls. This is still rather amazing considering the debacle of the Theresa May government. But the Tories have Boris Johnson, while Labour has the execrable Jeremy Corbyn. »

The Power Line Show, Ep. 154: Henry Olsen with the Inside Baseball on Politics and . . . Baseball

Featured image This week I catch up with Henry Olsen to go through the inside baseball of the unfolding Democratic presidential primary season, but also the inside baseball about . . . baseball! Did you know that the Houston Astros colluded with the Russians and Ukrainians to steal the 2017 World Series! So runs the allegation, with hearings no doubt to follow. In any case, I actually stumped Henry by recalling the »

Prorogues and Pro-Rogues

Featured image I won’t pretend to have substantial knowledge of the intricacies of Britain’s unwritten constitution, or the workings of their judicial system that has sat uneasily beneath the doctrine of parliamentary supremacy since at least the time of Sir Edward Coke and Blackstone. One of my favorite books on my law shelf can help explain the conundrum for anyone not steeped in British law: It is Theodore Plucknett’s A Concise History of »

Boris In Charge

Featured image Boris Johnson is now prime minister of Great Britain, and the British establishment, including much of his own party, is horrified at this turn of events, just like the American Establishment (including the GOP hierarchy) were horrified by Donald Trump’s election. I can report on some of the early sentiment. Queen Elizabeth and Prince Charles are said to be “bitterly opposed” to Johnson becoming prime minister. A cabinet secretary has been »

About that ex-British ambassador to the U.S.

Featured image Sir Kim Darroch, the British ambassador to the U.S. whose blistering and insulting dispatches about President Trump became public, has resigned his position. I don’t see that he had much choice. It is unrealistic to expect any president, and certainly not the current one, to deal with an ambassador whose contempt for him is this deep and now this public. And Britain would be poorly served by an ambassador to »

Lost & found: Trump’s GMB interview

Featured image I posted the full video of President Trump’s interview by Piers Morgan on Good Morning Britain here yesterday morning, shortly after it had been posted on YouTube by GMB itself. Steve Cates writes from Catallaxy Files to note that he watched it as well until it disappeared. Steve has posted the excerpts still available on YouTube and linked to the full video posted at Bing. “All this is recounted in »

Trump does GMB [updated]

Featured image President Trump sat down with Piers Morgan for a 30-minute interview on Good Morning Britain. Touting the interview as a world exclusive, GMB has just posted the video on YouTube. I have posted the video below. Morgan’s interview covers Trump’s state visit and America’s relationship with the United Kingdom. “In the half-hour long chat in Churchill’s historic war rooms,” GMB notes, “Trump clarifies his ‘nasty’ comments about Meghan Markle and »

Tories trounced, Farage flying

Featured image I haven’t found exactly what I’ve been looking for in the way of analysis of the European Parliament election results in the United Kingdom. The Telegraph’s weekly newsletter summary put it this way yesterday: The Conservatives have been decimated in the European elections and recorded their worst result in history, as Nigel Farage’s six-week-old Brexit party triumphed. The European elections, which were never supposed to happen, proved disastrous for both »

Gaffe machine Biden strikes again

Featured image Yesterday, Joe Biden claimed that 14 foreign leaders have called him to “voice concern” about President Trump. Among the 14, he said, was Margaret Thatcher. Lady Thatcher died in 2013, thus missing out on the Trump presidency. Biden then corrected himself, saying that he was actually referring to current British Prime Minister Theresa May. He called his mistake a “Freudian slip.” Freudian? Maybe. Both are female authority figures (though May’s »

Maggie, 40 Years On

Featured image Today is the 40th anniversary of the election of Margaret Thatcher as the first female prime minister of Great Britain—a precursor of the election the following year of Ronald Reagan. Before her arrival many people thought England’s long, slow postwar decline was irreversible.  “Britain is becoming a third world country . . . an offshore industrial slum,” Economist magazine correspondent Robert Moss wrote in 1977. Daniel Yergin and Joseph Stanislaw recall in »

“Green” Energy Policies Hurt the Environment, Another Case Study

Featured image Britain has a fracking industry–or could have one, anyway, if it weren’t for the Greens’ political clout. It finally became too much for Natascha Engel, Britain’s “fracking czar,” who quit with a blistering letter of resignation: Natascha Engel’s decision to walk away from such a high-profile role is driven, she says, by her dismay that Ministers are jeopardising Britain’s energy security because they would rather appease noisy green campaigners than »

Brexit, The Musical

Featured image We have Hamilton, the musical, but the British now have its, um, very rough (strong language warning!) equivalent about Brexit. I think the continuing clown show within the British government over Brexit is one of the key stories of our time, and the outcome, like the 2016 vote itself, contains significant meaning for the United States, for the question of Brexit is the same as the question with Trump: Are »

Seven MPs quit Labour Party over anti-Semitism

Featured image Yesterday, seven members of Parliament left Britian’s Labour Party. They will remain in Parliament as an independent bloc. The Washington Post has the details. The leader of Britain’s small Liberal Democrat party said he hoped to work with this bloc. He also suggested that it might grow in the near future. The seven MPs cited several areas of disagreement with the direction of the Labour Party under its radical head, »

A Reminder of Better Times and Better Leaders

Featured image Is it purely a coincidence that the governments of Britain, France, and Germany are all in deep trouble? Both Theresa May and Emmanuel Macron may not survive the week, and Angela Merkel is testing just how long a lame duck period is possible. Gee—I wonder what they have in common? It’s a total mystery. (NB: Theresa May and the Tories would likely already be gone were it not for the »

Back in the Saddle

Featured image We returned last night from 11 days of vacation in England, so normal posting will resume as soon as I have had a chance to catch up on the news. In particular, I need to figure out how the Democrats plan to impeach President Trump on the ground that he used his own money as consideration for a nondisclosure agreement with Stormy Danials (and, I take it, one other woman). »

The Power Line Show, Ep. 91: The Deep End of the (Lord) Liverpool

Featured image This week the Power Line Show takes a break from the All-Kavanaugh-All-the-Time format of recent weeks, and sits down with historian William Anthony Hay, author of a brand new biography of Robert Banks Jenkinson. What? You’ve never heard of Robert Banks Jenkinson? You might recognize him better by his “stage name,” Lord Liverpool, Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1812-1827, during the windup of the Napoleonic wars and the War »